Donald Trump

Donald Trump is warning that the election will be rigged. He has precisely zero evidence to back up that claim. But he has a remarkably receptive audience.

Around 30 percent of Americans have "little or no confidence" that votes will be counted accurately — and Trump's voters are far less confident about that than Clinton's.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The latest polls show Hillary Clinton leading Donald Trump by about four percentage points in New Hampshire — closer than in many other battleground states.  And for Trump supporters here in the state, a week of increasing allegations didn’t keep them away from a weekend rally in Portsmouth.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

After a week of repeatedly denouncing allegations of sexual assault, Donald Trump again did so at an outdoor rally in Portsmouth on Saturday.  

But he also tried to turn the focus to the state’s opioid epidemic. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump is back in New Hampshire for a rally in Portsmouth on Saturday afternoon.

This is the first time the Republican presidential nominee has been in the Granite State since a 2005 video surfaced showing him boasting of groping women. 

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

First Lady Michelle Obama hosted a rally for Hillary Clinton Thursday afternoon at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester.

But Obama's speech didn’t focus on Clinton but rather on Donald Trump’s treatment of women.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Hours after a 2005 recording of Donald Trump was made public last week, in which the Republican presidential nominee boasted in explicit terms about groping women, Republican gubernatorial candidate Chris Sununu issued a one-sentence statement:  “Mr. Trump’s comments are repugnant, unacceptable and offensive.”

But when it comes to supporting Trump as president, Sununu’s campaign says nothing has changed. He still plans to back Trump as the Republican party’s nominee.

2016 Presidential Race: Uncharted Territory

Oct 10, 2016
Josh Rogers NHPR

We take a moment, fewer than 30 days from the election, to evaluate the recent turn of events in the Presidential race.  An 11-year old video, in which Republican nominee Donald Trump talked crudely about groping women, prompts N.H.'s Senator Kelly Ayotte to join a growing wave of Republican lawmakers unwilling to vote for the Republican nominee, or even calling for him to step down. We review the second presidential debate featuring questions from undecided voters as well as the two moderators.  And we consider whether the Republican party can hang on to control in Congress, and how the GOP, seemingly in crisis, can rebound.


josh rogers/nhpr

Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte says 11-year old footage of Donald Trump talking crudely about groping women is “fundamentally different” than past statements by Trump, and that she'd  support Trump dropping out of the race. 

Ayotte's latest stance comes two days after the Washington Post reported on a videotape where Trump talks of groping women.

On Friday, Ayotte called Trump’s remarks "totally inappropriate and offensive."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Senator Kelly Ayotte has withdrawn her support for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. The move comes after the Washington Post reported on an 11-year old video showed Trump talking crudely about groping women.

Friday night, Ayotte called Trump's remarks in the video "totally inappropriate and offensive."

By late Saturday morning, Ayotte said in a statement that she’s “a mom and an American first and cannot support a candidate for President who brags about degrading and assaulting women.”

Editor's note: This post contains language that is crude and explicit and that many will find offensive.

Updated 11:15 p.m. ET with comments by Trump supporters

Just two days before Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are set to meet for their second presidential debate, more damaging audio of the GOP nominee using crude language about women and how he would hit on them has surfaced.

josh rogers/nhpr

 

Town hall political events are dear to New Hampshire but not to Donald Trump, who built his campaign on huge rallies. And there were early signs Thursday night that Trump’s event in Sandown never aspired to be a true town hall.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

This story has been updated with a response from the Trump campaign.

At his rally in Bedford last week, Donald Trump’s prescription for New Hampshire’s drug crisis — a wall at the southern border as a way to stop the flow of drugs into the country — earned plenty of cheers.

That proposal, and his assessment of the state’s drug issues more generally, went over less well with New Hampshire’s leading drug prevention advocacy organization, New Futures.

Getty Images

Donald Trump returns to New Hampshire Thursday night, his second visit to the Granite State in just eight days.

The Republican presidential nominee will hold what’s being billed as a “town hall style event” in Sandown.

The event is invitation only, and is seen as preparation for Trump to get accustomed to the format for the second presidential debate Sunday in St. Louis.

That debate this weekend features a town hall style setting, with the candidates responding to questions from undecided voters.

 

Kelly Ayotte and Maggie Hassan shared a stage last night at New England College. Broadcast on NECN, it was the first televised debate in their race for US Senate. And it showed that despite this race’s high-profile – it’s one of a handful that could decide control of the Senate --  it remains in the shadow of the battle for the White House.

