DES

Jason Moon for NHPR

Last week, the Environmental Protection Agency said the Coakley Landfill, a superfund site in North Hampton, does not currently pose an unacceptable risk to human health.

That message came as a surprise to some members of a task force charged with investigating a cancer cluster on the Seacoast. They have been arguing for months that the EPA needs to be more proactive in addressing contamination at the site.

NHPR’s Seacoast Reporter Jason Moon recently sat down with All Things Considered host Sally Hirsh-Dickinson to talk more about this.

Texas A&M AgriLife

The Department of Environmental Services has been issuing more warnings than it usually does at this point in the summer for algal blooms, potentially toxic mats of cyanobacteria.

But David Neils, chief water pollution biologist at the department, says that uptick is partly caused by an increase in public awareness.

“People are becoming educated about cyanobacteria, so they’re looking for them more often, and call us more often.”

Some of those blooms that residents call DES about are small or nontoxic, but the department issues a warning just to be safe. 

Daniel Case, Wikimedia

New Hampshire is receiving more than $160,000 to keep waste water from boats out of the state’s lakes and shores.

The funding announcement was made Friday by the U.S. Department of the Interior, which is distributing $32 million nationwide through the Clean Vessel Act.

Under state law, boats aren’t allowed to discharge their holding tanks in any inland bodies of water, or within three miles of the New Hampshire seacoast.

www.puc.nh.gov

After pulling his first nominee for the position, Gov. Chris Sununu brought forward a new nomination to oversee the state’s environmental agency at Wednesday’s executive council meeting: Public Utilities Commissioner Robert Scott, of Bow.

File Photo

After more than a decade on the job, the head of New Hampshire’s Department of Environmental Services is ready to step down.

Gloconda Beekman / Flickr/CC

After the Flint, Michigan water crisis, many around the country started taking a closer look their own water systems. And with a recent contamination scare in southern New Hampshire by the chemical PFOA  - the concerns have become local.  We'll look at the state's sources for drinking water, and the challenges to delivering it free from contaminants.

Karen Cardoza via Flickr CC

As summer approaches, boaters who enjoy spending time on Lake Winnipesaukee have their eyes focused on two things: the weather and the lake level.

Most lakes have natural high and low seasonal water points caused by the whims of nature. But the state’s largest lakes are too important to New Hampshire’s tourism economy to be left to chance.

We sit down with New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services Commissioner Thomas Burack.  The state’s environment has seen some hopeful trends recently, particularly when it comes to air quality. The story changes, however, when it comes to our lakes and coastal waters. We’ll get an update on what’s been working in addressing these issues, and what still needs to be done.

Guest

  • Tom Burack - New Hampshire Commissioner for Environmental Services

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The Attorney General’s office has announced a settlement in what it calls the largest illegal wetlands fill in New Hampshire History. The company involved faces up to $1.3 million dollars in state and federal fines, restoration, and "supplemental environmental projects."

The Department of Environmental Services is working to have  a former auto-parts factory and landfill in Farmington declared a Superfund site. DES officials are confident the site will be accepted into the federal program.