Diversity

Britta Greene / NHPR

Over the next several months, the Claremont schools will take a closer look at issues of discrimination and bullying in the district. This comes after an alleged racially motivated attack of a young boy in town by local teenagers.

Oyster River School District

The Oyster River School District is grappling with a racially charged incident that took place on a school bus earlier this month.

Superintendent Jim Morse says he was taken aback by the revelation that an elementary school student from a biracial family had been bullied with racist language by another student on the bus.

He says the episode was out of character for the district which includes the towns of Durham, Madbury, and Lee.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Robert Azzi is an Arab-American Muslim who wants you to ask him anything about his faith. The Exeter-based photojournalist has put together a program called “Ask a Muslim Anything” that he hopes will help reduce misunderstandings between people of different faiths. 

Scripps National Spelling Bee via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/nMQtsf

Since 2007, every single winner of the Scripps’ National Spelling Bee has been Indian-American – a fact that fuels stereotypes about so-called “model minority” students. 

On today’s show: the perils of labeling.  Then, we turn to a different kind of label: electrohypersensitivity. We’ll take a look at a growing group of individuals who claim to be suffering from the condition, and why they’ve moved to the national radio quiet zone. 

NHPR / Ryan Lessard

Manchester is the state’s largest city, and it’s also the most racially diverse.

In the wake of tensions between police and citizens in several large cities, the Manchester Police Department recently held a public forum to talk about policing in a diverse community.

David Mara is chief of the Manchester Police Department.

He joins Morning Edition to talk about the issue.

When you first talked about the idea behind the forum, you said you didn’t want to have a Ferguson in 10 years. What did you mean by that?

Best of 2014 - How We Talk About Race In N.H.

Dec 30, 2014
Sean Hurley / NHPR

This spring, after racist remarks by Los Angeles Clippers Owner Donald Sterling and Wolfeboro Police Commissioner Robert Copeland, outrage dominated national headlines. Now, after events in Ferguson and New York City, race relations seem more fraught than ever, but a call for a more honest conversation about race still resonates.

This program originally aired on June 5, 2014.

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