Elections

NHPR / Flickr/CC

Although top races got the attention in this year’s mid-term elections, voters in a majority of states also had a slate of ballot measures to consider. We’ll look at what some of the big topics were, from marijuana laws to the minimum wage, and how the results fit into the overall narrative for this year’s election. First, though, we'll look at a law in New Hampshire that prohibits 'ballot selfies.'

GUESTS:

North Country Incumbents Hold Their Own

Nov 5, 2014
Chris Jensen for NHPR

In the North County incumbents  kept their offices, according to unofficial results from the Associated Press.

Sen. Jeff Woodburn, a Democrat from Dalton was re-elected, beating challenger Mark Evans, a Republican from Berlin. Woodburn had 9,056 votes to Evans’ 5,741 with 80 percent of the precincts reporting.

In the race for Executive Council incumbent Republican Joseph Kenney was re-elected with 42,838 votes over Democrat Michael Cryans with 41,297 and 84 percent of the precincts reporting.

In other races:

nshepherd via flickr Creative Commons

When an unrecognizable number shows up on your phone during election season, chances are pretty good that the caller is someone taking a poll. On today’s show, turning the tables on pollsters. We’ll find out how they view polling accuracy and ethics for Election 2012.

Also today, the aging bunnies –  a group of Playboy centerfold models now in their 60s and 70s, reject the idea that they victimized, and remember a more tasteful time for the men’s magazine.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

GOP Chairman, Other Top Republicans, Visit N.H.

Sep 5, 2014
Associated Press

The chairman of the Republican National Committee made a campaign stop in Nashua Friday. Chairman Reince Priebus was the first in a series of national GOP leaders who will visit the state ahead of next Tuesday’s primary.

In a cramped GOP office, Priebus rubbed elbows and talked up the role New Hampshire could play for his party come November.

"It’s a pivotal state in determining whether we can win the U.S. Senate and fire Harry Reid," says Priebus. "We need to win here in the midterm and pave the way for the future."

Midterm Elections With 'Political Junkie' Ken Rudin

Sep 4, 2014
Allegra Boverman

Ken Rudin is in New Hampshire, putting his seasoned eye on politics.  And this year, with Republicans hoping to take the U.S. Senate and congressional dysfunction weighing heavily on voters, we’ll explore the themes emerging in the 2014 midterm elections, both here and around the country.

GUEST:

Emily Corwin for NHPR

Top Democrats rallied volunteers and worked the phones Monday in Portsmouth. Their goal was to call attention to the US Supreme Court’s “Hobby Lobby” ruling, which found a closely held company could not be forced to pay for all birth control procedures required by the Affordable Care Act.

Democrats hope Supreme Court rulings like the Hobby Lobby and the striking down of Massachusetts’s abortion clinic buffer zone law will motivate women voters, helping the party overcome certain challenges.

2014 Primaries and Elections: A Look Ahead

Jul 9, 2014
meagan_taylor / Flickr/CC

With summer officially here, it’s not just the weather heating up, but the political season as well. There are polls, ads, debates being scheduled, and big-name politicians coming in to support candidates. There's also already some drama, with one contender dropping out and another’s residency being questioned.  We’re looking at how the U.S. Congress, Senate, and N.H. Governor races are shaping up so far.

GUESTS:

N.H. Viewpoints On SCOTUS Campaign Finance Decision

Apr 8, 2014
Sandra Mars / Flickr/CC

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court came down on a decision that will change the way we fund elections.  In a 5-4 vote, the court removed a cap on how many candidates or committees a person can support per election cycle.  Although the amount is still restricted to $2600 per candidate, an individual can now gift that amount to as many politicians as he or she wants. Opponents of the ruling worry the decision may suppress ordinary voices: “where enough money calls the tune,” said Justice William Breyer, “the general public will not be heard.” But supporters like Chief Justice Roberts say that this case follows first amendment rights. “Integration and access are not corruption,” said Roberts, “they embody a central feature of democracy that constituents support candidates who share their beliefs and interests.

GUESTS:

CALLOUT:

  • John Greabe - director of the Rudman Center at UNH Law School. He teaches constitutional law, civil procedure, federal courts and jurisdiction.

NPR's Mara Liasson

Mar 17, 2014
Stephen Voss / NPR

Mara Liasson will discuss the White House and upcoming elections, as well as how changes in both political parties over the past six years have affected such key issues as the Affordable Care Act, the debt-ceiling debate, and immigration reform.

GUESTS:

  • Mara Liasson – national political correspondent for NPR. She joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter, later working as a congressional correspondent, and then the White House correspondent.

LINKS:

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Conservative activist Andrew Hemingway is the first Republican to enter the race for governor.

The 31-year-old high-tech entrepreneur announced his candidacy in front of a group of supporters in Manchester Thursday night.

“I have the courage and innovative ideas to take on this state’s biggest challenges and to solve them. I ask for your support in this effort. I need your help.”

He seeks to unseat Governor Maggie Hassan as she pursues a second, two-year term.

Hemingway is the former chairman of the Republican Liberty Caucus of New Hampshire.

The editor and president of The Laconia Daily Sun has been elected mayor of the city.

Ed Engler said he will be speaking to voters around the city in preparation for the job, which starts in January.

He defeated Kailief Mitchell, an academic assistant at the Spaudling Youth Center, by a vote of 1,155 to 403 in Tuesday's election.

