Donald Trump

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  Friday is inauguration day, as Donald Trump is set to take the oath of office and be sworn in as the nation’s 45th president.

NHPR’s Morning Edition spoke to two Granite Staters from opposing sides of the political spectrum about what they’re hoping to hear from Trump in his address, and their expectations from him as president.

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Following the New Hampshire Presidential Primaries last February, NHPR’s Sean Hurley went to visit the bellwether town of Shelburne, where the voting numbers almost exactly matched those of the State as a whole.

With the inauguration upon us, Sean wanted to find out what the people of Shelburne were saying about our incoming president. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  U.S Senator Jeanne Shaheen questioned Donald Trump’s pick for defense secretary about NATO during confirmation hearings today.

As a candidate, President–Elect Trump questioned the utility of NATO, but in picking General James Mattis to lead the military, Trump selected a former NATO commander.

Shaheen asked Mattis about Trump’s NATO comments and about a a slated boost in U.S. funding for NATO under an initiative known as ERI.

“Will you support the ERI continuing as secretary of defense?

Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she is still undecided over a confirmation vote for Rex Tillerson, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for Secretary of State.

Shaheen, a second-term Democrat, met earlier this week with the former ExxonMobil CEO, calling her conversation with Tillerson broad. Speaking in Rochester Friday, the Democrat again raised concerns about Tillerson’s business dealings with Russia.

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New Hampshire’s members of the Electoral College are requesting an intelligence briefing on Russia’s alleged involvement in the U.S. presidential election.

In a letter to James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence, the electors say they should be provided more details on the scope of investigations into Russian government interference in support of Donald Trump before their scheduled vote on December 19th.  

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Every Sunday an ad hoc group of friends and acquaintances meets to play a game of pick-up soccer… the teams are fluid, and there's no referee, but they play a spirited game, with players shouting in both Spanish and English…

Alfredo is decked out in neon yellow socks and cleats, and his hair pulled back in a small bun…he plays a mean game, fast footwork. To protect his privacy … we’re only using his first name.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire polling places were under plenty of scrutiny on Election Day.

The attorney general’s office dispatched 50 people to polling locations across the state to keep an eye out for problems. The U.S. Department of Justice had its own Election Day hotline set up to field questions and potential complaints. Officials in the Secretary of State’s office, meanwhile, also kept an eye out for issues.

And, despite what President-Elect Donald Trump tweeted Sunday night, nowhere is there any evidence that large groups of people were voting illegally in New Hampshire.

SAUL LOEB / AP

President-elect Donald Trump is alleging there was quote-serious voter fraud in New Hampshire and other states during the election earlier this month, despite no evidence to back up such a claim.

Trump narrowly lost New Hampshire to Hillary Clinton, though won the election despite losing the overall popular vote.

In a series of tweets Sunday, Trump claimed he would have won the popular vote had it not been for the quote-millions of people who voted illegally.

Trump also claimed there was serious voter fraud in New Hampshire, Virginia, and California.

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Amid uncertainty about the future of the country’s immigration laws under a Trump administration, Dartmouth is trying to reassure undocumented students that they’re welcome on campus — and that the school will try to protect them from potential changes in the law that might be in store.

New England Readies For Trump’s Refugee Plans

Nov 23, 2016
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

President-elect Donald Trump hasn’t elaborated much on immigration policy, beyond what he laid out during the campaign.  But enough has been said that many believe he will limit the number of refugees allowed into the U.S.

Before the election, at numerous campaign events, then candidate Donald Trump made it clear he would not be putting out the welcome mat for refugees from Syria, who now number in the millions.

Note: This story was reported as part of the New England News Collaborative.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Former Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown, one of President-elect Donald Trump's most prominent local backers, is in the running to join Trump's cabinet as secretary for veterans affairs.

As Scott Brown left Trump Tower he told reporters his meeting with the President-elect was "great," and that he expects to hear if Trump has selected him to lead the VA after Thanksgiving.

At the end of October, Donald Trump spoke in Gettysburg, Pa., and released a plan for his first 100 days in office.

