craft beer

spin-glish.com/vocabulary

As new contenders join the 2016 presidential race, the flood of stump speeches and political spin can be overwhelming. On today’s show we’ll talk to a comedy writer who has mastered the art of translating deliberately deceptive double-speak: from politics, to real-estate, to food.

Plus, we’ll hear about a class action lawsuit against blue moon, charging that the self-described “artfully crafted” brew is not really a craft beer.

Sean Hurley

Norman Collins was famous for tattooing sailors. He hopped trains as a kid, joined the Navy, and set up an ink shop in Honolulu where he earned the nickname "Sailor Jerry".  When he died in 1973, he had no idea that one day there'd be a spiced rum with his name on it.

"Here's to life outside the lines. Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum."

In 1999, Steve Grasse helped turn Sailor Jerry the man into Sailor Jerry the brand.

"Sailor Jerry is a huge hit."

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Smuttynose Brewing Company's new brewery opens Saturday in Hampton, NH.  Below is an audio postcard in which Smuttynose's "Master of Propoganda," JT Thompson, gives a tour of the $24 million energy efficient brewery, which produces 65,000 barrels of beer each day.

Adam McCune for NHPR

In the late '90s, craft beer saw a renaissance of sorts. After years of nondescript light beers almost completely dominating the market, tastes seemed to wake up. Breweries and brew-pubs started up almost overnight. A boom was born.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

Last week I tagged along with a man in Weare who’s tapping black birch trees for their sap. While its syrup is not as sweet as maple syrup, it can be an unexpected and tasty ingredient in home-brewed beer.


New Hampshire’s food system is growing and changing, and that means old jobs are evolving. Farmers, for example, are doing marketing and media along with planting and harvesting. And there are new jobs in the food system as well, including this one: Hotel Beer Master.

James Lee via flickr Creative Commons

Fall is a good time for beer lovers. With the crisp air, light-bodied lagers and shandies are swept off the shelves to make way for dark and amber ales along with multiple versions of October-fest brews... For beer lovers wishing to combine a fall foliage tour with sampling the wares at one of the state’s many breweries, New Hampshire Magazine is here to help.  “The Beer Lovers’ Guide to the Granite State”, a comprehensive guide to enjoying New Hampshire’s local beer industry is now online.  Erica Thoits is assistant editor for New Hampshire Magazine.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Recently Bon Appetit magazine posted a list of its 10 Favorite US nanobreweries – those are very small-scale commercial breweries that produce fewer than 2000 barrels a year.

On that top 10 list? Throwback Brewery in North Hampton, New Hampshire.

It’s yet another sign that the Granite State is a big player in the small brewery movement.

Smuttynose Breaking Ground on Hampton Facility

Aug 16, 2012

Smuttynose Brewery breaks ground tonight on its new facility in Hampton about 10 miles down the coast from its current location in Portsmouth.

Smuttynose says it’s moving to Hampton to support its growth.

The brewery has been creating craft beers in New Hampshire since 1994. After the company produced 15,000 barrels in 2006, its status changed from a ‘micro-brewery’ to a ‘regional independent brewery.’

But Smuttynose president, Peter Egelston, says there’s more to the move than acquiring more space.

It's a good time to brew beer in America. According to beer expert Julia Herz, U.S. brewing isn't just on the upswing, it's on top. "We're now the No. 1 destination for beer, based on diversity and amount of beers," she says.

But if you want to see the strength of America's beer industry, you may want to look past beverage giants like Anheuser-Busch and MillerCoors. According to the Brewers Association, nearly 2,000 American brewers operated during 2011 — the most since the 1880s.

Mead in New Hampshire

Mar 29, 2012
Photo by Todd Bookman for NHPR

Starting a small business is always a challenge.  Starting a meadery? Yeah, that’s not easy either. Just ask Michael Fairbrother

“I talk to people about mead, and they go, ‘What kind of meat do you make?’ I’m like, ‘No, I don’t make meat. I make mead.’ And they don’t understand what that is.”

In 2010, Fairbrother opened Moonlight Meadery in Londonderry, NH.

He’s more than happy to explain that mead is a wine made from honey, not grapes. And like traditional wine, you can’t rush it.