Demographics

nhpolicy.org

The New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies writes a report of their annual survey of the major policy issues and critical questions shaping New Hampshire's future. The data explain where New Hampshire has been, forecast where it is heading, and explore how current trends and policy choices facing the state will affect the well-being of its citizens.

GUESTS:

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates New Hampshire’s population grew by only .1% last year. That’s fewer than 2000 people added since 2012. That’s among the slowest rates of growth in the nation.


Newly released data from the US Census Bureau says Americans are on the move again – the country’s rate of domestic migration in 2012 hit a five-year high.

The story of migration in northern New England, however, is slightly more complicated. According to the results of the latest American Community Survey, New Hampshire saw a rise in migration after several years of decline. But Massachusetts and Maine saw decline.

There’s a term in demographic studies, “natural decrease” – it’s when a county has fewer births than it has deaths, and it’s happening in parts of New Hampshire.

Credit jA-rg via Flickr Creative Commons

Recently, the Williams Institute published the largest single study investigating the U.S. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer population.