Conservation

Scott Heron; Flickr

For many Granite Staters, these creatures symbolize what makes our wild places special, but both face threats that are reducing their numbers. We'll discuss these threats, and ongoing efforts to support these animals.


Photo courtesy of Chris Connors

Residents of Warner and surroundings towns have requested to place the Warner River under a state environmental protection program. 

The Warner River is a favorite location for trout fisherman and kayakers. Joining New Hampshire's River Management and Protection Program would mean that people who live near the river will have a say in conserving it.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will discuss federal funds for state-level conservation efforts at an event at the Bass Pro Shop in Hooksett Tuesday.

Scientists who study the environment keep track of the number and variety of plants and animals in a region—they call that biodiversity. Studies show biodiversity is plummeting worldwide due to human activity, and understanding why biodiversity matters now could help us stop the loss.

NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with David Brooks, who writes the Granite Geek column for the Concord Monitor, about the importance of biodiversity.

In your column, you make an analogy between biodiversity and capitalism. Can you elaborate on that?

Ross Boyd

Something Wild recently visited Maria Colby, director of Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Henniker.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services / Flickr/CC

There’s no way around it. This week, Something Wild is a little thick. Like hundreds of pages thick but stay with us.

  

  

  The New Hampshire State Conservation Committee has awarded nearly $290,000 in "Moose Plate" grants to 18 municipalities and conservation organizations that emphasize natural resource preservation.

Eligible grant applicants include county conservation districts, municipalities, qualified conservation nonprofit organizations, county cooperative extension natural resource programs, public and private schools, and scout groups.

The program is funded through the purchase of Conservation License Plates, known as "Moose Plates."

Via LondonderryTrails.org

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services has awarded funding of $2.4 million for 20 projects protecting wetlands.

Two projects, both getting $400,000, will conserve land. The first would go toward the conservation of 1,870 acres including Tower Hill pond in Hooksett and Candia. It will conserve 45 separate wetlands encompassing 280 acres, over two miles of undeveloped shoreline, forest, and other areas.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Population growth on New Hampshire’s Seacoast has led to rising real estate prices that can often mean more tax revenue for towns in the region. But three Seacoast towns are finding it can make fiscal sense to forego development in favor of conservation.

Among the presidential candidates, environmental issues haven’t gotten much play this campaign season.

Here in New Hampshire, that’s not quite the case, especially in the gubernatorial race where issues like Northern Pass, solar and wind energy and high energy costs have helped shape the campaign.

The Naturalist: Theodore Roosevelt

Jun 16, 2016

No U.S. president is more associated with nature and wildlife than Teddy Roosevelt... hunter, adventurer, and conservationist.  We'll sit down with Darrin Lunde, the author of a new book on our twenty-sixth president,  delving into his early interest in "museum naturalism" and how his legacy resonates today.  

This program was hosted by Dean Spiliotes, Civic Scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at Southern New Hampshire University.


Something Wild takes pride in introducing to the residents of the state to the wonder in the wild that surrounds us all. Someone who discovered that wonder at a young age is David Carroll, “I was 8 years old when I had that experience with the first spotted turtle.” Naturalist, writer, artist are among the many descriptors frequently attached to Carroll’s name.

Something Wild recently visited Maria Colby, director of Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Henniker.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services / Flickr/CC

There’s no way around it. This week, Something Wild is a little thick. Like hundreds of pages thick but stay with us.

N.H.'s New Ten-Year Action Wildlife Plan

Dec 3, 2015
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services / Flickr/CC

The state's new ten-year wildlife action plan was announced last month, laying out priorities for New Hampshire's natural resources and critters. We'll look into what the plan entails, and how its used in towns weighing conservation against other considerations.

Guests:

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

  In Londonderry, bush-whacking through some seriously thick brush, Fish and Game field biologists Brett Ferry and Tyler Mahard are hunting for rabbits, but instead of firearms they’re using traps and radio telemetry.

They will take blood samples and put radio collars on rabbits they capture to ensure that we will continue to have a good idea of the state of the threatened rabbit population, and a few will be sent to a captive breeding program at a zoo in Rhode Island.

Dave Delay/flickr

Projects in eight New Hampshire communities have been awarded federal Land and Water Conservation grants totaling $930,000.

The projects being funded are aimed at promoting outdoor recreation and conservation.

The town of Nelson of will use $150,000 to acquire 588 acres of land for a town forest.

And the city of Concord will use its $100,000 grant to develop trails and a boardwalk at Terrill Park.

 

About $230,000 is available for 2016 Conservation "Moose Plate" grant applications through the New Hampshire State Conservation Committee.

