colby-sawyer

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New Hampshire’s Colby-Sawyer College plans to eliminate five majors. The cuts come amidst declining enrollment and financial concerns at the school. 

For the past two years the college has been operating at a loss of more than $2 million.  This year that loss is projected to be at $2.6 million. 

The decision to cut was based on money, but how did the school decide to cut these programs? And what does that decision say about where liberal arts education is headed?

Facing a projected operating loss of $2.6 million, New Hampshire's Colby-Sawyer College says it will "restructure" and lay off 18 employees.

College President Sue Stuebner says seven faculty members and 11 staffers at the New London college received notice Monday. Another 11 learned their hours will be modified and more than a dozen who are leaving won't be replaced.

The Valley News reports Stuebner attributes the current year's operating loss to recent fluctuation in Colby-Sawyer's enrollment, which went from about 1,500 four years ago to 1,100 this year.

Small Colleges, Big Challenges

Jul 11, 2016
courtesy of Colby-Sawyer College

Nationwide, many smaller institutions are struggling to survive due to dwindling enrollment, rural locations, and doubt about the inherent value of a liberal education.  We talk with two New Hampshire college presidents to find out how they're facing these new economic realities and an uncertain future. 

GUESTS:

  • Scott Carlson, Senior Writer with the Chronicle of Higher Education.
  • Dr. Kim Mooney, incoming President of Franklin Pierce University. She is a Franklin Pierce alumna, formerly Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs, and served on the board of trustees of Franklin Pierce College.
  • Dr. Susan Stuebner, President of Colby-Sawyer College in New London, N.H.  She took office July 1st.  Previously she was Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at Allegheny College in Pennsylvania.


Colby-Sawyer College

The president of Colby-Sawyer College plans to step down next year.

Thomas C. Galligan announced this week that he will leave the job at the end of June, when he’ll wrap up his tenth year at the helm of the small New London college.