Donald Trump

Allegra Boverman

We sit down with Mary Louise Kelly, NPR's national security correspondent, a beat that has her covering the CIA, the FBI and other intelligence agencies.  We'll look at the year she's experienced following those stories - including this week's Capitol Hill hearings about Russian interference in the presidential election.   Kelly is in New Hampshire this week for the Justice and Journalism series -- a collaboration between NHPR and the Warren B. Rudman Center at UNH Law School. 


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New Hampshire political operative Corey Lewandowski was an early campaign manager for President Trump. He was officially let go from the Trump campaign last June, but he's kept in close contact with the President. An article in Politico looks at a firm he's co-founded in Washington, D.C. called Washington East West Political Strategies

On Saturday, people will march through downtown Concord, part of a nationwide demonstration called March for Science.

Organizers say the marches are nonpartisan, but many taking part cite concerns over the Trump administration’s uncertain position toward climate science, as well as proposed budget cuts.

It’s raising questions about whether scientists should get involved in what could be perceived as a political event.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

New Hampshire’s United States Senators are criticizing proposed cuts to a federally funded grant program.

Both Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan spoke in Concord Wednesday about the importance of the Community Development Finance Authority. As former governors, the Democrats say they saw first-hand the results of the CDFA’s grant program, which funds projects including substance abuse treatment facilities, soup kitchens and municipal infrastructure.

  President Donald Trump is set to hit the 100-day mark later this month.

It’s often seen as an early milestone when a presidency can be judged in terms of its accomplishments.

Tom Rath is a longtime Republican strategist in New Hampshire and a former state attorney general.

He’s speaking Wednesday about Trump’s first 100 days at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The factory floor inside of Graphicast, a manufacturing company in Jaffrey, feels like a throwback to another era. Workers stand around waist-high crucibles, plucking casts out of the pots filled with bubbling liquid metal.

“We’re melting at about 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit,” says Val Zanchuck, the company’s CEO, over the din. 

Updated at 2:55 p.m. ET with additional reporting

The wonkiest soap opera in Washington served up yet more of its trademark plot twists on Tuesday as the House Intelligence Committee's investigation into Russia detoured even further into partisan bickering.

The upshot of the day's back-and-forth was this: Former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, a holdover from the previous administration whom President Trump fired on Jan. 31, is not barred by the White House from testifying in open hearings in Congress.

A Russian billionaire paid former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort millions of dollars to boost the interests of Russian President Vladimir Putin, the Associated Press reports. The new allegations arise months after Manafort resigned from the campaign amid concerns over his work for a pro-Russian political party in Ukraine.

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Among the proposed cuts in President Trump's budget plan is a home heating assistance program that provides help to nearly 28,000 low-income New Hampshire residents.

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U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen visited former Iraqi refugee Tamam Mohamad, at the Spice Center market in Manchester to call attention to her opposition to President Trump's new executive order banning U.S. from 6 Muslim-majority countries and freezing all refugee resettlement.

Mohmmad came from Iraq in the late-1990s with $20. He eventually became a citizen and returned to his home country for 3 years as U.S. military interpreter. He says Iraq may not be included in the President’s new executive order, but that doesn’t matter to him.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

President Trump has signed a revised executive order, once again barring travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program.

It's similar to the president's January order that was blocked by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. But this latest order leaves Iraq off the list of barred countries.

The White House cites more cooperation with the Iraqi government in vetting people who apply for U.S. visas. The latest order also specifically states that it does not apply to legal permanent U.S. residents or current visa holders.

Alex Proimos via Flickr CC

During his speech to Congress Tuesday night, President Donald Trump reiterated his criticism of the Affordable Care Act, calling the health care law a “disaster.”  

"Obamacare is collapsing, and we must act decisively to protect all Americans. Action is not a choice, it is a necessity," said Trump.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Democratic U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire joined NHPR's Morning Edition Wednesday for reaction  to President Donald Trump addressed to a joint session of Congress.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

While President Trump and some of his allies perpetuated the (unverified and unsubstantiated) idea that out-of-state voters are being sent across the border en masse to throw New Hampshire elections, we were wondering: What can we actually know about the people who are showing up to register for the first time on Election Day?

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Dartmouth College is joining other Ivy League schools in opposing President Trump’s immigration order.

The Hanover-based school, along with 16 other elite institutions, filed a legal brief in a New York federal court on Monday. The colleges and universities argue that the travel ban, which is currently on hold following a federal appeals court ruling, would harm their ability to attract and educate the world’s best scholars.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  A new poll from the University of New Hampshire shows Granite Staters are split in their opinion of President Donald Trump’s performance in office so far.

