Child Protection

PEXELS.COM

A state health official from New Jersey has been tapped to serve as the new leader of New Hampshire’s Division of Children, Youth and Families. 

Educating The Educators On Childhood Trauma

Aug 15, 2017
Us Census Bureau

As the opioid crisis continues to rupture families, the emotional impact on children is widespread. In some school districts, mental health experts are training teachers, school nurses, and administrators to better manage the trauma faced by students, in order to help them cope and learn.


Despite a push from all sides, New Hampshire’s child protection agency is still struggling to correct staffing issues and case backlogs.

The state’s Division for Children, Youth and Families is overdue on nearly 3,000 open abuse and neglect investigations. And according to media reports, DCYF presented disappointing progress to lawmakers Wednesday.

Fatal Flaws: DCYF Looks To Reform

Apr 17, 2017
Pixabay.com

A recent Concord Monitor series examines the many problems at New Hampshire's Division of Children, Youth and Families, including child abuse cases where at least eight children died in the last half-decade. The drug crisis, high staff turnover, limited funding, and restrictive policies all present challenges as the state looks to reform. 


Courtroom One Gavel
Joe Gratz / Flickr Creative Commons

A ruling in a high-profile case involving the state's child protection agency, the Division for Children, Youth and Families, may clear the way for confidentiality to be waived in future legal proceedings involving DCYF.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

New Hampshire lawmakers met Friday to discuss policy changes to better protect at-risk kids. The effort comes on the heels of an outside review that faulted the state’s child protection agency. 

The Child Protection Act applies to cases when there’s clear evidence of child abuse or neglect, but a special legislative commission hopes to introduce a middle step between unfounded and founded reports of abuse. John DeJoie, with Child and Family Services, was part of a group that suggested another option for state health officials.

NHPR Staff

The state Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday on whether a lawsuit over the state’s handling of child abuse and neglect cases should be open to the public.

The details of these types of lawsuits are almost always sealed by court order.

But attorneys for an adoptive family of two young victims of sexual abuse told the court that the case should be heard in open court.

All Things Considered host Peter Biello spoke with NHPR digital reporter Brian Wallstin, who has reported on this case and attended the hearing at the Supreme Court.

 A hearing before the state Supreme Court on Tuesday will center on a sensitive question: Should lawsuits involving child abuse and neglect be open to the public?

 

The issue stems from a series of high-profile cases in New Hampshire in which two children died and two others were sexually abused. Almost without exception, the details of these types of lawsuits are sealed by court order, making them among the most secretive legal proceedings in the state.

 

A non-profit organization that trains volunteers to represent child victims in neglect and abuse cases is asking lawmakers to grant it immunity from civil and criminal liability.

Jonathan Cohen via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/78H5Sy

New Hampshire's child protection division is proposing adding a second shift and a new on-call system as a first step toward being able to respond to allegations 24 hours a day and seven days a week.