College

Sheryl Rich-Kern, NHPR

As college costs rise around the country, some small private colleges are finding a new way to attract students—by offering financial incentives.  Some are offering discounts. Others are freezing tuition.  But New England College in Henniker has come up with its own plan to attract a wider range of students.

Beginning this May, it’s offering a year-round academic calendar, allowing students to save money by graduating in three years instead of four.

angelamaphone via flickr Creative Commons

In his first term, President Obama boosted Pell grants and reformed federal financial aid in hopes of increasing college access for low-income students.  Despite these efforts, there is another problem preventing the less privileged from getting an education – a disconnect between poor families, and the arcane bureaucracy surrounding the admissions process.

Sarah Carr is author of the new book Hope Against Hope: Three Schools, One City, and the Struggle to Educate America’s Children.”  An excerpt from that book featured in The Atlantic tells the story of one New Orleans high school’s efforts to bridge the admissions process gap.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/83633410@N07/7658298768/in/photostream/">CollegeDegrees360</a> / Flickr

In this episode, Stephen Dubner breaks down the costs and benefits of going to college, especially during an economy that's leaving a lot of people un- and underemployed. The data say that college graduates make a lot more money in the long run and enjoy a host of other benefits as well. But does that justify the time and money? We'll hear from economists David Card, Betsey Stevenson, and Justin Wolfers, as well as former Bush advisor Karl Rove, who made it to the White House without a college degree.

NH DOE

The New Hampshire Department of Education says that in the past decade there has been a 6 percent increase in the number of high school graduates continuing on to college, but also a five percent increase in the number of high schoolers leaving the state for college.

Sheryl Rich-Kern

With the high costs of tuition, many students with an associate’s degree can’t afford to go on for their bachelor’s.  So in 2011, when one non-profit college in Salem began offering students their third year of college free, some considered the deal a godsend.

kcadams via Flickr/Creative Commons

Recruitment from other countries is a rising trend in Higher Education as a way to diversify campuses and bring in money to financially strapped institutions.  It’s also become a big business, raising questions about the way in which students are brought in.  We take a look at this practice and how it’s evolving here in the Granite State.

Guests

Fewer than 5 percent of Americans had completed college when historian James Truslow Adams first coined the term "American dream" in 1931.

Today, many consider higher education the gateway to a better, richer and fuller life. But for many kids growing up in poverty, college might as well be Mars, and the American dream a myth.

Photo be Clark Gregor, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

An increasingly common anxiety for freshly-minted undergraduates is finding a job in their field with a decent enough salary to pay off their student loans. For those with new advanced degrees, the stakes are even higher...  2008 figures from The Center for College Affordability and Productivity estimate that 16% of those qualified to be college professors, lawyers, and doctors are working jobs at the high school graduate level. Helping wayward professionals put their highly-trained brains to work, is Jon F.

CHARLES WHEELAN, professor at Dartmouth College and the University of Chicago and is author of 10 ½ Things No Commencement Speaker Has Ever Said and Naked Economics, veered off the motivational script when addressing the 2011 class at Dartmouth, telling the graduates “your worst days lie ahead.”

Wheelan on Talk of the Nation

photo by Tulane Public Relations via Flickr

By some estimates, U.S. college debt has hit a staggering one trillion dollars.  And New Hampshire students are first in the nation when it comes to the average debt burden. Some blame colleges and universities for hiking tuition. Others blame states for steep funding cuts.  Meanwhile, many say our entire higher education system needs a serious financial overhaul.

 

Guests:

Hundreds of thousands of veterans have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan in recent years, eager to get an education under the new post-Sept. 11 GI Bill.

Many vets looking for a school find they are inundated by sales pitches from institutions hungry for their government benefits. Now, lawmakers are looking for ways to protect vets without narrowing their education choices.

(Photo by Runs with Scissors via Flickr Creative Commons)

The average college graduate today will walk away tens of thousands in debt, fewer job opportunities and lower relative wages than previous generations.  While some students increase their post-college chances by majoring in trending fields like science and engineering – others follow less practical paths in the study of  philosophy, religion…and cartooning.  Yup, cartooning.  

Fast Company’s annual list of the world’s 50 Most Innovative Companies included many of the usual suspects: Apple, Facebook and Google all made the list.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/redjar/113560003/in/photostream/" target="blank">redjar</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

Officials at Dartmouth College say they’re taking new steps to deal with hazing on campus, especially in fraternities. That issue turned into a campus-wide controversy earlier this year, after Dartmouth senior Andrew Lohse published a piece in the student newspaper describing what he called “dehumanizing” hazing rituals in his fraternity, Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/auvet/4864672208/in/photostream/" target="blank">jimmywayne</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

The phrase “first in the nation” is the shorthand we use for talking about the New Hampshire presidential primary coming before any other.

New Hampshire is first among states in other ways, too. Some are good – like having the lowest rate of child poverty among states. Some are not so good – like having the highest student debt load in America.

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