Education

NH News
11:05 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

No New School For Newmarket

Principal Christopher Andriski poses with Megan Boyle, an 11th grade English teacher at Newmarket High School. They are standing in an ESL study room that doubles as a storage space.
Credit Emily Corwin / NHPR

  Voters in the town of Newmarket have turned down a controversial new school building.  The $45 million dollar new school would have replaced the existing junior and senior high school, part of which is 90 years old.

Newmarket Principal Christopher Andriski  says the building isn't modern enough to accomodate what he calls "twenty-first century learning." It also violates fire and safety codes, as well as requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act.  Andriski says he’s disappointed with the results:

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The Exchange
1:39 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Preparing N.H.'s Teachers For The Classroom

Credit EasternMennoniteUniversity / Flickr Creative Commons

We finish a two-part series on the teaching profession, with a look at how we prepare our teachers.  After criticism claiming credentialing standards in the U.S. are lax, many states, including New Hampshire, are trying to raise the bar and turn out more qualified teachers. Some say more in-classroom experience is key. But there are challenges to such changes, including the expense.  

GUESTS:

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Evaluating New Hampshire's Educators

Credit rbcullen / Flickr Creative Commons

Today, defining a good teacher has become far more complex than we might remember from our own schooldays. Many states now rely on student test scores as a major way to assess teacher quality, while others also use classroom observations, student evaluations, and lesson plan reviews. Backers of tougher assessments argue that since U.S. students as a whole are lagging behind other industrialized nations, something needs to be done.  But others worry that these data-driven judgments diminish what’s really important:  teachers using their skills and creativity to engage with students .

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NH News
1:08 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Bill To Pull N.H. Out Of Common Core Goes Before House Committee

Credit Ben McLeod / Flickr Creative Commons

The House Education committee continued a hearing Thursday on legislation that would require New Hampshire to pull the plug on implementing the Common Core standards.

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All Things Considered
5:15 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Keene State Pres.: College Often At 'Intersection' Between Education, Economy

Keene State College president Anne Huot says her focus since starting in the position last summer has been on listening – hearing what’s been on the minds of students, faculty and staff, business and community leaders and public officials.

Anne Huot joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to talk about some of what she’s heard and what she hopes to bring to Keene State in the coming years.

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Word of Mouth
2:00 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

2.19.14: Jeopardy, Law & Order, Sad YouTube, Sexism & Nick Fairall

Credit Esther Vargas via flickr Creative Commons

Today on Word of Mouth, we take a trip to the land of Trebek for a lesson on Jeopardy theory. And who doesn't love a good Netflix binge? But what if that Netflix binge takes a year and a half and covers 20 years worth of episodes? We hear from the man who watched 456 episodes of Law & Order to document the use of computers in the show.

Next, we head over to Sad YouTube, a project meant to highlight humanity in a sea of negative YouTube comments.

Our last two segments bring us back to reality. First, a look at sexism in the Philosophy department of University of Colorado-Boulder. And finally, NHPR's Amanda Loder visits the NH ski club of a US Olympian. 


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All Things Considered
5:26 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Teaching Teachers To Teach Civility And Empathy

A professor at the University of New Hampshire who studies school violence says teaching our students civility and empathy can help make schools safer for kids.

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Giving Matters
12:14 am
Sat February 1, 2014

Children Learn To Be Good Stewards Of The Great Bay

Great Bay Discovery Center in Greenland, N.H.
Cheryl Senter

The Great Bay Stewards work to preserve and protect the Great Bay estuary through education, land protection and research. Sharon Musselman, one of the educators, is recently a retired teacher who often brought her own classes here to explore this ecosystem.

"I'm excited to be here at Great Bay Discover center," Musselman said. "I brought my first grade class to Great Bay for 15 years because it is such a great experience for first graders."

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NH News
11:53 am
Wed January 22, 2014

House OKs Bill Giving In-State Tuition To Children Of Undocumented Immigrants

Credit NHPR Staff

The New Hampshire House passed a measure Tuesday that would give in-state tuition at University of New Hampshire schools to the children of undocumented immigrants.

By a vote of 188 to 155, the Democratic-led House moved the bill on to the Senate, where it faces a Republican majority and likely a much tougher test.

Representative Rick Ladd of Haverhill says the state should be supporting all students attending its public schools.

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Word of Mouth
9:51 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Why Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) Failed

Credit Corie Howell via Flickr Creative Commons

Sebastian Thrun, the man behind perhaps the most disruptive idea to hit higher education -- massive open online courses or more commonly... MOOCs -- has decided to pack it in. While some traditional educators might be saying “I told you so”, proponents of online education are worried about what this shift means for its future. Rebecca Schuman is education columnist for Slate and adjunct professor at the University of Missouri. She wrote about Sebastian Thrun -- the acknowledged godfather of MOOC’s -- and his pivot away from them.

