Crime

The Exchange
9:00 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Do Sex Offender Laws Keep Us Safe?

photo: NCReedplayer Flickr CC

The city of Franklin wants to bar sex offenders from living near schools, but a judge ruled such restrictions violate equal protection laws. Franklin plans to appeal.  It’s just one example of how difficult this balancing act can be -- protecting the public while observing the rights of offenders. We’ll examine how this debate is unfolding in the Granite State.

Guests:

Tom Reid: Deputy County Attorney for Rockingham County.

Chris Dornin: Founder of Citizens for Criminal Justice Reform.

We'll also hear from...

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Around the Nation
8:52 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Alleged $30M Theft By Comptroller Stuns Ill. City

This November 2011 photo provided by The American Quarter Horse Journal shows Rita Crundwell of Dixon, Ill., at the 2011 American Quarter Horse Association World Championship Show in Oklahoma City. FBI agents arrested Crundwell, the Dixon comptroller, on charges she misappropriated more than $30 million since 2006 to finance a lavish lifestyle.
AP

The top financial official for the small city of Dixon, Ill., is accused of stealing more than $30 million from city coffers over the past six years. It's a staggering amount of money for the city of just 15,000 residents in northwest Illinois, and federal prosecutors allege she used the funds to finance a lavish lifestyle that included horse farms and a $2 million luxury motor home.

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The Two-Way
2:25 pm
Mon April 16, 2012

Math + Physics + Fancy Language + Sneeze = Beating Traffic Ticket

It was science, and a sneeze, that helped Dmitri Krioukov persuade a judge that he had obeyed the sign.
Mark Memmott NPR

Stories about someone beating a traffic ticket by using an imaginative defense always seem to strike a chord.

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Law
3:20 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Clemens Faces Trial (Again) Over Doping Testimony

Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens stops to sign a baseball as he leaves the federal courthouse in Washington, D.C., on July 14, 2011, after a judge declared a mistrial in his perjury trial.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 9:06 am

Baseball star Roger Clemens goes on trial for a second time Monday on charges that he lied to a congressional committee about using steroids and human growth hormone. His trial on perjury and obstruction charges last summer ended abruptly when prosecutors mistakenly showed the jury evidence that the judge had ruled inadmissible.

Clemens won a record seven Cy Young awards during his storied pitching career, but prosecutors contend that he used steroids and human growth hormone to prolong that career.

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Greenland Shootings
6:11 pm
Fri April 13, 2012

Details Slowly Emerging In Greenland Shootings

Cullen Mutrie
Police mug shot

  The shootings in Greenland remain under investigation. Law enforcement say the shooter that killed Chief Michael Maloney and wounded four others was 29 year old Cullen Mutrie – who was found dead at the scene along with an unidentified woman.

Maria Cramer covers crime for the Boston Globe. She talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson by phone from Hampton, where she’s been looking into Cullen Mutrie’s past.

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StoryCorps
3:06 am
Fri April 13, 2012

Colleagues Recall L.A. Riots Unfolding Like 'A Movie'

A store burns during the Los Angeles riots in April 1992. Three colleagues at a local radio station watched the riots from their studio on Crenshaw Boulevard, as listeners called in to share their own stories.
Douglas C. Pizac AP

Originally published on Fri April 13, 2012 7:22 am

It's been 20 years since the Los Angeles riots shook that city — and the nation. On April 29, 1992, several white Los Angeles police officers were acquitted in the beating of black motorist Rodney King during a traffic stop.

News of the acquittals sparked unrest across the city. The fires, looting and violence lasted for several days and devastated neighborhoods — many in the city's African-American communities.

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The Record
12:01 am
Fri April 13, 2012

Hearing In Megaupload Case To Determine Fate Of Users' Data

Megaupload boss Kim Dotcom in February as he is granted bail in a New Zealand court. Dotcom is in New Zealand waiting on a U.S. bid to extradite him on online piracy charges.
Michael Bradley AFP/Getty Images

On Friday morning a hearing scheduled in the criminal copyright case of Megaupload may have implications for all kinds of companies that sell storage space in the cloud — storage space used for anything from music files to family photos, research data to movie collections. The hearing will focus on what happens when the federal government blocks access to allegedly illegal files along with clearly legal ones.

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NH News
8:48 pm
Thu April 12, 2012

Official: 1 officer killed, 4 injured in Greenland shooting

New Hampshire Attorney General Michael Delaney addresses the media on the shooting that injured four police officers and killed Greenland Police Chief Michael Maloney.
Roger Wood NHPR

GREENLAND, N.H — Attorney General Michael Delaney says 48-year-old Greenland Police Chief Michael Maloney was the officer killed during a drug raid-turned-shootout that left four other officers wounded.  

