constitution

(Photo by <a href'="http://www.flickr.com/photos/tswartz/402696142/">Tony Swartz </a>via Flickr Creative Commons)

  New Hampshire may join several other states who are considering calling for a federal constitutional convention.

The House Committee on State-Federal Relations and Veteran Affairs voted to support two of four bills that would call for a convention under Article V of the U.S. Constitution.

One of the bills backed by the committee targets campaign finance issues brought on by the U.S. Supreme Court decision in the Citizens United case.

Calls from 34 states or a two-thirds vote in Congress is needed for a constitutional convention to take place.

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Our legal system seems to be struggling with how to interpret the Constitution when it comes to today’s technology -- from threats made on social media to whether police need a warrant to search a smartphone. We’ll look at the debate over how to apply principles established more than two centuries ago to our high-tech society. 

GUESTS:

Flickr: InAweofGod'sCreation

  Some things never change in New Hampshire – including our position as a battleground state. In 1788, eight colonies had ratified the constitution – but nine were needed to establish the United States of America.

Stephanie Seacord, with Strawbery Banke Museum, says New Hampshire was split. "There were two factions in NH," she says.  One, wanted to stay independent, the other hoped to join the union. The latter was largely based in Portsmouth and led by then-Governor John Langdon.

Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr/CC

Two recent U.S. Supreme Court cases and plethora of state legislative debates have once again raised questions about what we mean by religious freedom: from whether contraception coverage should mandated, to prayer in public meetings, to private businesses objecting to serving same-sex couples. 

GUESTS: 

Mike Lavoie, copyright 2013

Here’s a topic guaranteed to get a big laugh…the Constitution.

The national tour of comedian Colin Quinn Unconstitutional, is stopping at The Colonial Theater in Keene this Friday. Quinn, after all, made the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal funny as anchor of Weekend Update on Saturday Night Live, and has now condensed the Constitution’s history into a witty 75-minute one-man play. His new show finds the humor in how the right and the left argue over the meanings and interpretations of the Constitution.

mailemae59 / Flickr Creative Commons

As another debt ceiling deadline looms, on top of a government shutdown, we’ll look at what our nation’s defining document, particularly the fourteenth amendment, says about federal debt, as well as the roles of Congress and the President. 

GUESTS:

757Live via Flickr Creative Commons

The Constitution gives Congress the right to declare war and the President to wage it. Yet many presidents have taken military action, without involving lawmakers. President Obama’s recent decision to seek Congressional support for intervention in Syria has renewed debate over when and how we engage our military.  

Guests:

  • Buzz Scherr – Professor at UNH School of Law in Concord
  • Linda L. Fowler - Professor of Government and the Frank J. Reagan Chair in Policy Studies at Dartmouth College     

The 10th Amendment reserves powers not delegated to the federal government back to the states. But where the line between federal and state power lies has been debated for centuries, including recent debates over gay marriage, gun rights and abortion.  We’ll take stock of the Tenth Amendment, and the implications for policy that flow from it.

Guests

kalavinka via flickr Creative Commons

A case in Wisconsin is testing the limits of the Fifth Amendment in the digital age. In January, the FBI seized 20 terabytes of hard drives from Jeffrey Feldman, a man accused possessing underage pornography – but could only decrypt 20% of it. Until last week, a federal court judge had placed the burden on the defendant to decrypt the rest or face charges of contempt. Last week, his attorney successfully argued an emergency motion to extend that deadline. She claims that asking Feldman to decrypt files that would be used against him in the case is a violation of his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. Declan McCullagh is chief political correspondent and senior writer for C-Net and has been following the story.

It’s relatively short, only twenty-seven words, but long on controversy.  And it’s recently resurfaced in our debates over gun rights and gun control.  We’ll pick apart the language of the second amendment with two constitutional scholars and examine what our founding fathers may have really meant, and how we look at it, in our time. 

Guests:

Roger Wood / NHPR

Today, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and her husband launched a political action committee with a goal of countering the influence of the gun lobby. the new PAC leverages public calls for stricter gun controls following the Sandy Hook shooting last month.

We look at what our nation’s most important document, the Constitution, says and doesn’t say about elections. There’s some debate over who should write the rules, the federal or state governments, also who exactly can cast a ballot and if voting is a right or a privilege.  We’ll talk with those involved in new civics program called “Constitutionally speaking”. 

Guests

TBA

(Please) Stand for the Pledge of Allegiance

Feb 14, 2012
Flickr Creative Commons/Just Some Dust

A bill requiring New Hampshire students to stand during the Pledge of Allegiance passed a house committee today.

"Standing is a sign of national patriotism," says Republican Representative Lawrence Kappler.

Current law permits students to remain seated, as long as they are silent and respectful. The constitutionality of the bill is in question, however. Representative Gary Richardson believes that requiring someone to stand is clearly an issue of free speech. 

11/26/11 PART 2

Nov 26, 2011
Photo by Marsmet523, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Jay Wexler's new book and blog focus on the odd Constitutional clauses we should, maybe, focus on a little less... and those we should, perhaps, turn into awesome t-shirts.

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/roemerman/444304025/">Steven Roerman </a>via Flickr Creative Commons)

Jay Wexler's new book and blog focus on the odd Constitutional clauses we should, maybe, focus on a little less...and those we should, perhaps, turn into awesome t-shirts.