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Giving Matters
12:41 am
Sat December 7, 2013

The Raymond Coalition Steers Youth Toward Smart Choices

Credit Courtesy of The Raymond Coalition

The Raymond Coalition for Youth is committed to helping kids make healthy choices and form positive habits. Through its "Youth Action" program, the Coalition empowers teenagers, like Kirsten Roman, to involve themselves in community outreach. "I was really interested in helping out the community more, and to help my peers make good choices," says Roman. "We focus on positive choice: not doing drugs or alcohol; eating healthy and exercising."

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Younger Granite Staters And Workforce Preparation

Credit Barks Of Love / Flickr Creative Commons

We continue our series, 'How We Work: Five Years Later,' with a look at younger Granite Staters and how they’re prepared for the workforce.  We’ll examine how we educate students, from high school to college, and how that’s changed since the recession.

GUESTS:

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat November 16, 2013

Upper Valley Educators Institute Prepares Teachers For Their Careers

Credit Creative Common/Flickr audiolucistore

Professionals who dream of changing careers and becoming teachers have been doing so with the help of the Upper Valley Educators Institute since 1969.

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NH News
4:11 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Community Colleges' New Amenities Meet New Needs With New Fees

Zach Aumand sits with his friend Ryan Leavitt at Great Bay Community College's current Student Center.
Credit Emily Corwin

As a slow economy pinches family budgets and the cost of college tuition climbs ever higher, more high school graduates are choosing to start their educations at community colleges. As those students demand a more traditional college experience, community colleges in Nashua, Manchester, and now the Great Bay are building in new athletic facilities, teams and clubs.  

Michael Fischer is thumbing through the architectural renderings for Great Bay Community College’s new $5 million dollar recreational facility.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon November 4, 2013

The Uproar Over Common Core.

New Hampshire adopted these new public school standards several years ago... one of forty five states to do so. Now, while many districts are on the path, more pushback has developed in some communities, especially from groups suspicious of outside involvement in local public education.  Today we'll look at the current debates around Common Core.

Guests:

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Word of Mouth
2:01 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Have The Works Of Shakespeare Been Played Out?

William Shakespeare

For more than four hundred years, the works of William Shakespeare have given us language to describe the human condition. The Bard’s works have been interpreted on countless stages, film and television adaptations, and pulled apart in classrooms and campuses all over the world. As the theses count and analyses dedicated to Shakespeare continue to grow, a few academics question if there’s anything new to say about Shakespeare. That’s also the title of an article by Matthew Reisz, reporter and features writer for the Times of London’s Higher Education blog, covering intellectual affairs in the arts and social sciences.

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Word of Mouth
1:58 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Eric Booth Teaches Artists To Teach Others

Credit Viewminder via flickr Creative Commons

Education policy in the U.S. is currently laser-focused on engaging students in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math—or “STEM” subjects. The goal is to prepare future generations to prosper in the new global economy. But where do the creative arts fit into this equation? How can art and music education help drive innovation? Eric Booth is a pioneer in art education, and is the author of several books, including, “The Music Teaching Artist’s Bible.” He is also an artist, an actor, and musician and is widely referred to as the father of the teaching artist profession.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Rebroadcast: Taking Stock of STEM

Credit Shyam Subramanian / Flickr Creative Commons

The subjects of science, technology, engineering, and math are all the rage these days among politicians, business and education leaders who say we need more emphasis on these subjects to compete globally. But others say we’re going overboard on STEM and that society benefits from a broader approach that includes the arts, communication, and critical thinking.

Guests:

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Best of Public Radio
2:00 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Breaking Ground: Yesterday's Dropouts

Every year more than one million students fail to graduate from high school on time. But we rarely explore what happens next. What are these students’ lives like 10, 20, even 40 years after they leave the classroom? Do they ever get a second chance?

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NH News
8:26 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Playing Tag Against The Rules At Nashua School

An elementary school in Nashua is reminding parents and students that playing "tag" violates the school's longtime "no contact" rule for recess games.

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NH News
2:11 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Report: Soaring Student Debt In NH A Result Of Several Factors

A new report attempts to get to the bottom of why student debt is so high among New Hampshire colleges and universities.

The report’s conclusion?

There is no one single answer.

The report, commissioned by Granite State Management and Resources, cites several key reasons, including the lack of low-cost public colleges.

Research Brian Gottlob says New Hampshire also has a higher average income, which leads to families receiving less need-based aid.

