Education

Best of Public Radio
3:00 pm
Sun September 22, 2013

Second-Chance Diploma: Examining The GED

Jean Griggs, GED student, at home with Jalisa Parker, her son’s girlfriend. Parker is helping Griggs with her Academy of Hope math homework.
Credit Emily Hanford / American RadioWorks

Today's workers need more education and skills than ever before. But 39 million adults in the United States don't have even the most basic credential: a high school diploma. Many hope their ticket to a better job is passing a test called the GED. But critics say the test is too easy and hardly the equivalent of a high school education.

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Best of Public Radio
3:00 pm
Sun September 15, 2013

One Child At A Time: Custom Learning In The Digital Age

8th grade language arts students in Mooresville, NC work with laptops; the computers give them personalized assignments to improve the skills that they need to work on.
Credit Emily Hanford / American RadioWorks

Researchers have long known the best way to learn is with a personal tutor. But tutoring is expensive. Providing the benefits of tutoring to everyone hasn't been possible. Now, experts say technology creates new ways for schools to customize education for each student.

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NH News
8:35 am
Thu September 12, 2013

N.H. High School Asks Parents To Join 'Molly' Conversation

Credit tanjila via Flickr Creative Commons

A New Hampshire high school has sent out an email to parents asking them to talk to their children about the party drug "Molly," which has been linked to two college student deaths.

School officials said they have not seen any evidence of Molly, considered a slang reference to the drug Ecstasy, on campus at Pembroke Academy. But they said they want the parents of their 875 students to know more about the drug.

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Word of Mouth
10:32 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Has This Public School District Found The Formula For Educating American Kids?

Credit Indiana Public Media via Flickr Creative Commons

Like most touchy issues, few people agree on precisely how to cope with America’s public school system.  Proposed solutions for some failing districts include switching to charter schools, installing fresh leadership, stricter curriculum, and more.  Union City, New Jersey has defied the odds – once on the brink of being shut down, Union City has become a model district simply by going back to the basics, and sticking with them.  David L. Kirp, is a professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley and author of eighteen books on education and urban issues. His latest is Improbable Scholars: The Rebirth of a Great American School System and a Strategy for America’s Schools.

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Word of Mouth
9:28 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Are Foster Kids Better Off Without Families?

Credit loveiswritten via Flickr Creative Commons

Statistically speaking, American foster children face a steep uphill battle. A 2010 study showed nearly 25 percent of foster care children end up homeless at some point after exiting the system, and teen girls in foster care were more likely to become pregnant than to get adopted. One fledgling foster care experiment has done away with the foster family system in favor of a mutually supportive group-home. The San Pasqual Academy is a $14 million dollar nonprofit based in San Diego that houses 180 foster kids. Natasha Vargas-Cooper is a freelance journalist who wrote about San Pasqual for Pacific Standard.

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Foodstuffs
5:39 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Some School Vending Machines Are Cutting Back On Sugary Drinks

Part of the effort to curb child obesity in the US has been to rethink vending machines – in particular, those offering sugary drinks at schools. The theory is that students make healthier choices when they have healthier options in front of them.

And new research from Dartmouth College shows the contents of those machines are changing – less sugar, more bottled water. But not every school is changing in the same way.

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The Exchange
4:00 pm
Sat August 31, 2013

The Common Core: Coming To A School Near You (Rebroadcast)

New Hampshire is among some forty states to adopt this more rigorous set of standards for math and language arts in public schools. But just as this bi-partisan effort becomes reality, the system is facing some backlash from both the right and left. We’ll find out more about Common Core and the challenges it faces getting off the ground.

Guests:

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Children Learn To Be Good Stewards Of The Great Bay

Great Bay Discovery Center in Greenland, N.H. April 8, 2013.
Cheryl Senter

The Great Bay Stewards work to preserve and protect the Great Bay estuary through education, land protection and research. Sharon Musselman, one of the educators, is recently a retired teacher who often brought her own classes here to explore this ecosystem.

"I'm excited to be here at Great Bay Discover center," Musselman said. "I brought my first grade class to Great Bay for 15 years because it is such a great experience for first graders."

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Word of Mouth
1:21 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Handwriting Is Not A Lost Art Thanks To A Computerized Pen

Credit lernstift.com

People often lament that handwriting is a lost art. But if the creators of a new educational tool have their way, calligraphy will never die out completely. The Lernstift – or “learning pen”– is a working computerized pen which uses vibration to help improve handwriting, and is projected to go into production this fall.   Word of Mouth’s Molly Donahue spoke with Daniel Kaesmacher who helped develop the Lernstift, to learn a little bit more about it.

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Word of Mouth
9:15 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Why Econ 101 Is Ruining Us

Credit California University of Pennsylvania via Flickr Creative Commons

Most people’s understanding of the economy comes from the explanations given by economic experts on the evening news. This may be supplemented by a vaguely remembered college course called ‘Econ 101,’ where we learned the most basic principles behind economics. These simplified explanations may help people to feel as though they understand what is happening in the marketplace, but are they an accurate description of economic theory? Robert Atkinson and Michael Lind think not.

Michael Lind co-wrote the article, “Econ 101 Is Killing America,” for Salon.com. He’s here to discuss why a basic understanding of economic theory may actually hurt more than it helps.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Cornucopia Project Filling Kids' Cups

Third graders at DCS tending their garden.
Ellingwood

The Cornucopia Project teaches kids to grow food -- and to make a lifetime of healthy eating choices. Susan Ellingwood and her third-graders in Dublin are old hands in their school garden -- which was established with help from the Cornucopia Project.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat June 8, 2013

The Raymond Coalition Steers Youth Toward Smart Choices

Credit Courtesy of The Raymond Coalition

The Raymond Coalition for Youth is committed to helping kids make healthy choices and form positive habits. Through its "Youth Action" program, the Coalition empowers teenagers, like Kirsten Roman, to involve themselves in community outreach. "I was really interested in helping out the community more, and to help my peers make good choices," says Roman. "We focus on positive choice: not doing drugs or alcohol; eating healthy and exercising."

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All Things Considered
5:46 pm
Fri June 7, 2013

Three Exeter High School Teachers Resign After Misconduct Allegations

This is a time of year when educators and students are turning their minds toward graduation or summer plans.

In Exeter, though, many people are focusing on something more troubling: three teachers at Exeter High School have been accused of misconduct. All three have resigned, including one of them today.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu June 6, 2013

The Coming Of Common Core

Credit avinash1936 via Flickr/Creative Commons

All week, NHPR Education reporter Sam Evans Brown has been looking at a massive transition underway the Granite State, a new set of school standards known as the Common Core.  Educators nationwide have been shifting toward this new system. We’ll find out kind of discussions are taking place at our local schools among teachers, principals and students. 

Guests

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Taking Stock of STEM

Credit Shyam Subramanian via Flickr Creative Commons

The subjects of science, technology, engineering, and math are all the rage these days among politicians, business and education leaders who say we need more emphasis on these subjects to compete globally. But others say we’re going overboard on STEM and that society benefits from a broader approach that includes the arts, communication, and critical thinking.

Guests:

Fred Kocher: President of the New Hampshire High Tech Council and founder and president of Kocher and Company, a marketing and communications firm.

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