Data Breach

Airman 1st Class Greg Nash

Technology is developing more quickly than the security to protect it, leaving the personal information of millions at risk. Your health records, schedule, shopping habits, and more are  vulnerable to potential hackers. As the "Internet of things" grows, and more companies collect information on their customers, called big data, how can you protect yourself?


www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/

  New Hampshire's health commissioner is offering an extra apology as his agency deals with a data breach that led to personal information of up to 15,000 people being posted online.

Authorities said last week that a former patient at the state psychiatric hospital accessed the confidential data last year using a computer in the hospital library and posted the information to social media last month.

Some of the 15,000 people have died, but the state is notifying their families because the information still could be used in identity theft.

Thomas Fearon

 

The state’s Department of Health and Human Services says personal information for as many as 15,000 clients has been breached.

 

Names, addresses, social security numbers and Medicaid ID numbers were stolen, with some information posted on social media sites.

 

The agency says a patient at the state-run psychiatric hospital in Concord accessed the information in October, 2015 through a computer in the facility’s library.

 

Via Glassdoor

The state attorney general says about 21,000 New Hampshire residents who are T-Mobile wireless customers may have had personal data exposed in the recent breach at the Experian credit reporting agency.

According to the attorney general's office, data was used by T-Mobile in credit checks of applicants for its services from Sept. 1, 2013 through Sept. 16, 2015.

It included names, addresses, birth dates, Social Security numbers and other identification.