Concord

Todd Bookman/NHPR

An unassuming brick building in Concord now carries the name of one of the most tireless promoters of the state’s arts and cultural assets.

On Tuesday afternoon, friends, relatives and lawmakers gathered in the shade of a large tree for a bill signing and dedication ceremony of the Van McLeod Building, the new formal name for the offices of the state’s Department of Cultural Resources on Pillsbury Street. McLeod, who died last summer at the age of 70, served as Commissioner of the Department for 24 years.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Some late season snow and a string of decent weather in New Hampshire are creating a bumper crop of strawberries in backyards and on farms this year. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Seventy years after his death, the life and accomplishments of John Gilbert Winant were honored Friday during a statue dedication ceremony in Concord.

Complete with a military band, prominent politicians and no shortage of cameras, it was just the kind of show Winant would have hated.

Courtesy of St. Paul's School

John Gilbert Winant is the most famous New Hampshire politician you may never have heard of.

Quiet and humble, he was a decorated soldier, three-term Governor, and eventually, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom during World War II. But his tragic death, in many ways, has always overshadowed his life.  

Samantha Fogel

Tonight at midnight, Concord Steam Corporation will turn off its boilers and close its doors. The plant provided heat in Concord for nearly 80 years.

Every other year, the organization Building On Hope rallies together hundreds of people to renovate a community organization's space. 

This time, the organization chose Crisis Center of Central New Hampshire, in Concord. It’s an emergency shelter for domestic violence and other survivors of abuse. Board member E.J. Powers says the project is "In the spirit of yankee barn raisings from many generations ago."

He says builders, architects, painters, designers, and everyday people will volunteer their time, and sometimes, their money.

Apartment Building Fire Displaces Dozens in Concord

Mar 13, 2017
Jack Rodolico for NHPR

About 30 people, including four children, have been displaced after a fire ripped through their Concord apartment building Sunday evening.

The Concord Fire Department says a cigarette started the blaze, which damaged three or four apartments but then cut power off to the entire building, about 30 apartments.

Jennifer D'Entremont says it was close to midnight when she took her eight-year old son into the cold in their pajamas.

Jack Rodolico

With snow and sub-zero temperatures projected across New Hampshire for the next few nights, the city of Concord is still without a winter shelter for its homeless residents. The shelter is slated to open soon, but not by Thursday night, when the temperature is expected to plummet. 

Sean Hurley

There might not be any snow on the ground, but that doesn’t mean you can’t start getting into the holiday spirit.  Premiering tonight at the Hatbox Theater, a new adaptation of Charles Dickens classic, “A Christmas Carol”.  NHPR’s Sean Hurley went to a dress rehearsal of the show and is happy to report that Scrooge is alive and well and living in Concord – at least for the next two weeks.  

Sam Evans-Brown

  The utility that provides steam heat for the New Hampshire Statehouse and a number of other state government facilities is shutting down. 

By Wikicali00 - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30680721

For many people under the age of 25, the Steeplegate Mall in Concord, New Hampshire is a landmark of the city. But, its early days were marked by uncertainty. In July 1990, the mall opened with the goal of providing a convenient shopping experience for New Hampshire residents, without overshadowing the businesses and atmosphere of Main Street.

NHPR Staff

The fate of a unique industrial building in New Hampshire could be decided soon.

The 1888 Concord gasholder is believed to be the last of its kind in the United States with its interior works intact. Retired state architectural historian Jim Garvin says gasholders changed America. The new lighting fuel technology meant businesses could run three shifts and people could read, gather and walk the streets deep into the night.

Sean Hurley

As construction in downtown Concord continues, a group of local filmmakers is making use of the transition from old to new in their fictional film, "Granite Orpheus," an updated and largely improvised take on the story of Orpheus, the musician and poet who tries and fails to retrieve the love of his life from the underworld. 

In the dusty, barely lit basement of Zoe & Company Professional Bra Fitters, Rick Broussard is getting ready for the third day of shooting, which takes places in the streets, alleys, squares, basements and rooftops of the capital city. 

Dave Fairburn via Facebook

Interstate 93 northbound in Concord is expected to be closed for several hours due to a sinkhole.

Department of Transportation spokesman Bill Boynton says the report came in just after noon, and no injuries were reported.

"The hole is about 20 feet deep, 12 feet long, and 14 feet wide, so a major hole in hole road there that has shutdown northbound traffic," Boynton said.   

He says the DOT and private construction companies are working to address the problem.

Sean Hurley

As construction in downtown Concord continues, a group of local filmmakers is making use of the transition from old to new in their fictional film, "Granite Orpheus", an updated and improvised take on the Greek Myth set in the streets, alleys, squares, basements and rooftops of the capital city.  NHPR's Sean Hurley spent a night on the town with the film's cast and crew and sends us this.

"Let's power up the cameras. We ready to shoot the rehearsals?"

8.04.15: Tattoos & Lists of Note

Aug 4, 2015
Megan Tan for NHPR

Grocery lists, to-do lists, guest lists – human beings are compelled to put things into manageable order…and sometimes the result is anything but mundane. Today we look at some of the most memorable lists ever written – from Walt Disney’s un-used dwarf names, to a day in the life of country legend Johnny Cash. Plus, we’ll talk about tattoos in the workplace, and how gender stereotypes play into how people perceive ink.

Josh Rogers

A water main break near New Hampshire's State House has flooded Main Street, where construction crews have been working on renovations.

The street had been partially closed off Tuesday morning as construction workers continued digging for the Concord Main Street Project.

It wasn't immediately known what caused the water main break.

A groundbreaking ceremony to mark the project is scheduled for Monday, April 20.

