corrections

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Increasingly, corrections officials are looking to statistics to inform their decisions around all aspects of prison practices. As NHPR's Emily Corwin recently reported, inmates’ gender and trauma statistics are helping inform the design of the state’s new women's prison in Concord.

As of Tuesday, $245 million dollars in capital projects are on the way in New Hampshire, now that Governor Maggie Hassan signed the capital budget into law. The biggest line item in that budget is a $38 million dollar new women’s prison.

The prison will be located next to the mens’ prison, in Concord.   Jeff Lyons with the Department of Corrections says that’s for certain.  But what the prison will look like, and who will build it? That, Lyons says, is yet to be decided:

2013 is a year in which New Hampshire Commissioner of Corrections, William Wrenn will face some considerable challenges.  Facilities are packed, jobs have been cut, there's the on going problem of recidivism, and a huge debate over the privatization or partial privatization of prisons.  Add to that, a lawsuit filed last August against the State suggesting that women inmates aren't receiving the same treatment and access to services as their male counterparts.  Today we sit down with Commissioner Wrenn about this and take your calls.

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Alternative Sentencing Program Faces Verdict

Feb 22, 2012

Recovering alcoholics can usually pinpoint their rock-bottom. For Michael Hagar, it was the night of July 28, 2009. That evening, he met up with some friends to drink behind the Hannaford’s supermarket in Keene. 

“And that is where the whole incident took off from,” said Hagar.

Behind the grocery story, Hagar believes he drank about 18 beers. Then someone jumped him, hitting him in the face with a log. His pants and wallet were stolen. Gushing blood and enraged, he staggered into the store's parking lot.