Debt Crisis

New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte expressed frustration with the budget stalemate and debt ceiling crisis on “Face The Nation” Sunday morning.  Host Bob Schieffer began by asking her where she thinks negotiations are since House Republicans' failed bid to defund Obamacare.

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A week into a government shutdown, with a looming debt ceiling crisis, politicians remain rooted in their positions.  Many people wonder if we’ve become partisan to a fault, with both sides refusing to contemplate compromise. We’ll look at how we got here and whether we’ve run out of solutions.

GUESTS:

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As another debt ceiling deadline looms, on top of a government shutdown, we’ll look at what our nation’s defining document, particularly the fourteenth amendment, says about federal debt, as well as the roles of Congress and the President. 

GUESTS:

With Greece entering its fifth year of recession and dealing with harsh austerity measures imposed as part of a eurozone bailout deal to save it from default, its society is in upheaval. Opinion polls suggest the old political system is collapsing, and extremist parties are gaining popularity ahead of spring elections.

At a recent protest in Athens, a large bronze bell tolled as thousands of policemen in full uniform marched solemnly through the streets. They ominously waved their handcuffs at Parliament, shouting, "Take your bailout plan and get out of here."

At the Museum of the Olympic Games in Olympia, Greece, lush pine trees and olive groves are filled with chirping birds. The one guard at the site looks nervously at the few visitors.

There is still a sense of shock in Olympia following the theft last month at the museum, when armed robbers broke into the building and tied up the single guard on duty.

Archaeologist Kostantinos Antonopoulos says they ran off with 77 priceless objects, including votive figurines, chariots and horses.

"I have a little bar. A drinks bar," says Chadd Ritenbaugh. His bar is called El Catalonia. It's in the port of Marbella, on the Spanish coast.

"Just sun, sand, and sea," he says. "It's just kind of empty at the moment."

Ritenbaugh bought the bar in 2009. Since then, business has gone downhill. He tried, and failed, to sell.

"Nobody's out buying bars right now," he says. "Banks in Spain are not lending a cent — a euro cent."

Chad himself tried and failed to get a bank loan. "Absolutely nothing," he says.

Stock prices rebounded somewhat Wednesday, one day after their biggest sell-off of the year. What caused prices to plunge Tuesday was an all-too-familiar problem: the Greek debt crisis.

European officials have cobbled together a deal to keep Greece from defaulting, and investors all over the world who hold Greek bonds are weighing their options. They're worried about what could happen if they reject the deal.