Donald Trump

At every turn, this year's presidential campaign has proved conventional wisdom wrong. The aftermath of the Paris attacks might be another example.

As soon as the attacks were over, a chorus of (establishment) Republican voices predicted that the new focus on national security and terrorism would change the dynamic of the Republican race. This was the tipping point, they declared, that would finally usher out the outsiders leading the polls — Donald Trump and Ben Carson — in favor of more serious, experienced candidates.

WBUR Poll: Trump Maintains Lead In New Hampshire

Nov 18, 2015

Less than three months before New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary, Donald Trump continues to maintain his lead over over the rest of the Republican presidential field in the state, according to a new poll commissioned by NPR member station WBUR.

Political pundits are wondering if Donald Trump had a Howard Dean-like political meltdown moment last night, when, in a 95-minute speech in Iowa, the Republican presidential candidate cursed numerous times and asked “How stupid are the people of Iowa?” in reference to their support of Ben Carson.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

The 8 a.m. “Politics and Eggs” forum was somewhat more subdued than the booming campaign rallies Donald Trump has held in other parts of the state.

But the crowd gathered in at the Manchester Radisson Wednesday morning was — to borrow a favorite descriptor from the candidate himself — still pretty “huge.”

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Donald Trump has been at the front of the Republican presidential pack in New Hampshire since late July — at the moment, outpacing all other candidates in polling averages double digits.

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Wednesday was the first day for presidential candidates to file for the New Hampshire presidential primary. Seven candidates are now officially on the ballot -- including GOP businessman Donald Trump. 

Donald Trump has run his presidential campaign by his own rules, and he's blown past traditional candidates, playing by the old rules, in the process.

Jason Moon for NHPR

It was still dark out when hundreds of voters made their way to a country club in Atkinson to see Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump. But Trump wasted no time in energizing this early morning crowd by going on the offensive.

Trump’s first target was the media, which he accused of inflating the significance of recent polls that show Ben Carson leading the GOP field in Iowa.

In the seemingly never-ending saga between Donald Trump and Latinos, the business mogul-turned-presidential candidate has canceled plans to attend a Q&A session with the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. The meeting was originally scheduled for next Thursday, Oct. 8, at the Newseum in Washington D.C.

A statement from the USHCC said Trump's "decision to forfeit the Q&A session was motivated by the concern of being 'put on trial.' "

The USHCC said Trump was unwilling to abide by the terms of the event:

File photo by Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump was back in New Hampshire Wednesday for a rally at Keene High School.

Amazing, simple, easy, fair.

Those are just four of the words Donald Trump used on Monday to describe his new tax plan. It sounds like a standard GOP tax plan, with cuts and limits on deductions. But when you look closer, it takes those ideas much further than his GOP rivals do — to the extent that it could cost the federal government trillions of dollars.

So what is he proposing? Here's what you need to know about it:

What does it do?

Despite George Stephanopoulos' best effort to press Donald Trump on the Republican front-runner's true thoughts about President Obama's birth and religion, the answers came off more as political dodges than the famous straight talk for which the GOP front-runner is famous.

On ABC's This Week today, Stephanopoulos asked Trump: "You've raised these questions so often in the past, why can't you just say definitively yes or no?"

Emily Corwin for NHPR

Even people with tickets were being denied entrance at the Rochester Recreational Arena: the place was packed to fire code. And Republican front runner, Donald Trump, didn’t fail to deliver the campaign style he’s become known for.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican Jeb Bush was back in New Hampshire Thursday. The former Florida governor used a stop at Foss Manufacturing in Hampton to go after GOP rival Donald Trump.  Trump, of course, has been deriding Bush for weeks, but criticism of Trump – at least for now -- is a central message of Bush’s campaign.

Ever since the Tea Party began in 2009, various Republicans have been auditioning to lead this populist revolt. Rand Paul took a chainsaw to the federal budget. Ted Cruz almost shut down the government. Chris Christie and Scott Walker have been bashing Washington elites.

