Brainlesssteel via Flickr CC

The University of New Hampshire says close to 3,400 first-year students are entering the school this fall — its largest incoming class ever.

This year's first-year class saw an increase of 7 percent in the number of in-state students over last year, up to over 1,400. President Mark Huddleston says UNH attributes that at least partially to the restoration of state funding that allowed the school to freeze in-state tuition for two years.

Previously, the largest class to enter the university was in 2006 with 3,079 students.

The first day of classes is Sept. 2.

The community college in Concord, New Hampshire, has a new president.

Susan Dunton's experience in college administration, academic affairs and student services spans three decades at Lesley College, the Harvard Divinity School and Fisher College in the Boston area; Bethel University in McKenzie, Tennessee; and Fontbonne University in St. Louis.

She has worked on forming partnerships between community college and four-year research and technical institutions and developed academic programs for workforce needs.

Woodley Wonderworks via Flickr CC

Gov. Peter Shumlin has signed into law a bill calling for every 3- and 4-year-old in Vermont to have access to at least 10 hours a week of publicly funded, pre-kindergarten education.

Backers of the bill say it will add about $10 million a year in costs to the state's Education Fund by 2021. But they say the measure will save much more in the long run because many of the children will be given a good enough educational start that special education and corrections costs will be reduced.

alamosbasement / Flickr/CC

The original legislation to allow charters schools in New Hampshire passed way back in 1995, but it would take another ten years before the first of these publically funded independent learning facilities was opened.  Since then charter school have had their ups and downs in the state: many had a hard time getting off the ground, a few had to close their doors, some have been criticized for not being alternative enough from their public school counterparts. There was even a moratorium on new facilities for two years.

The Boys and Girls Club is more than a place to simply do homework or hang out with friends. Brittany Wheeler joined the Concord chapter four years ago, during her first year of high school. The club fosters a sense of community among the participants of its after-school program. As Wheeler says, it’s a place where kids “can feel safe after school and not get into trouble.”

Charlotte Albright for VPR

Every three, four, and five-year-old  in Vermont will be eligible for state-subsidized preschool, under new legislation  that Governor Shumlin has promised to sign into law. Many school districts already offer early education programs, but they vary widely in structure and quality. So a lot of details have to be worked out as the state sews together what is now a patchwork of programs.  

Cloudtail via flickr Creative Commons

Have a taste for variety? From human-like bonobos to beauty pageants, we offer the variety you crave. Join us for our Tuesday show and share comments and suggestions on Twitter and Facebook! (Praise also welcome).

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments

Via UNH website

A 2013 report says 3,095 international students pursued higher education in New Hampshire; that was up 6.3 percent from the previous year. That report also estimates the foreign student expenditure in the state at $103 million dollars. To get an idea about the trend and what it means for schools both here and nationally, I spoke with Karin Fischer, a senior writer at the Chronicle of Higher Education. She covers international education issues.  

A construction company and school officials say the new elementary school in Unity, New Hampshire, is expected to open Sept. 2.

The project had been delayed due to various problems. Earlier this year, residents approved a $2.75 million bond to complete it.

The Eagle Times reports Ron Bauer, executive vice president of Trumbull-Nelson, the construction company, said things are on track. He said most of the dry wall is now up, framing changes have been completed and installation of windows should be done at the end of the week.

The North Country Teacher Certification Program is a collaboration between Plymouth State University and White Mountains Community College. The program aims to increase the number of highly qualified teachers in the North Country. 

Amelia Alton was a pre-school teacher with more than 20 years of experience, who wanted to be a classroom teacher, “I always wanted to try my hand at the first and second grade level. But, I needed a different certification.” In 2010, with the help of the NCTCP, Alton went back to college and received her certification.

Belmont Students Aim To Change 'Red Raider' Mascot

Apr 17, 2014

Three Belmont High School students are taking on an issue few adults would tackle these days.

Student Council members Andre Bragg, Taylor Becker and Ashley Fenimore led a forum Wednesday night where they asked the community to consider whether the school’s mascot – “Red Raider” – was offensive to Native Americans.

The issue came up recently in a Social Studies class and the Council thought the question was significant enough to begin a public dialog.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

The former superintendent of the Manchester School District has died following a cancer diagnosis made just weeks after stepping down from the post last year.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

  Voters in the town of Newmarket have turned down a controversial new school building.  The $45 million dollar new school would have replaced the existing junior and senior high school, part of which is 90 years old.

Newmarket Principal Christopher Andriski  says the building isn't modern enough to accomodate what he calls "twenty-first century learning." It also violates fire and safety codes, as well as requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act.  Andriski says he’s disappointed with the results:

EasternMennoniteUniversity / Flickr Creative Commons

We finish a two-part series on the teaching profession, with a look at how we prepare our teachers.  After criticism claiming credentialing standards in the U.S. are lax, many states, including New Hampshire, are trying to raise the bar and turn out more qualified teachers. Some say more in-classroom experience is key. But there are challenges to such changes, including the expense.  


rbcullen / Flickr Creative Commons

Today, defining a good teacher has become far more complex than we might remember from our own schooldays. Many states now rely on student test scores as a major way to assess teacher quality, while others also use classroom observations, student evaluations, and lesson plan reviews. Backers of tougher assessments argue that since U.S. students as a whole are lagging behind other industrialized nations, something needs to be done.  But others worry that these data-driven judgments diminish what’s really important:  teachers using their skills and creativity to engage with students .

