Citizen's United

(Photo by <a href'="">Tony Swartz </a>via Flickr Creative Commons)

  New Hampshire may join several other states who are considering calling for a federal constitutional convention.

The House Committee on State-Federal Relations and Veteran Affairs voted to support two of four bills that would call for a convention under Article V of the U.S. Constitution.

One of the bills backed by the committee targets campaign finance issues brought on by the U.S. Supreme Court decision in the Citizens United case.

Calls from 34 states or a two-thirds vote in Congress is needed for a constitutional convention to take place.

Early on, predictions were that this twenty-ten U.S. Supreme Court decision would lead outside groups to play an outsized role in our elections, by allowing unlimited political spending.  But now, some question how big an impact Citizens United really had.  We’ll look at this debate in New Hampshire. 


Photo by DonkeyHotey, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

In the President’s 2010 State of the Union speech, Obama touched on a Supreme Court decision that has come to define the heated debate surrounding the financing of campaign 2012.  The GOP defends Citizens United on the basis of free speech – while democrats decry the vast sums of anonymous cash as allowing unlimited corporate influence in elections. Notably, however, neither party is arguing against the power of money in politics, with major candidates reaping the benefits of the ads well-funded super PACs can afford to buy.