Crime

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Identifying potential terrorists is crucial to thwarting future attacks. The challenge is discerning real threats from bravado. Today on the show, how do security analysts survey thoughts?

Then, we’ll learn about two young men who embarked on a bold crime spree, stealing thousands of dollars worth of gold and weapons right in front of their victims…the hitch? It all went down in a video game.

A former Republican state representative who was arrested in connection with alleged voter fraud during New Hampshire's presidential primary has been arraigned on witness tampering and bribery charges.

Foster's Daily Democrat reports Don Leeman of Rochester appeared in Strafford County Superior Court on Wednesday. He remains out on bail.

The attorney general's office says Leeman, who resigned in May, was representing and voted in a district in which he was no longer domiciled during the February primary.

Police in Manchester were forced to deploy tear gas to resolve an hours-long standoff initiated by a man who threatened to shoot first responders.

The incident began after authorities were called to a Krakow Street apartment on Wednesday for a wellness check on an unidentified man, who police described as "despondent."

The man initially refused to open his door for the property manager, who told police that he noticed a foul smell coming from the apartment and could see plastic bottles through a window.

Ed Yourdon via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/7umThC

To catch a thief, you have to think like one. To prevent a crime, you have to case a joint like a potential infiltrator and find the weak spots. Today, an architecture and design critic gives us a burglars eye view of the built environment

Plus, humans respond to architecture on measurable cognitive and physiological levels - which means boring cities take a steep toll on our bodies and our minds.

Jim Cole/AP

The 32-year-old Manchester man charged with shooting two police officers Friday on the city's west side pleaded not guilty Monday to two counts of attempted capital murder. 

Defendant Ian MacPherson is being held without bail at the Valley Street Jail in Manchester.

Wikimedia Commons

Exeter Police have charged a former employee of Phillips Exeter Academy with two counts of sexual assault.

Authorities say Arthur Peekel turned himself into authorities today.

The man who appears on video being punched by law enforcement officers following a high speed car chase has been taken to Elliot Hospital. 

Richard Simone’s public defender requested a bail hearing on Friday after finding his client had not been transported to a hospital the day before. 

Attorney Tony Sculimbrene says it was expected he would be taken to a hospital following a court appearance on Thursday.

“The result of the bail hearing was that a transport order was issued to have him taken to a hospital,” Sculimbrene says.

Updated at 4:25 PM:

Manchester police have arrested 32 year-old Ian MacPherson on two counts of attempted capital murder following Friday morning's shooting of two police officers.

At a press conference, law enforcement officials identified the two injured officers as 27 year-old Ryan Hardy and 28 year-old Matthew O'Connor.

Associated Press

A murderer seeking to have his prison sentence reduced to the 10 years he has already served has had his request denied by a New Hampshire judge.

Eric Windhurst was 17 when he fatally shot a friend's stepfather, Danny Paquette, in 1985 after the friend told him Paquette had sexually abused her.

The killing went unsolved for two decades until Paquette's stepdaughter, Melanie Cooper, provided information leading to Windhurst's arrest in 2005.

Windhurst is from Hopkinton. He pleaded guilty to murder in 2006 and was sentenced to 15 to 36 years in prison.

Sam Evans-Brown for NHPR

The fire chief in Stoddard, New Hampshire, says he's implementing a plan to prevent future employees from committing arson after the recent arrest of a volunteer firefighter.

Chief Stephen McGerty said Wednesday that David Plante has been suspended from the Stoddard Fire and Rescue Department. Plante, who is charged with two counts of arson, is accused of setting two fires that burned hundreds of acres, forced the evacuation of 17 homes and caused $500,000 worth of damage to utility equipment.

A 26-year-old Portsmouth woman was sentenced to serve between eight and 20 years in prison for selling the fatal dose of drugs that caused a Maine man to overdose in 2015.

NH1.com reports Amanda Burgess was sentenced Tuesday after reaching an agreement with prosecutors to plead guilty to charges of supplying fentanyl with death resulting.

Prosecutors say Burgess sold a $40 dose of the synthetic opiate to 27-year-old Joseph Cahill, who was found dead on June 15, 2015. Burgess, a known heroin dealer, fled New Hampshire after the York, Maine man died.

JonJon2k8 via Flickr Creative Commons

  Police in Hanover say a phone scammer is impersonating an officer in an attempt to elicit cash payments. 

Wikimedia Commons

Officials at Phillips Exeter Academy have acknowledged two cases of sexual misconduct by a celebrated former faculty member.

In a letter sent to alumni earlier this week, Phillips Exeter Principal Lisa MacFarlane said Richard Schubart, who taught history, has admitted to both cases of misconduct which occurred in the 70s and 80s.

AP/Jim Cole

 A New Hampshire judge has ruled that the gun used to kill Pamela Smart's husband, Gregg, in 1990 will be returned to its owner.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Rockingham Superior Court Judge Andrew Schulman ruled this month that Vance Lattime Sr. is entitled to have his Charter Arms .38-caliber revolver returned.

Prosecutors say the gun was stolen by Vance "J.R." Lattime Jr. so Winnacunnet High School classmate Billy Flynn could murder Gregg Smart in the couple's Derry home.

The Caped Crusade, Dark Heart, & Alexander Chee

Mar 25, 2016
nur_h via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/6c3Msd

Today, from TV's campy crusader to the Dark Knight, Batman has been reflected American anxieties and social norms for almost 80 years. We'll explore his appeal as a mere mortal among superhumans, making him a magnet for our heroic dreams. 