Updated at 7:30 a.m. ET on Nov. 10

Protesters took to the streets in cities across the United States, angered by the surprise election of Donald Trump. Demonstrations began shortly after President-elect Trump claimed victory in the early hours of Wednesday. On Wednesday night and into Thursday morning, they spread to several major cities.

Michael Brindley

The presidential campaign is usually an opportunity every four years for students to study democracy in real time. But, by all accounts, this campaign has been anything but normal.

The adult themes and harsh rhetoric have been especially challenging for educators, who’ve had to figure out how to address these subjects in the classroom.

NHPR Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spoke with educators across New Hampshire to see what’s different about teaching the presidential campaign this year.

Valentina Tabatchikova for NHPR

Ivanka Trump campaigned across Southern New Hampshire Thursday for her father with stops in Manchester, Hollis and Nashua. 

Jason Moon for NHPR

With just days remaining before voters head to the polls, both presidential campaigns are sprinting to the finish line in New Hampshire. And, perhaps not surprisingly, each camp feels it has the winning strategy to get out the vote. But what does that look like on the ground?

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Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka will stump for her father in New Hampshire Thursday.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire will be at the center of presidential politics on the last day before the election.

Republican nominee Donald Trump and President Barack Obama both plan to campaign in the state on Monday. Obama will campaign on behalf of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. Election Day is Nov. 8.

New Hampshire holds four Electoral College votes. Clinton is ahead according to public polling, but Trump appears to be closing the gap in the final days. Winning New Hampshire is critical to his hopes of winning the White House.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

In a campaign stop in Rochester New Hampshire on Sunday, Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence praised the FBI's decision to review emails that may be related to Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server. 

Jason Moon for NHPR

Donald Trump’s rally at the Radisson in Manchester was scheduled to begin at noon. But the fact that he was running more than hour and a half late may have actually worked in his campaign’s favor.

“I need to open with a very critical breaking news announcement…”

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Donald Trump is returning to New Hampshire, his third trip to the Granite State this month.

The Republican presidential nominee will hold a rally in Manchester on Friday, the campaign has announced.

With less than two weeks to go, both Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton are targeting New Hampshire, one of the key swing states that could decide the race.

Clinton held a rally earlier this week at Saint Anselm College.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Eric Trump, son of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, was in New Hampshire Tuesday to help rally supporters in the final stretch before Election Day.

Complaints about skewed public polls are nothing new. Recent election cycles have included many such accusations from candidates – especially when they’re running behind. In 2012, many Republicans held onto the idea that the polls were skewed against Mitt Romney, right up until Barack Obama won reelection.

Associated Press

Donald Trump's son Eric Trump will be in New Hampshire Tuesday to support his father's presidential campaign.

Eric Trump will make stops at Trump campaign offices in Manchester, Nashua, Salem and Stratham, where he'll meet with supporters and volunteers.

The son of the Republican presidential nominee will end the day at the Seacoast Republicans Rally in Seabrook.

With two weeks left in the campaign, both parties are spending plenty of time in New Hampshire, seen as a key swing state in the presidential race.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Vice Presidential nominee Mike Pence made a stop in Exeter last night, looking to drum up support for Republican Donald Trump’s struggling New Hampshire campaign.

 

The Indiana Governor told the crowd the choice to be made on November 8th is about the nation’s security, and future prosperity. He cautioned that the balance of the Supreme Court hangs on their vote, and he defended Donald Trump for remarks made during last week’s debate about the validity of American elections.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out.

He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon.

He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate tonight at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors. 

SAUL LOEB / AP

  Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton take the stage Wednesday night in Las Vegas for the third and final presidential debate.

Republican National Committeewoman Juliana Bergeron of Keene joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the debate and what she’s hoping to hear from Trump.

Let's make one thing clear: Three weeks out from this election, Hillary Clinton is winning — and it's not close.

Yes, people still have to vote, but if Democratic groups come out — and the Trump scorched-earth campaign is more like a white flag than an actual strategy — Hillary Clinton will be the next president of the United States unless something drastic changes between now and Election Day.

The month of October has been about as bad as could be for Trump. Let's recap. There was:

- The leaked audio of Trump's comments bragging about kissing and groping women,

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