 

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Following their first debate Monday, Hillary Clinton has a 7-point lead over Donald Trump in New Hampshire according to a poll released Friday by WBUR.

The poll conducted Sept. 27-29 found 42 percent of likely voters supporting the Democratic presidential nominee, and 35 percent backing her Republican opponent. Thirteen percent of voters said they support Libertarian Gary Johnson.

The poll surveyed 502 likely voters and has a margin of error of 4.4 percentage points.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Donald Trump returned to New Hampshire Thursday for a rally in Bedford, where he took aim at Hillary and former President Bill Clinton.

NHPR

Back in January, former New Hampshire governor John H. Sununu warned voters against “drinking the Trump Kool-Aid.”

On Tuesday, Sununu poured himself a glass and took a big sip.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump squared off for their first presidential debate Monday night at Hofstra University in New York. Here in NH, the debate attracted crowds for watch parties for each candidate.

NHPR’s reporter Paige Sutherland stopped by a couple of them.

AP

Following their first debate Monday night, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump are bringing their presidential campaigns to the battleground state of New Hampshire.

Clinton will be in the state Wednesday, when she will campaign with former Democratic rival, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.

The two are set to appear together at an event at the University of New Hampshire, where they will discuss college affordability.

Trump is set to campaign here the following day, rallying with supporters at an event in Bedford on Thursday.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate Monday night. The NPR Politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is following along and will be annotating and fact-checking in real time.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Officials in the tiny town of Farmington say they're "grateful" that GOP presidential Donald Trump finally paid a bill for police overtime at a January rally.

The Concord Monitor reports that Trump's payment for the roughly $9,500 bill came after months of silence.

Farmington Town Administrator Arthur Cappello said that the Trump rally used up about 30 percent of the town's police overtime budget.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

After Tuesday’s primary election, both parties’ tickets for November are now officially in place. On Wednesday, the state’s GOP leaders gathered for a “unity breakfast” and got one major call to action: stand with the man who will be at the top of their lineup: Donald Trump. Their first chance was last night, at a rally Trump held in Laconia.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

At a campaign rally inside Laconia Middle School Thursday night, Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump opened his remarks by mocking the fact that his press pool’s plane was still on the tarmac:

"I have really good news for you. I just heard that the press is stuck on their airplane they can’t get here [Applause] I love it. So they’re trying to get here now they’re going to be about 30 minutes late they called and said, 'Could you wait?' I said absolutely not," Trump told a cheering crowd.

CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP

Donald Trump is back in New Hampshire Thursday.

The Republican presidential nominee is set to hold a campaign rally at Laconia Middle School at 7:30 p.m.

This comes as a report by Politico this week finds that Trump’s former campaign manager – New Hampshire resident Corey Lewandowski – has become increasingly more involved with the campaign behind the scenes.

Donald Trump and Tim Kaine are both headed back to New Hampshire on the same day, a sign of the increasing importance of this battleground state in the presidential election.

The Republican presidential nominee and the Democratic vice presidential candidate will both be in New Hampshire Thursday, but in different parts of the state.

Trump is set to hold a campaign rally at Laconia Middle School, according to his campaign schedule.

The rally kicks off at 7:30 p.m. 

President Obama repeated his argument that Donald Trump is not qualified to be president.

He urged both voters and journalists to pay careful attention to what he called Trump's "uninformed or outright wacky ideas," and not to grade the Republican White House nominee "on a curve."

"Somehow behavior that in normal times we would consider completely unacceptable and outrageous becomes normalized" during an election campaign, Obama said Thursday at the conclusion of a southeast Asian summit meeting in Laos.

At a candidate forum Wednesday night, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump explained their policies on ground troops, fighting ISIS and other issues related to the military. We've recapped five key moments here and more deeply examined two claims, one from each candidate, below.

A forum designed to test the leading presidential candidates' capacity for military leadership Wednesday night displayed as much unpredictability as the rest of this election, as questions and answers veered off-topic and both candidates were put on the defensive several times.

Donald Trump will give a speech Wednesday outlining his immigration stance. Given the last week of news coverage, he could have some serious explaining to do.

An immigration policy centered around extreme positions — mass deportation of 11 million immigrants in the country illegally, plus building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border — initially helped Trump stand out in the massive Republican primary field.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The Radisson ballroom was not yet full, and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump would not arrive for almost an hour. Already, the crowd chanted, “lock her up.” Peter Vincello from Raymond was on his way in, with his 15 year-old son.

“He kinda talked me into it. I was actually supporting Cruz in the primary.” But now, Vincello said, “He says all the right things, second amendment, getting the economy back, law and order.”

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