Brady Carlson, NHPR

It’s summer camp season – these days kids can spend a week on almost any activity they like, from sports and the outdoors to computers and robotics. Since the late 1960’s, kids who love music have been heading to Bennington, Vermont, which is home to a piano camp known as Summer Sonatina.

Flikr Creative Commons / Mike Willis

Governor John Lynch has vetoed a bill that would create a tax credit for businesses donating to not-for-profit scholarship organizations.

Most American troops have left Iraq, and many have left Afghanistan. Now more than half a million of them have left the service — and they're going to college. Some vets say the transition is like landing on another planet, but they aren't the only ones struggling: The college staffs are, too.

Flikr Creative Commons / Dean Terry


At the beginning of this school year, Spaulding High School in Rochester took a big step. They put in a new grading system, got rid of final exams, and reworked how they thought about giving grades in general. The change at Spaulding is part of a bigger change happening all over the Granite State.

kcadams via Flickr/Creative Commons

Recruitment from other countries is a rising trend in Higher Education as a way to diversify campuses and bring in money to financially strapped institutions.  It’s also become a big business, raising questions about the way in which students are brought in.  We take a look at this practice and how it’s evolving here in the Granite State.


Sara Plourde / NHPR

Enacting any constitutional amendment is tough. It requires a three-fifths vote by both House and Senate, and two-thirds support from voters at the polls.  Add to this the fact this amendment deals with school funding and that lawmakers have killed 80-odd  Claremont-inspired amendments over the past 14 years, and the guardedness of even the boldest of lawmakers is understandable.

<a href="">Elizabeth Albert</a> / Flickr

Legislative leaders and the governor have reached a deal on language for an education funding constitutional amendment.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

A group of parents in Manchester are calling for the state to provide more money for their school district.  The newly formed Citizens for Manchester Schools held a rally in downtown Manchester  Tuesday night. 

The organization’s president, Jim O’Connell says the city’s schools are underfunded. He says the money needed to fund an adequate education is relatively small.

As part of our year-long series on New Hampshire's Immigration Story, we've looked at what it's like for a refugee to arrive in New Hampshire, speaking a different language, and having to learn new customs.

For young refugees who enroll in New Hampshire schools, the challenges can be even greater - and the same goes for teachers working with them.

Sen. John Gallus, a Republican from Berlin, has joined only four North Country members of the House in supporting a bill that would give a business a tax credit when it donates to a parochial or private school.

As NHPR’s Dan Gorenstein reported the Senate Wednesday passed House Bill 1607.

Advocates of the bill say it gives less wealthy families more choices in where they wish to send their children.

As schools continue to mainstream children with disabilities, students with emotional and behavioral disabilities  may be the toughest to include.  They’re less likely to graduate and more likely to get arrested.  And there are questions about how to approach these kids – whether it’s a matter of more discipline or alternative methods.  We look at this issue and discuss a new documentary that takes a look at the topic through the life of a high school student coping with these disabilities.  


Christiana Care / Flickr/Creative Commons

The long projected shortage of nurses in the state has been temporarily resolved in recent years. Hospitals that used to be beggars have become choosers, by seeking to hire more nurses with bachelor degrees or even master’s degrees. While many in the field are eager to adapt and pursue higher education, others fear academic achievement is being favored over years of experience.  We look at this development and the broad challenges facing the field of nursing.


Photo by Rev. Bombasticos via Flickr Creative Commons

In 1999, the Columbine massacre dramatically shifted how American schools approach student discipline. Zero-tolerance policies became the norm. Rates of suspensions have doubled, with minority-students seeing the most dramatic rise.

Studies show that only 5% of those suspended are for weapons or drugs. It’s behavior that gets the vast majority of these kids sent home. But a high school in Walla Walla, WA realized that home is not giving these kids what they need.

photo by Tulane Public Relations via Flickr

By some estimates, U.S. college debt has hit a staggering one trillion dollars.  And New Hampshire students are first in the nation when it comes to the average debt burden. Some blame colleges and universities for hiking tuition. Others blame states for steep funding cuts.  Meanwhile, many say our entire higher education system needs a serious financial overhaul.



(photo: Sheryl Rich-Kern)

Rivier College in Nashua may be getting a makeover.

