Currier Museum of Art

Cori Princell/NHPR

For the past few months, visitors to the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester have had a chance to spend quality time with the artist Claude Monet.  Since July, the museum has had an exhibition, Monet: Pathways to Impressionism, showing works by the famous French painter. This is the final weekend to see it – it closes Monday.  

It’s just 4 paintings, in a small gallery with the walls painted deep red.  But together, the works tell a story about the artist.

Currier Museum of Art

Outside the Currier Museum this Saturday evening, you’ll find live music, chalk drawing, face painting, and something called an “art battle.” Five food trucks will line the streets, and when twilight sets in, a parade will start.

The museum is hosting an event called "Twilight at the Currier."

It's part of a new focus by the museum on community engagement. Karen Graham, the Currier's deputy director, says the museum has been looking for more ways to have people visit in a casual setting.

Virginia Prescott

The Currier Museum of Art’s website describes the current installation by Soo Sunny Park, titled BioLath, as: “an immersive sculptural environment that explores the effect of light on visual perception.”

On a recent visit to the Currier with some Manchester Elementary students, I witness the effect first hand: the kids are enthralled and immersed in the installation, and more comfortable than most adults when it comes to talking about contemporary sculpture.

Beyond the initial ooh-ing & ahh-ing effect of BioLath, a close look at the work reveals how meticulous and labor intensive its construction is.

Pien Huang

Dr. Alan Chong took over as the Director and CEO of the Currier Museum of Art last September. His job includes budgets, publicity, and fundraising. But what he’s really excited about is the art.

MWV Chamber of Commerce via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/DCd9Ju

Yellowstone may be the first national park, but it was New Hampshire's White Mountains that for decades prior captured the imagination of American tourists, scientists, and artists. Today, a portrait of Mount Washington's artistic history.

Plus, from Bob Dylan to Yoko Ono, audiences have long had a fascination with the off-beat or out of tune - so why do we love some bad singers and love to hate others?

Then, America's great repository of world knowledge faces an existential predicament. In a world where information is stored in servers and googled at will, can the Library of Congress really keep up?

2.1.16: Dead Presidents & Killer Heels

Feb 1, 2016
Brady Carlson / bradycarlson.com

After Iowans caucus tonight, the candidates will be back in New Hampshire, making a case for why they deserve to be president. The job's got plenty of perks, but it also means giving over your life, and your death. On today’s show, from mountainside monuments to commemorative sandwiches, we'll explore how America remembers its dead presidents.

Also today, high heeled shoes: mocked, coveted, and symbolic to feminists and fashionistas. We'll learn about the history of high heel shoes and why they haven’t always been a symbol of feminine status.

Susan Strickler, the director and CEO of the Currier Museum in Manchester since 1996, is retiring next June.

Under her guidance, the museum gained more than 33,000 square feet of space and added two large communal areas.

The museum has expanded its holdings of photography, prints and decorative arts, initiated a collection of craft and added major paintings and sculpture.

Courtesy of New Hampshire Audubon, Concord, New Hampshire.

In his groundbreaking work The Birds of North America, John James Audubon brought together the art world and the outdoors in a new way. It served as both a scientific record of North American bird species and a landmark in how to represent wildlife in art.

What’s less well known is the massive project Audubon took on after The Birds of North America.

The Impossible World of M.C. Escher

Sep 18, 2014
© 2014 The M.C. Escher Company- The Netherlands. All rights reserved. / mcescher.com

We spoke to the Currier Museum of Art's Senior Educator, Jane Oneail about the M.C. Escher retrospective that opens September 20th on the show today and in the process of prepping for that interview we discovered a few things about M.C. Escher that you might not know.

Getting together for dinner on a regular basis can be tough for any family, but it is especially hard for military families during deployments. On today’s show: how one mother of three dealt with her husband’s deployment, by asking guests to fill his empty seat once a week. Then, the artist M.C. Escher may be best known for his repeating patterns and mind-bending optical illusions, but a new exhibit at the Currier Museum of Art, touted as the most comprehensive retrospective of Escher’s work, is highlighting his lesser known illustrations.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

Robert Indiana, 1971 / Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, N.H.

When you think of the Pop Art movement, Andy Warhol's Campbell's Soup prints or Roy Lichtenstein's comic book paintings might come to mind.  But recently, one of their peers has been getting more attention than usual.  

Vincent van Gogh / Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, N.H.

It's not all about sports bars and Bowl parties; Hippo Editor Amy Diaz has a few suggestions for those who want a little art this weekend, including a new exhibit at The Currier, a trio of one act plays, and some opera