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NH News
3:41 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

UNH Gets $20M Gift - 2nd Largest In History - From 'Cosby Show' Producer

Marcy Carsey
Credit University of New Hampshire

Television producer Marcy Carsey has given $20 million to her alma mater, the University of New Hampshire.

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All Things Considered
5:10 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

N.H. Teacher Of The Year Wants To Prepare Students For A Changing World

Pinkerton Academy teacher Joe Lee (left) was named 2014 New Hampshire Teacher of the Year.
Credit NHPR / Michael Brindley

Today New Hampshire’s Education Commissioner Virginia Barry announced the winner of the 2014 New Hampshire Teacher of the Year award.

Joe Lee teaches social studies at Pinkerton Academy in Derry; he also coaches the school's golf and hockey teams, and serves as advisor to the China exchange program.

He spoke about the award and his job with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson.

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Word of Mouth
1:03 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

When Field Trips Get Cut, What Are Kids Losing?

Credit Dan Pancamo via flickr Creative Commons

Those of us who went to public school in New Hampshire will likely recall hopping on the school bus for a visit to the Museum of Science in Boston or Sturbridge Village. For decades, schools have embraced field trips as positive and popular learning experiences.  Today, museums, cultural institutions and the American Association of School Administrators report a steep drop in the number of field trips, and more than half of American schools did away with learning excursions altogether in 2010.

But what are kids losing with the cutting of field trips? Jay Phillip Greene is endowed chair and head of the Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas and a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute.

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Word of Mouth
11:54 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Local Kids Stalk Birds Of Prey...For Science!

Here in Concord, flocks of fourth graders are boarding school buses to get a glimpse of something you definitely won’t see in a classroom: falcons.  Right now, birds of prey are migrating in massive numbers from their breeding grounds in the north to their wintering grounds down south. Independent producer Jack Rodolico met up with a group of kid scientists on a field trip at the Carter Hill apple orchard, and filed this report. 

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Best of Public Radio
3:00 pm
Sun September 22, 2013

Second-Chance Diploma: Examining The GED

Jean Griggs, GED student, at home with Jalisa Parker, her son’s girlfriend. Parker is helping Griggs with her Academy of Hope math homework.
Credit Emily Hanford / American RadioWorks

Today's workers need more education and skills than ever before. But 39 million adults in the United States don't have even the most basic credential: a high school diploma. Many hope their ticket to a better job is passing a test called the GED. But critics say the test is too easy and hardly the equivalent of a high school education.

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Best of Public Radio
3:00 pm
Sun September 15, 2013

One Child At A Time: Custom Learning In The Digital Age

8th grade language arts students in Mooresville, NC work with laptops; the computers give them personalized assignments to improve the skills that they need to work on.
Credit Emily Hanford / American RadioWorks

Researchers have long known the best way to learn is with a personal tutor. But tutoring is expensive. Providing the benefits of tutoring to everyone hasn't been possible. Now, experts say technology creates new ways for schools to customize education for each student.

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NH News
8:35 am
Thu September 12, 2013

N.H. High School Asks Parents To Join 'Molly' Conversation

Credit tanjila via Flickr Creative Commons

A New Hampshire high school has sent out an email to parents asking them to talk to their children about the party drug "Molly," which has been linked to two college student deaths.

School officials said they have not seen any evidence of Molly, considered a slang reference to the drug Ecstasy, on campus at Pembroke Academy. But they said they want the parents of their 875 students to know more about the drug.

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Word of Mouth
10:32 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Has This Public School District Found The Formula For Educating American Kids?

Credit Indiana Public Media via Flickr Creative Commons

Like most touchy issues, few people agree on precisely how to cope with America’s public school system.  Proposed solutions for some failing districts include switching to charter schools, installing fresh leadership, stricter curriculum, and more.  Union City, New Jersey has defied the odds – once on the brink of being shut down, Union City has become a model district simply by going back to the basics, and sticking with them.  David L. Kirp, is a professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley and author of eighteen books on education and urban issues. His latest is Improbable Scholars: The Rebirth of a Great American School System and a Strategy for America’s Schools.

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Word of Mouth
9:28 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Are Foster Kids Better Off Without Families?

Credit loveiswritten via Flickr Creative Commons

Statistically speaking, American foster children face a steep uphill battle. A 2010 study showed nearly 25 percent of foster care children end up homeless at some point after exiting the system, and teen girls in foster care were more likely to become pregnant than to get adopted. One fledgling foster care experiment has done away with the foster family system in favor of a mutually supportive group-home. The San Pasqual Academy is a $14 million dollar nonprofit based in San Diego that houses 180 foster kids. Natasha Vargas-Cooper is a freelance journalist who wrote about San Pasqual for Pacific Standard.

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