Ben McLeod / Flickr Creative Commons

The House Education committee continued a hearing Thursday on legislation that would require New Hampshire to pull the plug on implementing the Common Core standards.

Keene State College president Anne Huot says her focus since starting in the position last summer has been on listening – hearing what’s been on the minds of students, faculty and staff, business and community leaders and public officials.

Anne Huot joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to talk about some of what she’s heard and what she hopes to bring to Keene State in the coming years.

Esther Vargas via flickr Creative Commons

Today on Word of Mouth, we take a trip to the land of Trebek for a lesson on Jeopardy theory. And who doesn't love a good Netflix binge? But what if that Netflix binge takes a year and a half and covers 20 years worth of episodes? We hear from the man who watched 456 episodes of Law & Order to document the use of computers in the show.

Next, we head over to Sad YouTube, a project meant to highlight humanity in a sea of negative YouTube comments.

Our last two segments bring us back to reality. First, a look at sexism in the Philosophy department of University of Colorado-Boulder. And finally, NHPR's Amanda Loder visits the NH ski club of a US Olympian. 

A professor at the University of New Hampshire who studies school violence says teaching our students civility and empathy can help make schools safer for kids.

Cheryl Senter

The Great Bay Stewards work to preserve and protect the Great Bay estuary through education, land protection and research. Sharon Musselman, one of the educators, is recently a retired teacher who often brought her own classes here to explore this ecosystem.

"I'm excited to be here at Great Bay Discover center," Musselman said. "I brought my first grade class to Great Bay for 15 years because it is such a great experience for first graders."

NHPR Staff

The New Hampshire House passed a measure Tuesday that would give in-state tuition at University of New Hampshire schools to the children of undocumented immigrants.

By a vote of 188 to 155, the Democratic-led House moved the bill on to the Senate, where it faces a Republican majority and likely a much tougher test.

Representative Rick Ladd of Haverhill says the state should be supporting all students attending its public schools.

Corie Howell via Flickr Creative Commons

Sebastian Thrun, the man behind perhaps the most disruptive idea to hit higher education -- massive open online courses or more commonly... MOOCs -- has decided to pack it in. While some traditional educators might be saying “I told you so”, proponents of online education are worried about what this shift means for its future. Rebecca Schuman is education columnist for Slate and adjunct professor at the University of Missouri. She wrote about Sebastian Thrun -- the acknowledged godfather of MOOC’s -- and his pivot away from them.

Courtesy of The Raymond Coalition

The Raymond Coalition for Youth is committed to helping kids make healthy choices and form positive habits. Through its "Youth Action" program, the Coalition empowers teenagers, like Kirsten Roman, to involve themselves in community outreach. "I was really interested in helping out the community more, and to help my peers make good choices," says Roman. "We focus on positive choice: not doing drugs or alcohol; eating healthy and exercising."

Barks Of Love / Flickr Creative Commons

We continue our series, 'How We Work: Five Years Later,' with a look at younger Granite Staters and how they’re prepared for the workforce.  We’ll examine how we educate students, from high school to college, and how that’s changed since the recession.


Creative Common/Flickr audiolucistore

Professionals who dream of changing careers and becoming teachers have been doing so with the help of the Upper Valley Educators Institute since 1969.

Emily Corwin

As a slow economy pinches family budgets and the cost of college tuition climbs ever higher, more high school graduates are choosing to start their educations at community colleges. As those students demand a more traditional college experience, community colleges in Nashua, Manchester, and now the Great Bay are building in new athletic facilities, teams and clubs.  

Michael Fischer is thumbing through the architectural renderings for Great Bay Community College’s new $5 million dollar recreational facility.

New Hampshire adopted these new public school standards several years ago... one of forty five states to do so. Now, while many districts are on the path, more pushback has developed in some communities, especially from groups suspicious of outside involvement in local public education.  Today we'll look at the current debates around Common Core.


For more than four hundred years, the works of William Shakespeare have given us language to describe the human condition. The Bard’s works have been interpreted on countless stages, film and television adaptations, and pulled apart in classrooms and campuses all over the world. As the theses count and analyses dedicated to Shakespeare continue to grow, a few academics question if there’s anything new to say about Shakespeare. That’s also the title of an article by Matthew Reisz, reporter and features writer for the Times of London’s Higher Education blog, covering intellectual affairs in the arts and social sciences.

Viewminder via flickr Creative Commons

Education policy in the U.S. is currently laser-focused on engaging students in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math—or “STEM” subjects. The goal is to prepare future generations to prosper in the new global economy. But where do the creative arts fit into this equation? How can art and music education help drive innovation? Eric Booth is a pioneer in art education, and is the author of several books, including, “The Music Teaching Artist’s Bible.” He is also an artist, an actor, and musician and is widely referred to as the father of the teaching artist profession.

Shyam Subramanian / Flickr Creative Commons

The subjects of science, technology, engineering, and math are all the rage these days among politicians, business and education leaders who say we need more emphasis on these subjects to compete globally. But others say we’re going overboard on STEM and that society benefits from a broader approach that includes the arts, communication, and critical thinking.