College

Assessing Greek Life On College Campuses

Aug 24, 2015
Tbass Effendi / Flickr/cc

Fraternities have been getting more bad press lately after embarrassing incidents from racist chants in Oklahoma to the branding of pledges here in New Hampshire. We’ll look at the headlines, but also behind them, including what the data says about the impact of fraternity and sorority life for students from grades to personal health.

mountwashington.edu

Citing declining enrollment, officials with Mount Washington College in Manchester say the school will close in April of next year.

In a statement on its website, the for-profit college says it will stop enrolling new students immediately and will focus its attention on the school’s roughly 500 current students.

The college says students can complete their programs of study online through Kaplan University free of charge.

Kaplan owns Mount Washington College, formerly known as Hesser College.

The Dollars And Cents of College Degrees

May 12, 2015
John Walker / Flickr/cc

In the shadow of the Great Recession, many prospective students and their parents are looking at college with an eye toward the economic value of certain majors, with some hoping to avoid the so called 'useless' degree. We take a look at some surprising new research on this topic and hear from voices both in and out of the college system.

Ben Saren via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/MJB5k

  New Hampshire Governor Maggie Hassan and Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina are among the speakers at college commencement ceremonies across New Hampshire this weekend.

Hassan is set to speak at Keene State College’s ceremony at Fiske Quad Saturday afternoon.

Courtesy The University Of New Hampshire

 Officials at the University of New Hampshire and the Durham Police Department say they’re ready if any end-of-semester parties get out of hand this week.

Tuesday is the reading day, a campus-wide study day ahead of the start of final exams Wednesday. It’s also Cinco de Mayo, and there’s warm weather in the forecast. Those factors have all served as catalysts in years past for heavy drinking parties that have brought riot police to downtown Durham.

Peter Dutton via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/pEWwCa

To protect children from predators, some schools have rules against physical contact so strict that students can be sent to the principal’s office for holding hands or high-fiving. On today’s show – are schools being too touchy about physical contact?

And a reporter profiles the inaugural class of Thiel fellows – twenty teenagers who were given one-hundred thousand dollars to drop out of higher education and pursue success as young entrepreneurs.

Plus a columnist and comedian argues college kids today can’t take a joke. 

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Tracy Lee Carroll, NHPR

House lawmakers are considering a measure that aims to create guidelines for election officials to judge a voters domicile. And the secretary of state’s office supports the bill.

The fight over what should constitute domicile for voting purposes has been going on for years in New Hampshire, and it’s often focused status of college students.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Invented Languages: Klingon and Beyond

“I wanted to start teaching this course because I wanted a way to engage students in linguistics without having to actually teach them linguistics.  I wanted a kind of pop-culture back road into linguistics.  Also I’m a huge Star Trek fan.”

Via Plymouth State web site

Plymouth State University is working with a local crisis intervention agency to raise awareness about sexual assault.

The university is partnering with Voices Against Violence to create a bystander intervention policy to help prevent sexual violence and provide support to victims. Similar to programs at the University of New Hampshire and elsewhere, the bystander policy encourages students to safely intervene when they see a risk of danger.

Meg Kennedy-Dugan, director of Voices Against Violence, says her organization will provide resources to students, faculty and staff.

VGo/NHPR Staff

Football faces increasing criticism as mounting evidence shows the dangers of concussions, in particular undiagnosed concussions.

A new telehealth initiative at Dartmouth College aims to eliminate those undiagnosed concussions by bringing neurosurgeons to the sidelines--via robot.

On the sidelines of the Dartmouth/Penn football game, neurosurgeon Robert Singer watches carefully.

"A lot of these hits are shoulder hits. What we’re looking for are direct head to head kind of contact, that type of thing."

How N.H. Colleges Are Fighting Campus Sexual Assault

Sep 18, 2014
no6club / Flickr/CC

With one-in-five women estimated to experience sexual assault while in college, and a large majority of cases unreported, there has been a groundswell recently for better prevention and response, backed recently by a presidential task force. We’ll talk with local colleges and experts on sexual violence about how best to address this problem.

GUESTS:

Sheep photo: Roger Davies via flickr Creative Commons/Modification: Logan Shannon / NHPR

As college kids move back to campus, one Ivy League insider says that elite universities aren’t producing independent thinkers, but high functioning sheep. On today’s show: the downside of being among the best and the brightest. Then, we’ll find out what happens when an innocent college prank turns into a full-blown Wikipedia hoax five years later. Plus, a look at some of the best books coming out this month.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


yalepress.yale.edu

As college costs soar, many see a more vocational higher education as the best way to make the price tag worth it. Others, though, argue in favor of a broad-based education based on critical thinking and intellectual inquiry, rather than strict job preparation. We’re sitting down with Wesleyan University President Michael Roth about his new book "Beyond the University: Why A Liberal Education Matters."

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Plymouth State Drops SAT And ACT Scores For Applicants

Aug 22, 2014

Students applying to Plymouth State University will no longer be required to submit SAT and ACT scores.

The University has decided to step away from the standardized tests, and put more emphasis on a student's high school GPA. Andrew Palumbo, Plymouth's Assistant Vice President of Enrollment Management, says the GPA is simply a better measure of how prepared a student is for college.

Workman Publishing - http://www.workman.com/products/9781612124513/

Throughout her time at Dartmouth, Priya Krishna catalogued inventive twists on dining hall fare for her college newspaper. Shortly after graduation she began gathering together recipes for her new book Ultimate Dining Hall Hacks, which came out in June 2014.

USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab via Flickr

Today on Word of Mouth, invasive species like Zebra Mussels to Asian Carp, are destroying biodiversity across North America. Or are they? Also, we'll look into China’s push to build a frozen food infrastructure. The number of urban Chinese households with a refrigerator has risen from just 7 percent to 95 percent in a decade. We’ll find out what that means for global climate change.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


SigEp NV Alpha '03 / Flickr Creative Commons

For some students pledging that fraternity or sorority is a rite of passage, creating a sense of belonging and friendship on campus.  But after a series of recent ugly incidents - including hazing, binge drinking, and sexual assaults - some colleges are looking harder at Greek organizations and whether some are getting out of control.  We’re examining the big picture, nationally and in New Hampshire.  

GUESTS:

Acumen Fund via flickr Creative Commons

"No man ever steps in the same river twice" - Heraclitus, pre-Socratic Greek philosopher

While the philosophy of Heraclitus and his pre-Socratic peers is debatable, fans of Word of Mouth can attest that they never listen to the same WoM show twice. Ideas change. Concepts Change. Times change. Even when the segments stay the same, the takeaway, the emotion, the value in context of your life can change. Today, we bring you new ideas, old sound with new meaning, and new sound with retrospective importance. So join us, scholars of WoM, for today's show, and share your thoughts on Facebook and Twitter.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments

Runar Eilertsen via flickr Creative Commons

Today's Word of Mouth is chock full of the stories that keep us on our toes. Why would a Crossfit gym sue scientists? Guest Warren Cornwall gives us the scoop. We're also continuing our examination of higher education with two segments: one about the NCAA Pay-for-Play debate; the other about a brain-y college course.

Listen to the full show for these and more, and click Read more for individual segments.

As we start this week's look at higher education in New Hampshire, we thought we would start with a look at how the landscape of higher education is changing – in effect, what’s prompting institutions to change.

Fast Company / Flickr/CC

We kick off A Matter of Degrees, a week-long series on higher education, with what's behind the rising costs of college. Critics blame sports programs, fancy cafeterias, and highly paid professors, but officials say you need to make college attractive, and what students pay now will be returned exponentially in the future. (digital post by Faith Meixell)

GUESTS: 

Brainlesssteel via Flickr CC

As college students prepare to leave New Hampshire and Vermont for summer break, a recent national study raises questions about how many will return in the fall.

The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center says both states rank very high in terms of the percentage of students who graduate within six years of starting at four-year public campuses. But they also rank high in terms of students who finish in another state.

Jared Wickerham/Getty Images

Despite lockouts, replacement referees, and a lawsuit to settle brain trauma-related lawsuits, America's passion for football remains in play. We continues our series Rethink 2014 with America's beloved pastime, football. We begin at the college level, where many professional football careers begin. Critics charge that  that the danger and violence inherent to the game have no place in academic institutions. NPR's program Intelligence Squared U.S.

Courtesy The University Of New Hampshire

A report released this week by the Project on Student Debt shows average student debt among New Hampshire’s college graduates increased slightly last year.

Pigeonpie via Flickr Creative Commons

At the height of the recession, the Class of 2011 was taking PSATs and perusing college brochures. What is it like to make plans for your future in a country whose economic future is uncertain?

To find out, we talk to four former students of Pembroke Academy: Matthew Lindsay, junior at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Sarah Kelley, junior at University of New Hampshire; Hannah David, junior at University of New Hampshire; and Kali Mara, senior at Plymouth State University

Barks Of Love / Flickr Creative Commons

We continue our series, 'How We Work: Five Years Later,' with a look at younger Granite Staters and how they’re prepared for the workforce.  We’ll examine how we educate students, from high school to college, and how that’s changed since the recession.

GUESTS:

With new calls for accountability and transparency on placement numbers and returns on investment, colleges are working to ensure that students see their degrees – and the money they put toward them – as worthwhile, not only in the programs and courses they offer, but in the services students can use to find meaningful work.

The career services office has been a longtime fixture on most campuses, but what goes on in that office is changing as the job market becomes more complex – and, for many, more challenging.

alltogetherfool via flickr Creative Commons

If you don’t have the scratch to buy 10 million stamps, maybe selling seats in college courses is an easier way to make a buck … Joel Eastwood of the Toronto Star, wrote about savvy students at the University of Toronto registering for classes and then selling those spots to students who need that particular course but can’t get in through the normal registration process.

401(k)_2013 via flickr Creative Commons

President Obama has put colleges on notice – if tuition does not stop rising, federal financing will drop. And he’s laid out proposals addressing both affordability and accountability. Some say this attention is long overdue, but others warn of unintended consequences. We’ll talk with leaders in New Hampshire higher-education about these issues in the state.

GUESTS:

Saint Huck via flickr Creative Commons

The quagmire that is student loan debt has finally surpassed credit card debt in America. We’ve heard a lot about what this level of debt means to college graduates, drop-outs and families but now we’re going to dig a little deeper into the “loan” part. What a student signs up for looks, feels and sounds like a loan…but doesn’t fine-print like a loan. Decisions made by congress in recent decades have rendered traditional loan safeguards such as bankruptcy filing, inaccessible to borrowers. David Dayen is a freelance writer and contributor to salon, where we found his article, “Your Student Loan Isn’t Really a Loan.”

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