Pigeonpie via Flickr Creative Commons

Student loan debt as a campaign issue: this week, President Obama visited college students in Colorado, North Carolina and Iowa and made urgent appeals to keep interest rates low for current and future college students.  The house will vote Friday (4/27/12) on legislation that could keep the interest rate on government-subsidized undergraduate student loans from doubling in July.

Last year when Andrew Ng, a computer science professor at Stanford University, put his machine-learning class online and opened enrollment to the world, more than 100,000 students signed up.

"I think all of us were surprised," he says.

Ng had posted lectures online before, but this class was different.

"This was actually a class where you can participate as a student and get homework and assessments," he said.

Politicians and pundits frequently proclaim that they know what drives innovation and economic development. Despite their assurances, the chicken-and-egg question of whether quality education creates thriving economies or flourishing economies create good schools has been cycling around for years. For clues, Jordan Weissman, Associate Editor at the Atlantic, looked not to India’s booming IT industry or China’s cadre of engineers, but to Germany, circa 1386, when a papal schism opened up new opportunities for innovation.

Since mid-February, the University of Pittsburgh has received more than 50 bomb threats, and while they've all been false alarms, they have succeeded in disrupting campus life. Tighter security measures are now in place, but the threats continue, and students are wondering how they'll be able to make up class work and prepare for final exams.

As Portugal tries to dig out of its financial mess, it's confronted with a sobering fact: Fewer than 30 percent of adult Portuguese have graduated from high school. Not college. High school.

And in a country that's been hit so hard by the economic crisis, even those with an education are struggling.

Ana Dias and Ruth Cardozo, both 27, are lifelong friends who now work together at a shoe store in Lisbon, the Portuguese capital. Cardozo dropped out of high school 10 years ago to take this job.

The American Presidency remains the most powerful office in the world…and one that any American-born child can aspire to. One of our listeners recently shared an interesting item on our Facebook page…an essay her daughter wrote for her third grade class at the Rumford School in Concord, New Hampshire. The subject: “If I were president, I would...”

We're pretty sure that Emma's answer betrays a realpolitik far beyond her nine years of age.


Hundreds of thousands of veterans have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan in recent years, eager to get an education under the new post-Sept. 11 GI Bill.

Many vets looking for a school find they are inundated by sales pitches from institutions hungry for their government benefits. Now, lawmakers are looking for ways to protect vets without narrowing their education choices.

The Obama administration is calling for major changes in Head Start, the 46-year-old early childhood education program that helped launch President Johnson's War on Poverty.

President Obama says too many children today aren't learning, and too many education programs are mismanaged.

"We're not just going to put money into programs that don't work," the president announced late last year. "We will take money and put it into programs that do."

(Photo by Runs with Scissors via Flickr Creative Commons)

The average college graduate today will walk away tens of thousands in debt, fewer job opportunities and lower relative wages than previous generations.  While some students increase their post-college chances by majoring in trending fields like science and engineering – others follow less practical paths in the study of  philosophy, religion…and cartooning.  Yup, cartooning.  

Fast Company’s annual list of the world’s 50 Most Innovative Companies included many of the usual suspects: Apple, Facebook and Google all made the list.

The Upper Valley Business & Education Partnership makes connections between schools and their wider communities. Tyler Mansfield and Jim Madden met through the Partnership’s “Everybody Wins!” reading mentoring program.

JIM: I’ve always loved to read so it was really just sort of a natural fit to share my love of reading with the students. I guess we both discovered we kind of liked mysteries.

Most people agree that good teachers help students succeed.
But how do good teachers learn to be effective?

One D.C.-based, private nonprofit is asking just that. They want colleges to participate in a study that ranks teacher preparation programs.

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Officials at Dartmouth College say they’re taking new steps to deal with hazing on campus, especially in fraternities. That issue turned into a campus-wide controversy earlier this year, after Dartmouth senior Andrew Lohse published a piece in the student newspaper describing what he called “dehumanizing” hazing rituals in his fraternity, Sigma Alpha Epsilon.


The New Hampshire Senate passed a bill sponsored by school choice advocates that would create a tax credit for businesses that donate to scholarship organizations.

Many public school educators oppose the measure saying that it would sap schools of already scarce resources, but opponents in the senate tried to block the bill by calling into question its constitutionality.