But it wasn't until Donald Trump came along that the populist base of the Republican Party found the right mouthpiece for all its grievances.

In an interview with conservative website Breitbart, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump dug into his opponent Jeb Bush, saying he should lead by speaking English while in the U.S.

"I like Jeb," Trump said, according to Breitbart. "He's a nice man. But he should really set the example by speaking English while in the United States."

This has been the Summer of Trump on the campaign trail. Donald Trump has flown high in the polls, with seemingly nothing emerging to slow his rise.

But as heading into September, here are three hurdles the reigning Republican front-runner might have to contend with that run counter to his success so far:

The current front-runner in the Republican presidential primary, Donald Trump, is sparking a debate about immigration that's beginning to alienate some conservative Latinos.

"He drowns out a lot of the conservative field, and it's very bad for the Republican Party," said Ricky Salabarria, a 22-year-old consultant with a pair of Ray-Ban sunglasses tucked into his pink dress shirt.

Salabarria was among a half-dozen young conservatives at a networking event in Northern Virginia. He's from Florida, and his family is originally from Cuba and Spain.

Donald Trump is spending another week at the top of the GOP polls. Yesterday at an event in South Carolina, he defended his tone, his immigration plan and his hair as real and not a toupee.

Hillary Clinton said this week that she “gets it” that people are concerned about investigations into her use of a private email server as Secretary of State, and she compared Republican attitudes towards women to those of Islamic terrorists.

Donald Trump's summer of defying political gravity is continuing, despite predictions that various missteps would damage him. Instead, he has surged even more after his controversial Fox News debate performance.

But who exactly are the people backing the boisterous billionaire businessman? Some recent polls offer a glimpse into the Trump coalition, which may run strong within a certain section of the GOP but faces many hurdles when it comes to a general election.

File photo by Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Businessman Donald Trump, the front runner among the field of GOP presidential candidates, held his first New Hampshire town hall meeting in Derry Wednesday night.

Trump took roughly a half-dozen questions from the packed house at Pinkerton Academy, one of which targeted his lack of stated policy positions.

“I was coming today and I went on your website to see some of your policy positions and the only thing there is immigration reform,” the man asked. “Can you speak to any of your other plans or policies?”

NHPR

On the Political Front in our Monday morning check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

Here we are in mid-August. The days are getting a bit shorter. Is what one GOP presidential candidate, guess who, has dubbed the  Summer of Trump almost over?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

One thing is clear as throngs of people wind down Alumni Drive on the way up to Winnacunnet High School in Hampton: these folks are not coming out just for the Donald Trump spectacle. They really want him to be president.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump returns to the Granite State Friday, as he continues to lead the pack among presidential GOP hopefuls.

Trump will hold a rally at Winnicunnet High School in Hampton Friday evening.

This is his first trip back to the Granite State since his dust up with Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly, and comments he made about her some called offensive.

"Well, if I ever ran for office, I'd do better as a Democrat than as a Republican," Donald Trump told Playboy in 1990. "And that's not because I'd be more liberal, because I'm conservative. But the working guy would elect me. He likes me."

NHPR

A new polls shows that in New Hampshire, businessman Donald Trump is leading the pack of Republicans in the presidential race.

The NBC News-Marist poll shows Trump with 21 percent support among potential Republican primary voters. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush trails at 14 percent, followed by Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker with 12 percent.

Brady Carlson/NHPR

As brash businessman Donald Trump continues his surprising surge in the national presidential polls, behind the scenes, there’s a well-known GOP operative from New Hampshire pulling the strings.

Corey Lewandowski was the director of the conservative Americans for Prosperity here in the Granite State.

He’s now campaign manager for Donald Trump.

Donald Trump quickly earned the scorn of many veterans' groups this weekend with his controversial comments about Sen. John McCain's military service.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

More than 1,000 people gathered to greet Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Weirs Community Center in Laconia Thursday night -- though only half of them actually made it inside. Although the event reached capacity more than an hour before its start time, nearly all who traveled to the event stuck around to see Trump.

Pages