Engler said economic development would be a priority, starting with how to apply funds accrued by the downtown tax increment financing.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas and challenger Alderman Patrick Arnold will off face in their first debate Wednesday morning.

dimmerswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

Congressional approval rating hit a new now of 10.5 percent this week. If you’ve found yourself yelling at the radio and TV news coverage of the government shutdown and plotting revenge at the next election, you may not have to wait until 2014.

Last month, two of Colorado’s Democratic state senators became targets of a successful recall after voting for more restrictive gun legislation, adding to the increasing number of recall campaigns launched over the past two years. 

Seth Masket is a political scientist at the University of Denver, and a regular contributor to Pacific Standard.  He spoke with us about his article “The Recall is the New Normal”. 

A Vice President seems like an obvious choice at the end of any President’s second term, but President Obama’s right-hand man may face an “over-the-hill” battle for the nomination. Steve Kornacki writes about why Joe Biden so frequently gets left off of the presidential short list.


We look at what our nation’s most important document, the Constitution, says and doesn’t say about elections. There’s some debate over who should write the rules, the federal or state governments, also who exactly can cast a ballot and if voting is a right or a privilege.  We’ll talk with those involved in new civics program called “Constitutionally speaking”. 

Guests

TBA

After last night President Obama and Governor Romney have squared off three times along with one event starring the VP candidates.  Lots of issues have been covered from the economy to foreign policy and many times the tone was contentious.  We’ll look at who won these debates…who may have received a 'bump' from them and how we’ll continue to hear the themes that were raised up until election day. 

Guests

Fact-Checking the Debates

Oct 23, 2012

NHPR will have live NPR coverage of the vice presidential debate held this evening at Centre College in Danville, Ky. GOP Rep. Paul Ryan will challenge Vice President Joe Biden in a 90-minute debate on foreign and domestic issues. Coverage of the debate will begin at 9 p.m., following a special at 8 p.m. from WNYC Radio’s “Swing State Radio Network.”

President Obama and his Republican challenger, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, engaged Thursday night in a sometimes spirited, but always cordial, debate that got very technical at times.

It was the "corporate executive" (Romney) vs. the "government professor" (Obama) and the GOP nominee appeared to be "full of confidence and full of sales pitch," NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving says, while Obama put pressure on the Republican to explain what he would do as president.

NHPR  will air special coverage for all the presidential debates and the vice presidential debate on October 3, 11, 16 and 22.  In addition, WNYC Radio's "Swing State Radio Network"  in New York is providing a special one-hour live call-in show that will air from 8 - 9 p.m. before each debate specifically for the swing states. 

Oct. 3: First presidential debate on domestic policy

(Note, if you're easily offended by juvenile humor, this post and video might not be for you.)

The video's been going around since Friday, but it's too funny not to pass along just because it's a few days old. And we bet many folks missed it over the weekend.

President Obama and Mitt Romney Visit N.H. Friday

Sep 5, 2012

New Hampshire voters can check out both President Barack Obama and his Republican rival Mitt Romney on the same day later this week.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/newshour/7909240290/">Newshour</a> / flickr

NHPR will have special NPR live coverage of the Democratic National Convention being held in Charlotte, NC Sept. 4 - 6, each evening between 8 - 11 pm.

Listen to the radio, or stream on the NHPR iPhone app and by clicking the Listen Live button at the top of the page to hear this coverage. Find more information about the DNC coverage on npr.org.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The AFL-CIO of New Hampshire held its annual Labor Day breakfast at St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Manchester this morning.  More than three hundred working men and women gathered to hear from Governor Lynch, Employment Security commissioner George Copadis, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, and others. 

The event’s featured guest and keynote speaker was AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, who says she came to New Hampshire not just to recognize New Hampshire’s workers, but to encourage them to get involved in the upcoming presidential and local elections.

Tune-in to New Hampshire Public Radio and check back online tonight as we continue to broadcast live NPR coverage from the Republican National Convention in Tampa. Join us from 8 - 11 pm.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Speaking at an outdoor rally that drew close to 3000 people, Mitt Romney said the first victim of an Obama campaign has been the truth. The former Massachusetts governor added that he has made a promise not to increase taxes, and that he will stick to it.

Josh Rogers, NHPR

Speaking in the sweltering gymnasium of Windham High School, Mr. Obama told a crowd of 2300 that the policies of Mitt Romney and Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan would benefit the rich and hurt the middle class. Mr. Obama argued that under the budget supported by Ryan, Romney would pay less than 1 percent of his income in taxes. The President also said Romney’s plans would raise taxes on middle class families by $2000 a year.   

From now until November, President Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney will emphasize their differences. But the two men's lives actually coincide in a striking number of ways. In this installment of NPR's "Parallel Lives" series, a look at Obama's time at their shared alma mater.

Harvard professor Laurence Tribe is a sort of legal rock star, particularly among liberals. First-year law students he has never met don't just show up at his door saying, "I want to work for you." At least they didn't until March 31, 1989.

Now that he's all but certain to be the Republican challenging President Obama in November, Mitt Romney has begun to expand his operations. In the past week, he's named a top aide to head his vice presidential selection team, and his paid staff is expected to soon quadruple in size.

With the president's campaign well-staffed and spread across the map, it's become a game of catch-up for Romney.

There are Republican primary contests in five important states next Tuesday, but with Rick Santorum's departure from the race, they've gotten little attention.

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