economics

The Technicality Show

Jul 27, 2015

We’ve all heard of a guilty person getting acquitted of crime because of a “technicality”.  What happens when a law professor discovers a judicial loophole that could make for the perfect crime? On today’s show, it’s all about the technicalities, the loopholes, artful dodges and escapes. From how to get away with murder, to how to turn the lights off when your religion prohibits it. Plus, the most expensive typo in American legislative history.

Stefan / Flickr CC

While some women leave their job when making the choice to become full-time mothers, experts say there is a wide range of other reasons that women aren’t holding on to jobs at the same rates they used to. This, despite the overall economic improvement of the last few years. We’re looking at some of the social, economic, and political factors that are keeping fewer women are in the labor force today.

401kcalculator.org / Flickr / Creative Commons

For years Americans have been warned that longer life spans, increasing healthcare costs, and decreasing support from employer pensions will have serious consequences for the future of retirement. We’ll speak with the author of a new book that offers solutions in both public policy and personal finance.

Sara Plourde

Scarcity is a kind of great equalizer. Whether it be less sleep, security, time, food, money or whatever a person needs, scarcity hijacks the mind, diminishes intelligence, and lowers resistance to temptation. Eldar Shafir, Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton set out to find evidence for what happens to our minds when we have too little – and how scarcity shapes our choices and behaviors.  He's coauthor of the new book is Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much.

Dartmouth professor Charles Wheelan joins us to discuss his best-selling book “Naked Economics: Undressing The Dismal Science”.  Wheelan presents the economic principles behind Federal Reserve policy, the government’s response to the recession, international trade, and more.

GUESTS:

  • Charles Wheelan -  Professor at Dartmouth College, author of the international best-sellers Naked Statistics and the recently revised and updated Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science  

NAFTA Turns Twenty

Dec 3, 2013
Chandu Sadasivan / Flickr Creative Commons

President Bill Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement in December 1993, eliminating all tariffs and trade restrictions among the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.  The treaty, though, has always been controversial in all three nations.  Two decades later, we examine its impacts, and which predictions about it have come true.

GUESTS:

alltogetherfool via flickr Creative Commons

If you don’t have the scratch to buy 10 million stamps, maybe selling seats in college courses is an easier way to make a buck … Joel Eastwood of the Toronto Star, wrote about savvy students at the University of Toronto registering for classes and then selling those spots to students who need that particular course but can’t get in through the normal registration process.

The Weirdest Quick Rich Scheme: Buying Stamps

Oct 9, 2013
farm9 via Flickr Creative Commons

Last month, the United States Postal Service proposed plans to raise the price of a first class stamp from forty-six to forty-nine cents. The change should generate about $2 billion in additional revenue for an institution desperate to stem a projected $6 billion dollar deficit this year.

Meanwhile, the Forever Stamp, introduced in 2006 and impervious to changing price rates, may present an unexpected opportunity for a bold profit. Allison Schraeger is an economist and writer whose work is featured regularly in Quartz, where she and Ritchie King co-wrote a step-by-step guide to making big money from tiny stamps.

purpleslog via Flickr Creative Commons

In a down economy, most folks are happy to find a crumpled fiver in a jacket pocket, or fish out quarters to pay for parking.  Not David Wolman. David is a contributing editor at Wired magazine, and author of the book The End of Money, for which he attempted to spend a year without touching or passing any paper money.  We spoke David when the book was first released.  It’s being released on paperback in October.

Chuck Holton via Flickr Creative Commons

The Boy Scouts of America opened its version of a Disney-esque destination getaway in early July. The Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve includes whitewater rafting, miles of zip line, and an 85,000-seat stadium – all built on ten thousand acres of West Virginia woodland.

California University of Pennsylvania via Flickr Creative Commons

Most people’s understanding of the economy comes from the explanations given by economic experts on the evening news. This may be supplemented by a vaguely remembered college course called ‘Econ 101,’ where we learned the most basic principles behind economics. These simplified explanations may help people to feel as though they understand what is happening in the marketplace, but are they an accurate description of economic theory? Robert Atkinson and Michael Lind think not.

Michael Lind co-wrote the article, “Econ 101 Is Killing America,” for Salon.com. He’s here to discuss why a basic understanding of economic theory may actually hurt more than it helps.

Dollars And Sex

Feb 14, 2013
marinaadshade.com

At its most transparent, Valentine’s Day is a holiday built for consumption. That may sound like a bit of a buzz kill, but there is loads of research activity connecting our romantic ideals and more base human motivations to our decisions to spend and save…mostly spend. Joining us, is Dr. Marina Adshade who teaches Economics at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver. She hit a nerve there in 2008 when she launched an undergraduate course called Economics of Sex and Love. It was an instant hit among students, and led to the launch of the Dollars and Sex blog and now, a book of the same title. It uses market research and economic analysis on matters of the heart and other anatomical bits.

Now that the elections are over, It’s now the number one topic on Capitol Hill. If the parties can’t agree on debt reduction, we’ll see tax increases and spending cuts that many predict could slide us into recession. In New Hampshire, thousands of jobs are said to be on the line. We’ll talk about efforts to avoid this, why some say going over the cliff may not be as damaging as feared and what each scenario could mean for the Granite State.

Guests

For a long time, 'middle class' meant 'comfortable'.  It was a place to strive for and once there, it meant a stable job, a nice home and secure retirement.  But a recent study by the Pew Research Center describes a 'Lost Decade' of the Middle Class, finding this groups to be fewer, poor and gloomier due to the economic crisis.

The Muddle Over Milk

Sep 26, 2012

A new book examines what it calls “the failed economics of the traditional small dairy farm”, blaming a complex, highly regulated market where middlemen and mega-farms always win.  We’ll look at this phenomena in New England, and how the author says there are new models that offer some hope. 

Guest

  • Kirk Kardashian – Senior writer at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and author of "Milk Money: Cash, Cows and the Death of the American Dairy Farm.

The story of how the U.S. wound up with the income tax is the story of two wars, a Supreme Court justice on his death bed, and Donald Duck.

It's also the story of how the government overcame three obstacles.

Obstacle No. 1: Logistics

How do you make sure people pay?

Raj Patel, Sherry Turkle, Bruce Levine, Tyler Cowen and Eliza Griswold...oh, my! We smack a big red bow on our 11 for '11 series of conversations with big thinkers, analyze their predictive powers, and talk about their spheres of influence.  How  

We also look at some folks who, in retrospect, should have made the list, like leading edge tweeter Evan Hill, and music critic and retro-downer Simon Reynolds