Delaney confirmed early Friday that Maloney was the officer killed as authorities were conducting a drug investigation in the small town of Greenland.  

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Education
4:18 pm
Wed April 11, 2012

Spate Of Bomb Threats Annoys Pittsburgh Students

Students wait to pass through a security checkpoint at the University of Pittsburgh's Cathedral of Learning on Tuesday. Security has tightened at the school after a string of false bomb threats on the campus.
Larkin Page-Jacobs WESA

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 8:51 pm

Since mid-February, the University of Pittsburgh has received more than 50 bomb threats, and while they've all been false alarms, they have succeeded in disrupting campus life. Tighter security measures are now in place, but the threats continue, and students are wondering how they'll be able to make up class work and prepare for final exams.

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Remembrances
4:27 am
Wed April 11, 2012

Tulsa Shooting Victim Had Turned Her Life Around

Dannaer Fields, who went by Donna, is shown in this undated photo. She was one of three people killed in Friday's shootings in Tulsa, Okla.
Courtesy Of News On 6

In Tulsa, Okla., the families of the three victims killed during a shooting rampage Friday are planning funerals. Police say William Allen, 31, Bobby Clark, 54, and Donna Fields, 49, were shot in a predominantly black neighborhood on the north side of Tulsa by two white men.

Fields was walking home after playing a game of dominoes with friends. She was called Donna, but her given name was Dannaer. Her brother Kenneth says she was named after an aunt.

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Around the Nation
2:35 am
Mon April 9, 2012

'Premature' To Call Tulsa Shootings Hate Crimes

Alvin Watts (left), 33, and Jacob England, 19, were arrested following an appeal to the public to help police solve the five shootings that happened Friday. A police spokesman said the two face three counts of first-degree murder and two counts of shooting with intent to kill.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 10:15 am

Police in Tulsa, Okla., say it is much too early in their investigation to describe the murder of three black residents and the wounding of two others as a hate crime. Two men were arrested early Sunday morning and are expected to face charges of first-degree murder and shooting with intent to kill.

Soon after Friday's shooting, authorities reached out to the public for help. Police Maj. Walter Evans, the head of a task force looking into the murders, says information started pouring in shortly after that.

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Post Mortem: Death Investigation In America
5:00 am
Thu March 29, 2012

New Evidence In High-Profile Shaken Baby Case

Shirley Ree Smith sits in the living room of her daughter's upstairs duplex in Alexandria, Minn. Smith is waiting to hear if California Gov. Jerry Brown will grant her clemency. "They say things happen for a reason. I'm not sure if I'll ever figure out a reason for all of this," she says.
Courtney Perry for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 4:31 pm

A senior pathologist in the Los Angeles County coroner's office has sharply questioned the forensic evidence used to convict a 51-year-old woman of shaking her 7-week-old grandson to death, identifying a host of flaws in the case.

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Asia
3:36 pm
Tue March 27, 2012

Abuse Claims Follow Mafia Crackdown In Chinese City

Lawyer Li Zhuang spent more than a year in prison on charges of fabricating evidence and inciting witnesses, after trying to defend an alleged gangster. Li's case became a national cause celebre.
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Tue March 27, 2012 8:23 pm

The swift downfall of ambitious Chinese politician Bo Xilai exposed a bitter power struggle in the highest echelons of government. Now his victims are telling their stories, exposing a darker side to Bo's signature clampdown on organized crime.

Charismatic and outspoken, Bo seemed headed for the country's top leadership body, the Politburo Standing Committee, before he was removed abruptly from his post — as party secretary of the major southern city of Chongqing — earlier this month.

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Law
4:07 am
Wed March 21, 2012

Confronting The VP May Be Impolite. Is It A Crime?

Vice President Dick Cheney defends the Bush administration's policy on the war in Iraq in an address to the American Legion's annual conference in Washington, D.C., in 2006.
Leslie E. Kossoff AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a case involving the arrest of a Colorado man who was thrown in jail after telling Vice President Cheney in 2006 that the Bush administration's policies in Iraq were "disgusting."

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Law
4:04 am
Wed March 21, 2012

FBI Still Struggling With Supreme Court's GPS Ruling

FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies before a House Appropriations Committee panel on March 7.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 1:11 pm

Earlier this year, the Supreme Court said police had overstepped their legal authority by planting a GPS tracker on the car of a suspected drug dealer without getting a search warrant. It seemed like another instance in a long line of cases that test the balance between personal privacy and the needs of law enforcement.

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