Donald Trump

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump was characteristically adamant at a recent town hall meeting in Claremont, New Hampshire.

"All I do is tell the truth. I tell the truth."

NHPR/Michael Brindley

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul has pledged to do everything he can from keeping current front-runner Donald Trump from becoming the GOP nominee.

"I think he’s a bad messenger. I think he sends a bad message," the Kentucky Senator said during a campaign stop in Londonderry Saturday. "I think his message is not on limiting power; it’s on give me power. I think that’s a real problem and I’m going to do everything I can to make sure he’s not the nominee."

But Paul also says he'll back Trump if he's the eventual nominee.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Sen. Kelly Ayotte seems to be growing tired of the constant questions about whether she'll support Donald Trump if he's the eventual Republican presidential nominee.

"I think it's a favorite question of the press to ask all of us what we think about Trump, but we are a long way away from Feb. 9," she said Wednesday, when asked about whether she'll support the billionaire businessman.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump used a campaign stop in Windham to continue his spat with the New Hampshire Union Leader newspaper Monday. A Trump also went after former Governor John Sununu. 

Donald Trump has never been shy about taking pokes at New Hampshire's Republican elite. And within two minutes of taking the stage, Trump was deriding the N.H. Union Leader and its publisher Joe McQuaid.

"Its really a dishonest paper, though. It's terrible."

www.unionleader.com

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition most Monday mornings for "On the Political Front."

The New Hampshire Union Leader has been booted as co-sponsor of the lone New Hampshire GOP presidential debate.  The network’s explanation: the Union Leader’s editorials going after GOP frontrunner Donald Trump.

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Businessman Donald Trump is heading back to New Hampshire for a rare daytime campaign rally.

Trump is scheduled to address voters before noon on Monday. His rallies are often held at night, drawing huge crowds and voters who begin waiting in line early in the day for a glimpse of the bombastic GOP front-runner.

His Monday event will be held at the Castleton Banquet and Conference Center in Windham.

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Donald Trump rallied supporters in Claremont Tuesday night. The GOP front-runner ended things with a rapid fire answers to shouted questions from the audience, and some off the cuff shouting of his own.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is dismissing a terrorist propaganda video that uses part of one his stump speeches.

"They use other people," he told CBS' Face the Nation in an interview aired today. "What am I going to do? I have to say what I have to say. And you know what I have to say, there's a problem."

Many Republicans may have sided with Donald Trump's controversial proposal to ban Muslims from entering the U.S., but his rival Jeb Bush predicts that the GOP faithful will eventually oppose the plan and see it his way.

"Trump clearly banning all Muslims would actually be so counterproductive in our efforts to destroy ISIS that it's foolhardy," the former Florida governor told NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview Wednesday in Boston. "I mean, it's beyond ridiculous; it's quite dangerous."

Cheryl Senter, NHPR

Joseph McQuaid, publisher of the New Hampshire Union Leader, might’ve kicked the proverbial hornet’s nest when he penned a front-page editorial calling Republican frontrunner Donald Trump “a crude blowhard with no clear political philosophy.”

But the newspaperman was simply continuing his outlet’s long-running tradition of cutting presidential candidates down to size. 

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

When Donald Trump took the stage in Nashua Monday night, he was greeted by hundreds of people sporting red “Make America Great Again” hats, waving Trump signs and this song, "We're Not Gonna Take It," by Twisted Sister.

During his hour and a half stump speech, the GOP presidential candidate addressed his standard points: building a wall along the southern border, defeating ISIS and bashing the media -- this time the local media.

AP / Flickr/CC

New dynamics have entered the GOP race, with terrorism and national security topping voters' concerns. And the race itself is shaking up, with a slightly smaller group of contenders and the party's establishment openly worried about the staying power of Donald Trump. We'll recap the debate highlights and dig into the issues. 

GUESTS:   

A day before the last Republican presidential debate of the year, two Republican candidates held rallies near the Las Vegas strip, less than a mile apart. In spite of their proximity, the events had almost nothing in common.

Marco Rubio was in a medium-size hotel ballroom, with a few hundred people in attendance. It seemed, at first, that Rubio might struggle to fill the room, as supporters came in slowly. But fill it did.