Less than a month into Donald Trump’s presidency, 48 percent of New Hampshire residents disapprove of the job he’s doing, while 43 percent say they approve of his performance.

Ryan Caron King / New England News Collaborative

New Hampshire’s refugee resettlement agencies are moving fast to bring at least six refugees to the state before February 17th. That’s after a Federal Judge on Friday blocked parts of a Trump Administration executive order, including a 120-day ban on refugee admissions, and an indefinite ban on all immigration from Syria.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

While President Trump's recent executive order on refugees and immigrants has caused much concern across New Hampshire, there are also plenty of folks in the state who are happy with the new president's first decisive actions. 

Omid Moghimi

President Donald Trump’s executive order barring people from seven majority-Muslim countries for 90 days has had ripple effects here in New Hampshire. Among those impacted is Omid Moghimi. He is an Iranian-American citizen and a medical resident at Dartmouth-Hitchcock. And he has been trying to bring his wife Dorsa Razi to the United States for a year and a half now.

He joins NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about their situation.

This transcript has been edited for clarity.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Former Republican U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte has been tapped by the White House to lead the effort of shepherding U.S. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch through Capitol Hill.

President Donald Trump named Gorsuch Tuesday night as his pick to fill the seat left vacant by Antonin Scalia, who died last year.

Episcopal Church of New Hampshire

Faith leaders in New Hampshire are speaking out against President Donald Trump's executive order that stops refugees from entering the country.

Christian, Muslim and Jewish leaders are looking to their faith to explain their opposition to the immigration and refugee ban.

The Immigration Order: Impact on the Granite State

Jan 30, 2017
Kitt Hodsden; Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire reaction to the Trump immigration order. We hear from an array of Granite State voices:  politicians who feel this will, in the end, make the state safer.  Immigrants and refugees worried about their families and their futures. Colleges who welcome foreign students.  And major employers from hi-tech to hospitals.

GUESTS:

Eric Draper/AP

  President Donald Trump has nominated Keene native and former Republican Congresswoman Heather Wilson to serve as Secretary of the Air Force.

Trump made the nomination Monday.

Wilson, a Keene High School graduate, is currently president of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology.

She represented New Mexico in Congress from 1998 through 2009.

If confirmed, Wilson would be the first Air Force Academy graduate to hold the post, according to a White House statement.

NHPR/Hannah McCarthy

While many Trump supporters made the pilgrimage to Washington D.C. for the inauguration, some chose to celebrate a little closer to home. Joe and Pat Hagen hosted a viewing party at their bed and breakfast in Chester, New Hampshire, where guests shared their hopes for the next four years and toasted to the new president. 

Pool/Getty Images

  Friday is inauguration day, as Donald Trump is set to take the oath of office and be sworn in as the nation’s 45th president.

NHPR’s Morning Edition spoke to two Granite Staters from opposing sides of the political spectrum about what they’re hoping to hear from Trump in his address, and their expectations from him as president.

Sean Hurley/NHPR

Following the New Hampshire Presidential Primaries last February, NHPR’s Sean Hurley went to visit the bellwether town of Shelburne, where the voting numbers almost exactly matched those of the State as a whole.

With the inauguration upon us, Sean wanted to find out what the people of Shelburne were saying about our incoming president. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  U.S Senator Jeanne Shaheen questioned Donald Trump’s pick for defense secretary about NATO during confirmation hearings today.

As a candidate, President–Elect Trump questioned the utility of NATO, but in picking General James Mattis to lead the military, Trump selected a former NATO commander.

Shaheen asked Mattis about Trump’s NATO comments and about a a slated boost in U.S. funding for NATO under an initiative known as ERI.

“Will you support the ERI continuing as secretary of defense?

Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she is still undecided over a confirmation vote for Rex Tillerson, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for Secretary of State.

Shaheen, a second-term Democrat, met earlier this week with the former ExxonMobil CEO, calling her conversation with Tillerson broad. Speaking in Rochester Friday, the Democrat again raised concerns about Tillerson’s business dealings with Russia.

Jonathan Taylor via Flickr CC

New Hampshire’s members of the Electoral College are requesting an intelligence briefing on Russia’s alleged involvement in the U.S. presidential election.

In a letter to James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence, the electors say they should be provided more details on the scope of investigations into Russian government interference in support of Donald Trump before their scheduled vote on December 19th.  

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Every Sunday an ad hoc group of friends and acquaintances meets to play a game of pick-up soccer… the teams are fluid, and there's no referee, but they play a spirited game, with players shouting in both Spanish and English…

Alfredo is decked out in neon yellow socks and cleats, and his hair pulled back in a small bun…he plays a mean game, fast footwork. To protect his privacy … we’re only using his first name.

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