Demographics

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We're talking with millennials from the state for an update on whether and why more young adults are leaving the New Hampshire than coming to it, and what it means for the economy.

  This program was originally broadcast on 3/10/16.

  

AP

Ronald Reagan clobbered Jimmy Carter in the 1980 New Hampshire presidential election. Four years later, he did the same to Walter Mondale. So resounding were those thumpings, Carter won just two towns in the state, Mondale five. 

Republican supremacy in the state did not start with Reagan, nor did it end with him. But Reagan’s two victories may represent the GOP high-water mark in New Hampshire presidential contests. The question now is: Has Republican support in the state bottomed out, or could it continue to fall in 2016? And what might Donald Trump, this year's unconventional GOP nominee, mean for this trend?

NHPR Staff

 

Lawmakers are receiving a series of briefings on New Hampshire's labor market, economy and demographic challenges.

Economists and other experts are making presentations Monday to House and Senate lawmakers who sit on key committees that determine how money is raised and spent in New Hampshire. The briefings are open to the public and will be live streamed on the state's website.

  New Hampshire’s foreign-born population continues to grow, though not as quickly as the national rate.

An analysis of census data from the Pew Charitable Trusts shows the percentage of foreign-born residents in New Hampshire has risen to 5.4 percent.

nhpolicy.org

The New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies writes a report of their annual survey of the major policy issues and critical questions shaping New Hampshire's future. The data explain where New Hampshire has been, forecast where it is heading, and explore how current trends and policy choices facing the state will affect the well-being of its citizens.

GUESTS:

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates New Hampshire’s population grew by only .1% last year. That’s fewer than 2000 people added since 2012. That’s among the slowest rates of growth in the nation.


Newly released data from the US Census Bureau says Americans are on the move again – the country’s rate of domestic migration in 2012 hit a five-year high.

The story of migration in northern New England, however, is slightly more complicated. According to the results of the latest American Community Survey, New Hampshire saw a rise in migration after several years of decline. But Massachusetts and Maine saw decline.

There’s a term in demographic studies, “natural decrease” – it’s when a county has fewer births than it has deaths, and it’s happening in parts of New Hampshire.

Credit jA-rg via Flickr Creative Commons

Recently, the Williams Institute published the largest single study investigating the U.S. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer population.