Then, the phrase, "if it bleeds, it leads" has long been a critique of journalism, but a new book of pulp-fiction style stories by New England reporters plays up the lurid, sensational, side of following crime. Today, we'll talk to two of the veteran reporters behind Murder Ink.

Plus, a pair of true crime writers comb through the dark fantasies exposed at the trial of Seth Mazzalia.

Tamás Mészáros via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/eimCUu

The phrase, "if it bleeds, it leads" has long been a critique of journalism, but a new book of pulp-fiction style stories by New England reporters plays up the lurid, sensational, side of following crime. Today, we'll talk to two of the veteran reporters behind Murder Ink.

Also today, a look back at the roots of film noir, and a pair of true crime writers comb through the dark fantasies exposed at the trial of Seth Mazzalia.

Golden View Health Care Center via Google Photos

The New Hampshire attorney general's office says a female nursing home resident who died had been attacked by a male resident suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

Attorney General Joseph Foster said 82-year-old Barbara Whittier died on March 16, after authorities responded to the Golden View Health Care Center in Meredith.

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Federal authorities on Thursday arrested a Rochester man for his role in a standoff by Nevada ranchers opposed to federal control of public lands.

Jerry Delemus, a New Hampshire Tea Party activist and co-chair of New Hampshire Veterans for Donald Trump, remains in federal custody after being charged with conspiracy, obstruction, assault and making threats during the 2014 armed standoff involving Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy. 

3.01.16: The Art of Moderating & the Confidence Game

Mar 1, 2016
Peter Roberts via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/7MUrSR

Last week's debate among republican presidential candidates was so raucous that at one point, the closed captions couldn't keep up and simply read "unintelligible yelling". Today, a seasoned debate moderator sheds light on the tough task of keeping onstage arguments civil, and what makes for a great debate.

Then, are human beings wired to be swindled? Later in the show we'll explore the psychology of con artists and why it's so easy to fall for them.

Via policearchives.org

A former deputy sheriff in New Hampshire is facing new charges of sexual assaults on inmates he was transporting.

WMUR-TV reports that former Belknap County deputy Ernest Justin Blanchette was indicted Thursday on multiple counts of sexual assault involving inmates.

Authorities told WMUR that Blanchette committed the acts on five different inmates while transporting them between correctional facilities across the state. He is charged with nine counts of aggravated felonious sexual assault and one count of felonious sexual assault.

A Seabrook woman has been sentenced to three years probation and six months of home confinement after pleading guilty to Social Security fraud. 

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

A Manchester man has pleaded guilty to voter fraud.

Tony Webster via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/4NPfdS

You might be surprised to learn that America’s murder rate has been steadily declining for more than two decades. Despite the drop, the number of murder cases being solved has remained flat.

On today’s show, technology, trust, and why cops aren't solving more murders. Plus, a grieving mother turns to art to remember her daughter, and other victims of New Hampshire’s heroin epidemic.

Andy L via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/deqA7J

The life of a 'repo man' is always intense; just imagine the stakes on the high seas. On today’s show, we’ll dive into the murky world of maritime "repo men", hired to recover ships stolen and scrubbed to hide their identity by gun runners, human traffickers, and pirates.

Then, for nearly 50 million U.S. workers, drug tests are a condition of employment. We'll look into the costs and efficacy of random drug testing. 

File photo

New Hampshire's highest court says it will hear the appeal of a man convicted of killing an 18-year-old woman more than four decades ago.

Robert Breest has denied beating Susan Randall to death and tossing her partially nude body onto the frozen Merrimack River in Concord in February 1971. Now 77, Breest has twice been denied parole because he refuses to admit to the crime and take part in sex offender treatment. Instead, he has tried to clear his name through DNA testing.

The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office released new information Tuesday about four unidentified people found dead in 1985 and 2000 in Bear Brook State Park in Allenstown.

Senior Assistant Attorney General Benjamin Agati announced the release of new composite images of the four victims that officials hope will make it easier to identify them. Agati also released new information about where the victims -- one adult woman and three children -- likely lived. 

JonJon2k8 via Flickr Creative Commons

Police in Portsmouth are reminding residents about the dangers of a number of telephone scams. 

Dreamstime via Flickr CC

For the first time in decades, court-appointed lawyers who represent the poorest  clients will get a raise.

The raise from $60 to $100 dollars an hour would apply only to major crimes that take hundreds of attorney hours, like capital murder, and felonious sexual assault. The maximum fee cap for those crimes will also increase from $4,100 to $8,000.

valiantness via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/fRNWA6

This week, a federal judge sentenced peanut executive Stewart Parnell to 28 years in prison for his role in a deadly outbreak of salmonella…the first ever felony conviction for a food safety crime.  Today, we speak with the investigative reporter behind “Food Crimes” – a new video series examining everything from food borne illness, to the illegal saffron trade. Plus, a baffling new literary trend – why millions of Evangelical readers are snatching up Amish romance books.  

Nathan Rupert via flickr CC / flic.kr/p/aEtJLV

As schools across the country struggle to meet the new national common core standards, one controversial aspect of education is not part of the curriculum: sex education. On today’s show: the evolving debate around sex ed, and why it’s not strictly an American phenomenon. Plus, from false confessions to inadequate defenses, wrongful convictions can happen for many reasons. We’ll look at faulty eyewitness testimonies, the number one contributing cause of wrongful convictions.

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