Economy

 New Hampshire Public Radio in partnership with the Business and Industry Association and New Hampshire Business Review present a forum between the Democratic and Republican nominees for governor.

The discussion will be moderated by Laura Knoy, host of The Exchange, and panelists will consist of journalists from NHBR and NHPR

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With politicians promising to create so-called "good jobs", we look at what government can and can't do in this area.  Also, rents in the Granite State keep rising, up fifteen percent in the last five years.  And New Hampshire joins a national lawsuit challenging the merger of two health insurance companies, Anthem and Cigna. 


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The New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development launched an initiative this week to help industries maintain their workforce.

Young people in New Hampshire are gravitating away from manufacturing jobs. And that's not ideal, because manufacturing is the largest driver of the New Hampshire economy.

The Manufacturing Sector Partnership creates a state-wide collaboration for industries to address their workforce needs.

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These days, the story of New Hampshire’s economy is kind of a “good news, bad news” tale. The good news: Unemployment is low, at least on paper, and wages seem to be rising, if slowly. The bad news: Employers are struggling to fill positions, and lots of prospective employees say they can’t find the kind of stable, full-time work they’d like to have.

It’s easy for Americans to see the Brexit debate as a British issue. But the personal finance website Bankrate.com says if Britons vote tomorrow to exit the European Union, European vacations will likely be cheaper, mortgage rates might fall, the stock market could drop, and it would be harder to find a job in Britain.

Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins talks to economist Diane Swonk about the impact of Brexit on Americans.

What is your opinion on the Brexit? Let us know in a Here & Now poll:

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  The state is set to release new employment figures this week. 

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A new state forecast shows New Hampshire will see continued job growth through 2024, but it won't be fast. 

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We examine several key indicators and their impact on the Granite state.  One is rising inflation.  Another is consumer debt:  Americans are spending more, but we're also borrowing -- to the tune of nearly one trillion dollars.  Also, a new report finds a worrisome trend: business formation in small towns and rural counties has dropped dramatically.

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 A coalition in the Monadnock Region is pushing for more local businesses to pay workers at least $15 an hour.

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  The state is set to release new unemployment figures this week. 

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On the Titanic, metal gates kept the unwashed from the upper crust - today's cruises offer high-rollers seclusion using key cards and velvet ropes.Today, travel perks in the new Gilded Age.

Then, from Little House on the Prairie, to the pastoral scenes printed on butter packages,  Americans tend to think of the agrarian past as wholesome and simpler . But, the real family farm has not always been pure or pretty.

Plus, Sean Hurley searches for buried treasure with a group of metal detectives.

NHPR Staff

 

Lawmakers are receiving a series of briefings on New Hampshire's labor market, economy and demographic challenges.

Economists and other experts are making presentations Monday to House and Senate lawmakers who sit on key committees that determine how money is raised and spent in New Hampshire. The briefings are open to the public and will be live streamed on the state's website.

NHPR

After years of little to no growth in wages, Granite State workers may see their paychecks fatten.  Spring has sprung for the construction industry, especially on the Seacoast and in the Manchester area.   And a national ranking finds what many New Hampshire parents already know:  child care here is among the priciest in the nation.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Residents of a mobile home park in Portsmouth recently purchased the land they’ve been living on for decades. This park joins a growing number of other mobile home communities to do the same. When Kathy Ireland received a letter last year that said the mobile-home park she lives in was being sold, she wasn’t quite sure how to take it.

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  More than two dozen employers and job assistance organizations will take part in a job fair this week in Laconia. 

Sean Hurley

It hasn't been a great year for skiers or ski areas across the Granite State.  But it's not just the mountains that suffered from the lack of snow.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Officials in the North Country are fighting a bill that would take a tax break designed to encourage business to locate in economically troubled Coos County and offer it statewide.

In 2008, as Coos staggered from the closing of paper plants, the state approved a bill proposed by Rep. Fred King of Colebrook that would provide a tax break for business-related construction – assuming the local jurisdiction approved.

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  The state is set to release its latest unemployment figures. 

 

A new poll shows New Hampshire residents remaining optimistic about the state's economy and only slightly less optimistic about the national economy.

The University of New Hampshire Survey Center polled 534 adults for the Business and Industry Association's Report on Consumer Confidence. Nearly half said they expect New Hampshire businesses to do well in the next year, while just over 40 percent said businesses nationwide are in for good financial times.

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Several bills address the minimum wage this legislative season, including one to increase it gradually and exclude workers under age eighteen – a provision some say could bolster bipartisan support. But concerns remain about unintended consequences, especially among small businesses owners.

GUESTS:

NHPR

It’s become a common theme: voters are anxious – about national security, income inequality, and a government they see as unable to confront the country’s problems. Campaigns have tapped into these sentiments, often striking an angry tone. We’ll explore the extent of this discontent – and whether it's exceptional to this campaign season.

GUESTS:

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A new forecast projects 2016 will have one of the strongest real estate market in a decade. 

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Many analysts seem to be taking the stock markets recent swings in stride, saying the broader U.S. economy is on stronger footing.  Still, there are concerns, especially China's economic woes.

GUESTS:

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The state is set to release its latest jobs numbers on Wednesday, giving us a final look at the New Hampshire jobs picture in 2015. 

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Another set of housing data shows a rise in New Hampshire home sales in October. The latest New England Housing Report from RE/MAX INTEGRA showed there were 1,979 home sales in the state last month.

That number was more than 8 percent higher than the 1,819 sold in October 2014.

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  The latest monthly report from the Northern New England Real Estate Network suggests the housing market is beginning to slow down for the year.

But the data also appears to show the market remains stronger than it was at this time a year ago.

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New Hampshire continues to see slow but steady growth in its housing market. 

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State officials and representatives of three New Hampshire companies will head to the United Arab Emirates this month for an industry trade show.

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Also known as the “banking act of 1933,” this law stemmed from the 1920s stock market crash and Great Depression that followed, with restrictions on banks and other financial institutions. Glass-Steagall was overturned about twenty years ago, but some are pushing to bring it back.

GUESTS:

Sheryl Rich-Kern for NHPR

  The U.S. Department of Labor is looking to gather wage data for New Hampshire’s building and construction industries. 

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