Elections

Post-Labor Day Presidential Campaign Kick-off

Sep 8, 2016
angela n. / flickr/cc

Labor Day signals the end of Summer, but during a presidential election, it also serves as the kickoff for the fall general election campaign.  Both Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican standard-bearer Donald Trump hit the ground running this week with multiple campaign events, including back-to-back presidential forums.  Meanwhile, third party challengers are looking to win over the large number of voters who appear unhappy with both major party nominees.  

Our guest host for this program is Dean Spiliotes, Civic Scholar in the School of Arts and Science at Southern New Hampshire University and author of NHPoliticalCapital.com.


Sara Plourde / NHPR

With every census, states have the chance to re-draw political boundaries based on population changes.  Usually, the legislature controls the process, giving the party in power much greater influence. We're examining how this has affected New Hampshire's voting districts, the balance of power at the Statehouse, and other approaches taken elsewhere.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We'll look at the results from the many states that voted yesterday - from Alaska to Massachusetts - and how it all affects the presidential nomination process that began just a month ago in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Allegra Boverman / Flickr/CC

It's been quiet in the Granite State now that the candidates have moved on, but elsewhere the race has only grown more heated. This weekend we're seeing this play out in South Carolina and Nevada, where minority and military voters play a bigger role.  We'll discuss the weekend's results and what they might mean for future contests.

New Hampshire Primary 2016: Recapping the Results

Feb 10, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Last night, the Granite State gave solid victories to Democrat Bernie Sanders and Republican Donald Trump, with John Kasich grabbing a coveted second place the GOP side.  We'll review the results, and what might be next as the candidates pack up their Granite State gear and head to contests elsewhere in the country.

woodfin / Flickr/CC

The New Hampshire presidential primary celebrates its 100th birthday next year, and a new book chronicles those many decades, including lots of primary lore. It also examines whether the first primary really has as much power over the nomination process as many believe it to.

  This program was originally broadcast on 9/3/15.

GUESTS:

NHPR

It’s become a common theme: voters are anxious – about national security, income inequality, and a government they see as unable to confront the country’s problems. Campaigns have tapped into these sentiments, often striking an angry tone. We’ll explore the extent of this discontent – and whether it's exceptional to this campaign season.

GUESTS:

Manchester Man Pleads Guilty In Voter Fraud Case

Jan 18, 2016
justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

A Manchester man has pleaded guilty to voter fraud.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

A Manchester man has turned himself in to police after a warrant was issued accusing him of giving false addresses and voting in two other towns on Election Day in November 2014. The attorney general's office says Derek Castonguay registered to vote in Salem last year while living in Manchester.

Tracking Presidential Candidates on Social Media

Oct 22, 2015
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're looking at the proliferation of political speech in this tumultuous presidential season, and its impact on voters.  We’ll examine how campaigns and voters are navigating this brave new world of media, including the vast and sometimes viral dimension of social media -- and explore its implications for our democracy.

GUESTS:

•  Lara Brown  - Graduate School of Political Management’s Political Management Program Director and an associate professor at George Washington University
 

Ash Carter / Flickr / Creative Commons

We check in with Political Junkie Ken Rudin about some of the top stories in politics this month: After a caustic debate pitting Rand Paul against his fellow Senate Republicans, key provisions of the Patriot Act expire. On the primary front, Democrat Martin O’Malley and Republican Lindsey Graham declare their candidacies. And, as ISIS advances in Iraq Presidential hopefuls re-hash the Iraq war debate.

Hampstead, Kingston Voters Choose State Rep. Tuesday

Apr 27, 2015
voting booths
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A special House election this week in Hampstead and Kingston echoes the statewide debate over New Hampshire’s next two-year budget.

Rethinking Redistricting

Feb 23, 2015
Andy Proehl / Flickr/CC

The U.S. census every ten years redistributes Congressional seats based on population changes.  While it may seem inevitable that this process would favor whichever party is in power, redistricting has been used over the years to stack the political deck. Some say this is harming the democratic process and that reform is in order.

