croydon

Britta Greene / NHPR

Governor Chris Sonunu signed a controversial school funding bill, known as the Croydon bill, into law Thursday. 

Districts will now be allowed to use tax money to send students to private schools if there's no public option in the district. Religious schools, however, are excluded.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire House has passed a bill allowing districts without the option of public schools to use tax money to send students to qualifying private schools. Religious schools are excluded.

The measure, better known as the Croydon bill, passed 210 to 147. It now heads back to the Senate who are likely to concur. From there it's  to the Governor, who has said he’ll sign it.

The state senate passed a bill today that would allow school districts to use tax money to send students to qualifying private schools if there is no public school available in the district.

The so-called Croydon Bill was born out of a legal dispute between the Croydon school board and state officials.

Croydon, which does not have a public school for grades 5-12, began paying for a handful of students to attend a private Montessori School in nearby Newport.

A judge ruled that illegal and ordered Croydon to stop the payments.

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A bill going before a Senate committee Tuesday would allow towns to send students to non-religious private schools for grade levels not offered by the school district.

The bill seeks to clarify a legal dispute between the town of Croydon and the state Department of Education.

Croydon has no middle or high school, and has been paying for a handful of students to attend a private Montessori school.

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A judge has denied the state Department of Education's request to bar the Croydon School Board from using tax money to pay for some students' tuition at private schools.

Judge Brian Tucker ruled Monday that the request does not pass the test of looming "irreparable harm" needed for an immediate injunction. A hearing on the case is scheduled for Jan. 13, 2016.

 

The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office has asked a judge to bar the Croydon School Board from using tax money to pay for some students' tuition at private schools.

The complaint asks for preliminary and permanent injunctions against Croydon. Officials gave the board until Sept. 28 to stop using public funds— more than $32,000 —to pay for four students studying this year at the Newport Montessori School.

Croydon's one school goes up through the fourth grade. Parents then have school choice, with most choosing Newport public schools.

gofundme.com

School officials in Croydon have raised more than $20,000 through an online fundraising campaign, as the town prepares for a potential court battle with the state over school choice.

The crowdfunding page, "Support School Choice in Croydon, NH," was launched earlier this month by school board chairwoman Jody Underwood, and the largest donation – about $14,000 – came from an anonymous out-of-state donor.

The state attorney general’s office is expected to seek an injunction in Superior Court this week, after school officials in Croydon ignored an order to stop using public money for private school tuition.

The Valley News reports the Croydon School Board defied the state’s deadline of Monday to stop paying tuition for five students to attend the private Newport Montessori School.

The state attorney general’s office is ordering school officials in Croydon to stop using public money to pay for private school tuition.

The Croydon school district is paying tuition for roughly a half-dozen students to attend a local private school.

This has been presented as an option for parents since last September, after the district ended its agreement to send students fifth grade and up to schools in Newport.