Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center

Valley News - Jennifer Hauck, Pool

Dartmouth-Hitchcock officials say they’re reviewing all safety procedures following the fatal shooting of a 70-year-old patient Tuesday.

Speaking outside the hospital's administrative offices Wednesday afternoon, Chief Clinical Officer Ed Merrens said a swift response from staff and law enforcement allowed for minimal patient disruption. “We had a full day yesterday. We had a busy OR, birthing pavilion, medical units -- everything was going,” he said. “Even in our surgical intensive care unit, we had patients taken care of.”

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

A former Dartmouth-Hitchcock doctor who had his license suspended earlier this year after faking medical records and diverting an opioid for his own use can now return to practice.

The New Hampshire Board of Medicine ruled earlier this month that Dr. Christopher Manfred can begin practicing medicine again pending certain conditions. Those include practicing only critical care medicine for the first year and agreeing to monitoring.

Governor Chris Sununu says more scrutiny of patient care at the state's mental hospital will only lead to positive outcomes.

britta Greene/NHPR

Merle Schotanus of Grantham has had cancer twice, prostate cancer in 2006 and lung cancer in 2014. With the second diagnosis, his doctors removed 20 percent of his right lung.

Of all of the things to worry about after that surgery, the Prouty was on his mind. “I was afraid I wasn’t going to be able to participate,” he said.

David Kessler via Flickr

During the last 15 years, the number of opioids sold in this country has quadrupled, contributing to an epidemic of addiction and overdose that has ravaged communities in New Hampshire and across the country. 

Courtesy of Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Joanne Conroy, a hospital executive in Burlington, Mass., will be the next CEO and president of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Conroy will take over the role in August after the departure of James Weinstein.  

Dartmouth-Hitchcock is the state's largest health system, with about 12,000 employees and 24 clinics in New Hampshire and Vermont. Conroy, an anesthesiologist, will be the first woman to lead the Lebanon-based system.

Governor Chris Sununu thinks the state and Dartmouth-Hitchcock have cleared the air over their dispute about mental health staffing at New Hampshire hospital.

That was Sununu's take after a meeting Wednesday with Dartmouth-Hitchcock CEO Jim Weinstein.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon

  Dartmouth-Hitchcock says it is discontinuing its Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility program at the end of this month due to staffing issues.

Dr. Edward Merrens, Dartmouth-Hitchcock's chief clinical officer, tells the Valley News the decision stemmed from difficulty in finding "the right amount of staffing" to support the work, which can involve monitoring patients seven days a week. He says because of the nature of the treatments, patients have to come in at specific times without delay.

Former N.H. Chief Justice Joins Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Mar 30, 2017
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A former Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Supreme Court has been hired to work for Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.

Former Chief Justice John Broderick will start next week as Senior Director for Public Affairs. Dartmouth-Hitchcock says Broderick will advocate on behalf of the hospital to policymakers and business and community leaders in the region. 

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Officials at Dartmouth-Hitchcock say a "freeze" on the health care system's pension plan for its more than 5,000 participating current and former employees is set to take place at the end of January.

The Valley News reports the freeze means that pension benefits will no longer increase for employees in the system's "defined benefit" retirement plan. Benefits that have already been accrued by retirees and current employees will not be affected.

Todd Bookman for NHPR

The term “apprentice” may conjure up thoughts of reality television and a certain President-elect, but actual apprenticeships--where workers learn skills on the job--are on the rise nationally. And in New Hampshire's health care industry, apprentices are being used as a way to fill a gap in the workforce.

NHPR

The CEO of Dartmouth-Hitchcock says he will step down when his contract expires next June.

A spine surgeon by training, James Weinstein has led the state’s largest health care system since 2011. During that time, he’s had to navigate both local and national challenges, including the arrival of the Affordable Care Act.

Thomas Fearon

 

The New Hampshire Executive Council has decided to honor the state's $36.5 million contract with Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center to staff New Hampshire Hospital.

The decision comes on the heels of the medical provider's announcement of mass layoffs system-wide.

Despite the deal being already in place and set to begin in November, Councilor Chris Sununu says he wants the contract to be re-bid.

Thomas Fearon

The chief medical officer at New Hampshire Hospital is planning to step down at the beginning of 2017, New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers announced Monday afternoon.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is responding to a firestorm of criticism over its announcement to lay off between 270 and 460 employees by the end of this year.

The hospital broke the news just two days after accepting a $35.5 million contract from the state. Some say Dartmouth-Hitchcock should have disclosed the layoffs before accepting the contract. 

