Disability Rights Center

NHPR File Photo

 

A judge has scheduled a trial on a lawsuit filed by The Disabilities Rights Center against New Hampshire corrections officials to obtain records about the death of an inmate with mental illness.

The non-jury trial was scheduled by U.S. District Court Judge Landya McCafferty for March 2019.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 11, 2018

May 10, 2018

The state's new Child Advocate launches an investigation into the Sununu Youth Center following allegations of a pattern of illegal use of restraints on juveniles there.  For the third time this year, the New Hampshire House of Representatives votes against a bill to create education savings accounts. Voting laws and Medicaid expansion are on the governor's desk to be signed into law.  And it's that time of year - bears are out, looking for easy pickings at your bird-feeder...even in Manchester.

WATCH THE SHOW:

In a new report, the Disability Rights Center of New Hampshire says staff at the Sununu Youth Center used excessive force on a 14-year-old boy with emotional and behavioral disabilities in December of 2016. The DRC's investigation found probable cause to suspect the Sununu Center used, and continues to use, unlawful restraint.

All Things Considered host Peter Biello interviewed Andrew Milne, staff attorney for the DRC, to discuss the new report. (SCROLL to the bottom of this post to read the report as well as the response from DHHS.)

NHPR File Photo

Late last year, a 34-year-old man died alone in his cell at the state prison for men in Concord. He was in the prison's residential treatment unit, which houses inmates with a mental illness who are unable to function in the general inmate population. Now the Disability Rights Center New Hampshire has filed a lawsuit in federal court trying to get access to Phillip Borcuk's records and documents related to the investigation into his death. 

DRC staff attorney Andrew Milne joins Peter Biello to talk about the case. 

Garrett Vonk

Three years after the state reached a major legal settlement meant to reform its mental health system, both the outside reviewer hired to monitor the state’s progress and the advocacy organization that sued on patients’ behalf say there’s still significant work to be done.

Courtesy NH House of Representatives

New Hampshire is falling behind on several of the requirements from the landmark mental health settlement it reached in 2014, according to the latest report from an outside reviewer who’s evaluating the state’s progress.

Jamie Gemmiti / Conway Daily Sun

The state has long worked to support people with disabilities in the least restrictive ways as possible, preferably right at home. But a small group still end up in institutions. Now though, one of these facilities is getting a hard look after reports of abuse.  We’ll discuss this system overall and where more oversight might be needed.

GUESTS:

Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center, Effingham, NH.

A new state report documents systemic neglect and abuse at a residential facility for people with disabilities in Effingham.

Now the state will determine if the facility can keep its doors open. But the state may simply be ill-equipped to stop these kinds of problems before they happen.