Elections

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

There’s an aldermen race going on next week in Manchester. And one of the candidates on the ballot would be the city’s youngest elected if he wins.

He turned 20 Thursday, attends UNH Manchester, and is a refugee from Kuwait.

But first he’ll have to clear Tuesday’s primary before he can even make it onto November’s ballot.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

After three hours of arguments inside a Hillsborough County courtroom in Nashua on Monday afternoon, the fate of the state's controversial new voting law is still up in the air heading into a Laconia legislative special election on Tuesday.

Allegra Boverman/NHPR

Senate Bill 3, the controversial new bill that changes some of the requirements for newly registered voters, gets its first test Tuesday in a special election in Laconia and Belmont. Gov. Chris Sununu says it will protect the integrity of New Hampshire elections.  State Democratic Party Chairman Ray Buckley says it’s voter suppression.

Here are some basic questions on the new law that is being challenged in court.

What is it?

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Deputy Secretary of State Dave Scanlan says the office is reevaluating its guidance to cities and towns after “handwritten confidential, non-public information” was found in the public voter checklists of more than 40 New Hampshire communities.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State Senate candidates David Boutin, Republican and former state Senator, Kevin Cavanaugh, Democrat and Manchester alderman, and Jason Dubrow, a Libertarian active in town government in Dunbarton, joined The Exchange to discuss issues important to New Hampshire voters. Voting takes place on July 25. 

Tracy Lee Carroll; NHPR

We're talking with the three candidates who want to be the next state senator from District 16. The issues they're talking about impact all of the Granite State, including public education, child protection, taxes, and workforce development. 


Gov. Chris Sununu says turning over the state’s voter information (or, at least, what’s included in public voter checklists) to a Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity is a step toward restoring confidence in the nation’s elections.

Becoming Savvy About Fake News

Mar 21, 2017
Pexels

The wave of fake news that flooded Facebook and other social media during last year's election campaign was a wake-up call for many.  But fake news  has actually been around for a long time. Seventy-five years ago, regional newspapers in the South falsely reported that first lady Eleanor Roosevelt  was quietly organizing  black women into secret "Eleanor Clubs," with the motto: "A white woman in the kitchen by 1943."    In the digital era, that kind of rumor can spread far and worldwide, in no time. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

There’s plenty of debate in New Hampshire right now around the question of who should be allowed to vote here. A big part of that lies in figuring out when — and why — a person calls New Hampshire their home. Answering that question, however, isn’t always straightforward.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  The late winter blizzard led town officials across in New Hampshire to postpone town meetings and elections. It's a decision many people -- but not all -- are happy about.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Secretary of State Bill Gardner says he would not support legislation if he believed it would hurt voter turnout. And as he sees it, a new bill that would impose new requirements on voters who register within 30 days of an election does not run the risk of doing that.

UNH Survey Center

Republicans pleased with the 2016 election results are pushing consumer confidence in New Hampshire to a 15-year high.

Bi-partisan frustration rises in the Granite State over President Trumps unsubstantiated charges of New Hampshire voter fraud.  The New Hampshire House votes to kill a Right-to-Work bill, which would have impacted how unions collect fees. The policy has been a priority for Republicans, who control the House, Senate and Governor’s Office for the first time in more than a decade.  And the Executive Council confirms the Governor's choice for Education Commissioner, Frank Edelblut. 


justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s shaping up to be a busy week for anyone following potential changes to the state’s election laws. At least 17 such bills are on deck for public hearings before House and Senate committees — a majority of which seek to restrict existing rules around voting.

The Electoral College: Yea or Nay?

Nov 18, 2016
NHPR

Although rare, the winner of the Oval Office can lose the national popular vote, as we saw this year.  And that's caused many Americans to ask: Does my vote count?  The answer is complicated, and changing the system would be tough. Still, there's no shortage of ideas.  


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The way Secretary of State Bill Gardner sees it, Granite State elections have gone on under dire circumstances before. This year, he thinks New Hampshire will be able to handle whatever’s in store this year on Election Day.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate Monday night. The NPR Politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is following along and will be annotating and fact-checking in real time.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

As New Hampshire residents head to the polls Tuesday, a federal appeals court in Concord will begin hearing arguments on whether voters should be allowed to display so-called “ballot selfies.”

Post-Labor Day Presidential Campaign Kick-off

Sep 8, 2016
angela n. / flickr/cc

Labor Day signals the end of Summer, but during a presidential election, it also serves as the kickoff for the fall general election campaign.  Both Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican standard-bearer Donald Trump hit the ground running this week with multiple campaign events, including back-to-back presidential forums.  Meanwhile, third party challengers are looking to win over the large number of voters who appear unhappy with both major party nominees.  

Our guest host for this program is Dean Spiliotes, Civic Scholar in the School of Arts and Science at Southern New Hampshire University and author of NHPoliticalCapital.com.


Sara Plourde / NHPR

With every census, states have the chance to re-draw political boundaries based on population changes.  Usually, the legislature controls the process, giving the party in power much greater influence. We're examining how this has affected New Hampshire's voting districts, the balance of power at the Statehouse, and other approaches taken elsewhere.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We'll look at the results from the many states that voted yesterday - from Alaska to Massachusetts - and how it all affects the presidential nomination process that began just a month ago in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Allegra Boverman / Flickr/CC

It's been quiet in the Granite State now that the candidates have moved on, but elsewhere the race has only grown more heated. This weekend we're seeing this play out in South Carolina and Nevada, where minority and military voters play a bigger role.  We'll discuss the weekend's results and what they might mean for future contests.

New Hampshire Primary 2016: Recapping the Results

Feb 10, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Last night, the Granite State gave solid victories to Democrat Bernie Sanders and Republican Donald Trump, with John Kasich grabbing a coveted second place the GOP side.  We'll review the results, and what might be next as the candidates pack up their Granite State gear and head to contests elsewhere in the country.

woodfin / Flickr/CC

The New Hampshire presidential primary celebrates its 100th birthday next year, and a new book chronicles those many decades, including lots of primary lore. It also examines whether the first primary really has as much power over the nomination process as many believe it to.

  This program was originally broadcast on 9/3/15.

GUESTS:

NHPR

It’s become a common theme: voters are anxious – about national security, income inequality, and a government they see as unable to confront the country’s problems. Campaigns have tapped into these sentiments, often striking an angry tone. We’ll explore the extent of this discontent – and whether it's exceptional to this campaign season.

GUESTS:

Manchester Man Pleads Guilty In Voter Fraud Case

Jan 18, 2016
justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

A Manchester man has pleaded guilty to voter fraud.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

A Manchester man has turned himself in to police after a warrant was issued accusing him of giving false addresses and voting in two other towns on Election Day in November 2014. The attorney general's office says Derek Castonguay registered to vote in Salem last year while living in Manchester.

Tracking Presidential Candidates on Social Media

Oct 22, 2015
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're looking at the proliferation of political speech in this tumultuous presidential season, and its impact on voters.  We’ll examine how campaigns and voters are navigating this brave new world of media, including the vast and sometimes viral dimension of social media -- and explore its implications for our democracy.

GUESTS:

•  Lara Brown  - Graduate School of Political Management’s Political Management Program Director and an associate professor at George Washington University
 

Ash Carter / Flickr / Creative Commons

We check in with Political Junkie Ken Rudin about some of the top stories in politics this month: After a caustic debate pitting Rand Paul against his fellow Senate Republicans, key provisions of the Patriot Act expire. On the primary front, Democrat Martin O’Malley and Republican Lindsey Graham declare their candidacies. And, as ISIS advances in Iraq Presidential hopefuls re-hash the Iraq war debate.

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