Disaster relief

Britta Greene/NHPR

 

Bottled water, non-perishable food, can openers and cash will be accepted on the state capitol lawn for hurricane victims in Puerto Rico on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Governor Chris Sununu announced the effort Wednesday afternoon. "We're going to do our part, and I think every state needs to do their part," he said.

President Donald Trump has issued a major disaster declaration for New Hampshire and will provide federal emergency assistance following severe storms that hit the state last month.

The storms dropped more than an inch of rain per hour. About 60 roads were damaged, about a dozen homes were surrounded by water and about 600 people evacuated from campgrounds. Most of the damage was in Grafton County.

New Hampshire authorities say initial damage assessments from last weekend's storms and flooding are in excess of $11.5 million.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

The New Hampshire House voted Thursday to distribute $2 million dollars to dairy farmers hurt by last year’s drought.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Disasters in developing nations bring out the better angels of the world’s governments and citizens, but where that aid goes has a lot to do with media coverage. On today’s show, we discover why the world’s worst disasters don’t always get the most aid. Also today, a political scientist argues that fringe candidates have a shot at the presidency – if they can get the support of their party. And, if you think Chris Christie is the first presidential candidate whose weight could make or break him, think again.

DVIDSHUB via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/5oAZgp

Disasters in developing nations bring out the better angels of foreign governments and world citizens, but not all aid, or media coverage, is distributed equally. On today’s show we discover why the world’s worst disasters don’t always get the most aid.

Then, if you’ve ever binge-watched a show until you feel sick, you may be suffering from: “shoverdose”.  Check your phone obsessively? Well, you may be “figital”. Later in the show, the joys of made-up words.

The U.S. Small Business Administration says federal disaster loans are available to small businesses, agricultural cooperatives and nonprofit groups in New Hampshire as a result of extreme temperature fluctuations from Dec. 1, 2013 through April 30, 2014.

Under this declaration, the SBA's Economic Injury Disaster Loan program is available to eligible farm-related and nonfarm-related groups that suffered financial losses throughout New Hampshire.

The loan amount can be up to $2 million.