Chris Campbell via Flickr CC

The U.S. Marshals Service says residents in the Concord, New Hampshire, area have been getting calls in a scam about having to pay hundreds of dollars for failing to appear for federal jury duty.

Richard Roche via Flickr CC

New Hampshire officials are issuing a thin ice warning for area ponds after a Concord city worker rescued a man from a pond in a city park.

On Christmas Eve, Concord Parks and Recreation employee Tom Wright noticed a young man struggling in vain to get out of the icy waters of a pond in White Park.

Officials say the man went out on the icy to rescue his dog, which had fallen through about 30 feet from shore. He managed to get his dog back onto the ice but couldn't pull himself up or break a path through the ice.

Wright ran into the pond and pulled the man to safety.

Mass. Office of Travel & Tourism Via Flickr CC

According to the latest study of the so-called Capital Rail Corridor released last night by the New Hampshire Rail Transit Authority running commuter rail from Manchester to Boston would cost $246 million dollars, and attract at least 650,000 riders per year.

Many in a standing-room-only audience in Nashua were ready to forge ahead with expanding train service, but the study will likely face a chillier reception in other parts of the state.

Courtesy image/Manchester PD

Governor Maggie Hassan has declared a state of emergency in the wake of more than 40 synthetic marijuana overdose cases since Monday.

Synthetic cannabinoids, also known as spice, has been linked to a jump in overdoses in Manchester and Concord. The powers of Governor Hassan’s executive order to seize the drug sold ostensibly as incense in corner stores, applies only to the bubblegum-flavored variety of a brand called ‘Smacked!.’ Health Commissioner Nick Toumpas says other brands called ‘Green Giant’ and ‘Crazy Monkey’ may also be dangerous.

Jack Rodolico for NHPR

When all the construction is finally done, Interstate 93 will be wider. And that could be a growth opportunity for central New Hampshire, long viewed as a forgotten sliver of the state.

But how much growth is possible in central New Hampshire, and how much do those communities even want to grow?

On summer evenings, Tom Fredenburg spends time on his dock. He’s lived on Snow Pond in the northern tip of Concord since 1979. "This was the boondocks. It was a schlep to get into Concord," he says.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

A district court judge set deadline of 4 p.m. Friday for tenants to vacate a condemned building in downtown Concord.

The order gave tenants a few more hours to collect their belongings before city health officials clear the Vegas Block on North Main Street. (Scroll down to read the order, embedded below.)

New Hampshire Legal Assistance filed an emergency lawsuit on behalf of the tenants Friday morning, after they were told they had to vacate the building by noon that day.

Tenants in a building across the street from New Hampshire's State House have been told to move out because of numerous fire and safety code violations.

Fifteen to 20 people live in apartments in the Vegas Block on North Main Street in Concord. They were given about 24 hours' notice to leave by noon Friday.

Violations include holes in the walls, broken smoke detectors and locks, missing plumbing fixtures, cockroaches and bedbugs.

Concord Main Street Project Approved

Jul 31, 2014
Timothy Valentine via Flickr cc

Construction on a $10 million revamp of Concord’s downtown will begin this fall, after the City Council voted 14-1 to approve the project at a meeting this week.

The rebuild and redesign of Concord’s downtown will affect nine blocks of Main Street, from Centre Street to Concord Street.

At-Large City Councilor Fred Keach says the goal is to keep disruption during construction to a minimum for downtown businesses.

From MainStreetConcord.com

The Concord City Council is meeting tonight to vote on whether to spend more than $10 million revitalizing its Main Street corridor.

For nearly two decades, Concord has debated the pros and cons of redesigning and rebuilding nine blocks of Main Street.

Pedestrian friendly and aesthetically pleasing plans to revamp downtown are up for a vote in the City Council. At-Large Councilman Mark Coen supports the project. And says Concord is the latest in a long list of communities to explore such changes.

jbspec7 via Flickr CC

New Hampshire is often advertised as a state filled with natural attractions, famous for our mountains (Mt. Washington and Mt. Monadnock are both known world-wide), lakes, and rivers. But the state is filled with historical landmarks as well, which Lucie Bryar covers in her book Exploring Southern New Hampshire: History and Nature on Back Roads and Quiet Waters. Here are some of the cultural attractions in southern NH you may not have heard about, but that you’ll definitely want to check out.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

The 40th annual Market Days is underway in Concord.

The event runs through Saturday and tents will line Main Street with sidewalk sales, food vendors, live music, and other activities.

Stephanie Green of Hopkinton comes every year, and says the three-day event creates a real sense of community.

“And it’s just nice to see people using the downtown. I’m always commenting about how the nice thing about Concord is that is really does have a thriving downtown, which so many communities no longer have.”

Molly Donahue

Back in 2013, downtown Concord, NH welcomed a new, unusual, addition. Yoyo Heaven is owned and operated by the father and son team Andy and Dan McBride, and it’s exactly what you could expect from the name. They sell assorted ‘skill toys,’ anything that engages people physically and can help build coordination, but the focus is on yoyos. They sell a wide range of yoyos and prices range from $5 to more than $200, and are more than willing to explain the different attributes of all of them.

gcaserotti via Flickr CC

With their shaven heads, combat boots and bomber jackets, neo-Nazis used to be pretty easy to pick out of a crowd. Today, not so much. We explore why Europe’s young hyper-nationalists are opting for a more hipster look. Plus, common sense tells us that reading to children is good for them, but it’s more powerful than you might imagine. We’ll look into the practice of interactive reading and share tricks for bringing up book worms in the age of screens and digital devices. And, not all princesses are polite and demure. We remember some princesses for their bad behavior.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


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