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"On the Political Front" is our weekly check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.  

Natasha Haverty

Last night Presidential Candidate Donald Trump came to Portsmouth for a few minutes, to pick up an endorsement from the New England’s police union. 

Editor's Note: Some readers might find some of the language below offensive.

This post was updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

Donald Trump has made his most outrageous statement yet in a string of beyond-the-pale utterances.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Tonight Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is scheduled to campaign in Portsmouth. The visit comes in the wake of his call for a “total and and complete shutdown” of Muslims entering the United States.

Trump will start the evening meeting with the New England Police Benevolent Association. This is his first campaign stop in the state since his proposal to bar Muslims from the country.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Senator Kelly Ayotte, New Hampshire’s top Republican elected official, says she disagrees with GOP candidate Donald Trump’s call to ban Muslims from entering the country.

“I do not believe that there should be a religious test in terms of how we decide who’s coming to our country," Ayotte said. "There needs to be a factual, risk-based assessment. We’ve not had a religious test for this and that certainly seems inconsistent with the First Amendment to me.”

But when asked whether she would support Trump if he wins the Republican nomination, Ayotte didn't rule it out.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

For GOP Chair Jennifer Horn, Trump's call for a "total and complete shutdown" on allowing Muslims into the county was too much. In a statement, she called out Trump's policy statement.

"It is un-Republican. It is unconstitutional. And it is un-American."

The state's top elected Republican official, US Senator Kelly Ayotte, wasn't nearly as pointed but made the same basic argument when asked to weigh in Trump's call to ban Muslim immigration.

File photo by Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Donald Trump says he feels guilty for never serving in the Vietnam War because he knows many brave people who did.

Trump's comments came during a Tuesday night event in New Hampshire that offered a more intimate exchange than his typical rallies. He opened the floor for questions and at times kept the audience near silence as he discussed where his patriotism comes from and what advice he'd give to young people.

Sean Hurley

On Monday night, Presidential hopeful Donald Trump spoke to an estimated 8000 people at the Macon Coliseum in Georgia. Later this week he's expected to fill the 5000 seats at a North Carolina arena.  But last night he spoke in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire - population around 350 - at an indoor tennis court converted into a makeshift stage.  

As soon as Donald Trump announced that he'd gained the endorsement of 100 black ministers from across the country on Monday, there were skeptics.

The claim came just days after the presidential candidate said of an African-American Black Lives Matter protester who was beaten up at a Trump event, "Maybe he deserved to be roughed up."

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Presidential candidates Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio will remain on the New Hampshire Presidential Primary ballot. That’s after the state Ballot Law Commission unanimously voted Tuesday to reject a handful of challenges to their qualifications to run for president. 

At every turn, this year's presidential campaign has proved conventional wisdom wrong. The aftermath of the Paris attacks might be another example.

As soon as the attacks were over, a chorus of (establishment) Republican voices predicted that the new focus on national security and terrorism would change the dynamic of the Republican race. This was the tipping point, they declared, that would finally usher out the outsiders leading the polls — Donald Trump and Ben Carson — in favor of more serious, experienced candidates.

WBUR Poll: Trump Maintains Lead In New Hampshire

Nov 18, 2015

Less than three months before New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary, Donald Trump continues to maintain his lead over over the rest of the Republican presidential field in the state, according to a new poll commissioned by NPR member station WBUR.

Political pundits are wondering if Donald Trump had a Howard Dean-like political meltdown moment last night, when, in a 95-minute speech in Iowa, the Republican presidential candidate cursed numerous times and asked “How stupid are the people of Iowa?” in reference to their support of Ben Carson.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

The 8 a.m. “Politics and Eggs” forum was somewhat more subdued than the booming campaign rallies Donald Trump has held in other parts of the state.

But the crowd gathered in at the Manchester Radisson Wednesday morning was — to borrow a favorite descriptor from the candidate himself — still pretty “huge.”

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Donald Trump has been at the front of the Republican presidential pack in New Hampshire since late July — at the moment, outpacing all other candidates in polling averages double digits.

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

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