Eligible applicants include municipalities, county conservation districts, nonprofits involved in conservation programs, public and private schools, county cooperative extension natural resource programs, and scout groups.

The deadline for applying is Sept. 25. Awards will be announced in December, and funding will be available in April 2016.

Giving Matters: Bear Paw Conserves, Land, Water and Space

Jun 19, 2015
NHPR/Rich-Kern

Bear-Paw Regional Greenways is a land trust that protects important wildlife habitat in southern New Hampshire. Its work in Hooksett has helped to double the amount of conserved land in that town, including ponds, trails, and rare species habitat.

Something Wild takes pride in introducing to the residents of the state to the wonder in the wild that surrounds us all. Someone who discovered that wonder at a young age is David Carroll, “I was 8 years old when I had that experience with the first spotted turtle.” Naturalist, writer, artist are among the many descriptors frequently attached to Carroll’s name.

The Future Of Ski Expansion at Mount Sunapee

Apr 27, 2015
Kelsey Ohman / Flickr/cc

The state-owned park is beloved for both its mountain and lake. But the private company that owns the ski operation has long wanted to expand.  Now, the state has given preliminary approval, setting off a process of review and hearings and raising a larger conversation about balancing natural beauty with economic development.

Giving Matters: Prescott Farms Gets Kids Outside

Mar 21, 2015
Courtesy Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center

The Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center offers year-round programs for all ages. Its “Wildquest” camps help connect kids with nature and their local landscapes. 

Prescott Farm has always been a landmark for Gretchen O’Neill. “We’re very grateful that our daughter, Gabriella, can come here to attend the camp, or that we can come up and explore it and walk the trails.

Paul Cooper via Flickr CC

A total of $1.3 million in grants is going to 13 Connecticut River projects in New Hampshire and Vermont to improve water quality, restore habitat and conserve space.

The New Hampshire Charitable Foundation grants were announced Tuesday.

A fund dedicated to the restoration and protection of the river, its wetlands and shorelands is expected to provide about $21 million for the projects over 20 years.

Jeff Finn / Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/44459766@N02/6385935213

It was a record year for red-bellied woodpeckers in New Hampshire. That's the word from New Hampshire's birders as the international Christmas Bird Count tradition comes to a close.

Overall, bird enthusiasts from 21 regions across the state are reporting both high individual bird counts, and high species counts.  

Via Wikimedia Commons

The state has handed out grants to 36 historic, cultural, and land conservation projects as part of its Land and Community Heritage Investment Program.

The grants range from about $7,500 to study Jones Hall in Marlow to $400,000 to permanently protect 1,114 acres in Epping.

This year's recipients include 26 historic properties from the 1764 Park Hill Meeting House in Westmoreland to the 1918 Peterborough Town House. There are also 10 natural resource projects providing permanent protection of almost 3,000 acres in all of the state's 10 counties.

Giving Matters: Preserving NH's Land

Nov 15, 2014
Courtesy NE Wilderness Trust

Fred and Rosalind Slavic built their home on a thickly wooded site in Fitzwilliam a half century ago. They wanted their 300-acre tract to remain in a wild state, so they have willed it to the Northeast Wilderness Trust. The trust will dismantle the buildings and retain an easement on the land.

Emily Hoyer / Flicker CC

A new study from the University of New Hampshire and Fish and Game finds that the state’s bobcat population has rebounded substantially.

Bobcats were hunted and trapped all the way through 1989, when the cats became so scarce that the state ended bobcat hunting. Back then there were estimated to be fewer than 200 bobcats in the state. Today, the new study estimates there could be as many as 800 to 1,200 of the elusive felines.

The study didn’t ask the question of what factors are leading to the recovery, and there is almost certainly more than one.

Saving The World's Wild Cats

Aug 7, 2014
Jens Hauser / Flickr/CC

Although at the top of the food chain, “apex predators" such as tigers, jaguars, and mountain lions face threats as varied as poachers, habitat destruction, and climate change. We’ll sit down with a leading expert to talk about this, how his efforts tie into a broader conservation movement, and the big cats in our own backyards.

GUEST:

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

One of the state’s biggest environmental organizations is finishing the fundraising for a 1,300 acre conservation deal in North Conway. Once it’s finished, the land will be added to the 4,000 existing acres of the Nature Conservancy’s Green Hills Preserve, where it will provide recreation for people, and habitat for plants and animals.

But before the conservancy closes the deal it wants to know what it’s getting, and to figure that out it assembled plant and wildlife experts from all over the state for a sort of naturalist marathon.

Michael Samuels

 

A big part of farming and conservation is finding creative solutions on a budget.

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