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Two Republican candidates for governor are calling on the state to tear up a recently-approved, $36.5 million contract with Dartmouth Hitchcock, following the hospital's announcement it will lay off hundreds of workers.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

Dartmouth-Hitchcock plans to lay off hundreds of employees after a poor financial performance last fiscal year.

In an email sent to Dartmouth-Hitchcock employees, CEO James Weinstein said the company needs to shave $100 million dollars in annual expenses to achieve financial stability. The company finished last fiscal year with a $12 million dollar deficit.

THOMAS FEARON

The Executive Council voted unanimously today to allow Dartmouth-Hitchcock Hospital to mange care at the state psychiatric hospital for the next three years.

THOMAS FEARON

The Executive Council is slated to vote Wednesday on a contract between the state hospital and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Hospital. The vote comes as an independent investigation gets underway about a former patient's suicide. 

THOMAS FEARON

  

The Executive Council has voted 5-0 to allow Dartmouth-Hitchcock to take over managing the state psychiatric hospital in Concord, June 30. But a core group of psychiatrist staff refuse to work with Dartmouth-Hitchcock. 

Allison Quantz for NHPR

A New Hampshire planning board has approved a proposal allowing Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center to build a solar array southeast of its campus parking lots.

The Valley News reports the Lebanon planning board's decision Monday includes conditions that the hospital receive state wetlands and terrain approval before construction begins on the 1.25-megawatt solar array.

The hospital must also plant 20 additional trees to provide shade to cars and improve parking lot appearances.

Thomas Fearon

An ongoing staffing skirmish at New Hampshire Hospital threatens to create a backlog in the state’s already fragile mental health system.

The conflict pits one of New Hampshire's most esteemed medical institutions – Dartmouth-Hitchcock Hospital – against one of the most specialized psychiatric teams.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon

Dartmouth-Hitchcock health care system has been discussing a potential affiliation deal with Elliot Health System, a smaller provider serving southern New Hampshire.

The Valley News reports D-H executive vice president Stephen LeBlanc confirmed that the discussions were underway, but he declined to say what form the affiliation might take. 

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

  Officials with Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine are set to begin notifying workers who will lose or change positions as part of a restructuring. 

Allison Quantz for NHPR

The holiday season is fast approaching, and coming along with it is the stress associated with making travel plans or preparing big meals for family gatherings. That stress could take a toll on your body as well as your mind. It could cause back pain, insomnia and stomach problems, just to name a few.

We know that rest is a good way to cut down some of these problems. But now a new study demonstrates that relaxation programs could reduce your medical bills as well. 

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

  

An eastern New Hampshire medical center has agreed to pay over $450,000 after an audit revealed one of its hospitals was improperly collecting from a federal health care insurance program.

The Valley News reports Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center agreed to pay the Medicare program after the audit estimated that one of its hospitals wrongly collected $1.4 million from the program in 2011 and 2012.

Adam McCune

From the time he was born until the age of three, Isak McCune of Goffstown was a healthy, smart, sweet little boy.

And then his mother says her little boy just changed. He started having tantrums. Really big ones.

"We called it being held hostage," says Robin McCune. "He would go on and on for hours. We couldn’t leave the house. And then when they finally got to the point where he was just exhausted, then he would come to me and be held. Most of them were four to six hours. They were long."

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon

Three New Hampshire hospitals will be penalized next year for potentially avoidable mistakes, such as patient infections and injuries.

The federal government claims Dartmouth-Hitchcock in Lebanon and Eliot Hospital and Catholic Medical Center in Manchester should have done more to protect people from a list of "hospital-acquired conditions" in 2013. Those conditions include falls, bed sores, and infections from catheters.

As a result, in the fiscal year starting next October, the feds will penalize those three hospitals one percent of their Medicare payments.

VGo/NHPR Staff

Football faces increasing criticism as mounting evidence shows the dangers of concussions, in particular undiagnosed concussions.

A new telehealth initiative at Dartmouth College aims to eliminate those undiagnosed concussions by bringing neurosurgeons to the sidelines--via robot.

On the sidelines of the Dartmouth/Penn football game, neurosurgeon Robert Singer watches carefully.

"A lot of these hits are shoulder hits. What we’re looking for are direct head to head kind of contact, that type of thing."

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is trying to prevent the spread of a skin condition known as crusted scabies. Also called Norwegian scabies, the disease is non-life threatening and easily treatable if caught in time.

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