GUEST:

AP Photo

  Potential Republican candidate for president, John Bolton is visiting New Hampshire today. He is scheduled to speak during a Politics and Eggs event hosted by The New England Council and The New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College.

The visit by the former U.N. Ambassador was originally scheduled for late January but was postponed due to snowy weather.

Other potential candidates are expected to arrive in the Granite State next week including Florida Senator Marco Rubio and former Maryland Governor Bob Ehrlich.

Elections 2014 Wrap-Up: Voter Turnout

Nov 20, 2014
ela-mathilda / Flickr/CC

Nationally, only thirty six percent of Americans eligible to vote did so in the recent elections.  Not since the start of World War Two has turnout been so low. Here in New Hampshire, results were much stronger, but, still, many eligible voters did not participate. We’ll explore what’s behind this seeming voter malaise.

GUESTS:

NHPR / Flickr/CC

Although top races got the attention in this year’s mid-term elections, voters in a majority of states also had a slate of ballot measures to consider. We’ll look at what some of the big topics were, from marijuana laws to the minimum wage, and how the results fit into the overall narrative for this year’s election. First, though, we'll look at a law in New Hampshire that prohibits 'ballot selfies.'

GUESTS:

North Country Incumbents Hold Their Own

Nov 5, 2014
Chris Jensen for NHPR

In the North County incumbents  kept their offices, according to unofficial results from the Associated Press.

Sen. Jeff Woodburn, a Democrat from Dalton was re-elected, beating challenger Mark Evans, a Republican from Berlin. Woodburn had 9,056 votes to Evans’ 5,741 with 80 percent of the precincts reporting.

In the race for Executive Council incumbent Republican Joseph Kenney was re-elected with 42,838 votes over Democrat Michael Cryans with 41,297 and 84 percent of the precincts reporting.

In other races:

nshepherd via flickr Creative Commons

When an unrecognizable number shows up on your phone during election season, chances are pretty good that the caller is someone taking a poll. On today’s show, turning the tables on pollsters. We’ll find out how they view polling accuracy and ethics for Election 2012.

Also today, the aging bunnies –  a group of Playboy centerfold models now in their 60s and 70s, reject the idea that they victimized, and remember a more tasteful time for the men’s magazine.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

GOP Chairman, Other Top Republicans, Visit N.H.

Sep 5, 2014
Associated Press

The chairman of the Republican National Committee made a campaign stop in Nashua Friday. Chairman Reince Priebus was the first in a series of national GOP leaders who will visit the state ahead of next Tuesday’s primary.

In a cramped GOP office, Priebus rubbed elbows and talked up the role New Hampshire could play for his party come November.

"It’s a pivotal state in determining whether we can win the U.S. Senate and fire Harry Reid," says Priebus. "We need to win here in the midterm and pave the way for the future."

Midterm Elections With 'Political Junkie' Ken Rudin

Sep 4, 2014
Allegra Boverman

Ken Rudin is in New Hampshire, putting his seasoned eye on politics.  And this year, with Republicans hoping to take the U.S. Senate and congressional dysfunction weighing heavily on voters, we’ll explore the themes emerging in the 2014 midterm elections, both here and around the country.

GUEST:

Emily Corwin for NHPR

Top Democrats rallied volunteers and worked the phones Monday in Portsmouth. Their goal was to call attention to the US Supreme Court’s “Hobby Lobby” ruling, which found a closely held company could not be forced to pay for all birth control procedures required by the Affordable Care Act.

Democrats hope Supreme Court rulings like the Hobby Lobby and the striking down of Massachusetts’s abortion clinic buffer zone law will motivate women voters, helping the party overcome certain challenges.

2014 Primaries and Elections: A Look Ahead

Jul 9, 2014
meagan_taylor / Flickr/CC

With summer officially here, it’s not just the weather heating up, but the political season as well. There are polls, ads, debates being scheduled, and big-name politicians coming in to support candidates. There's also already some drama, with one contender dropping out and another’s residency being questioned.  We’re looking at how the U.S. Congress, Senate, and N.H. Governor races are shaping up so far.

GUESTS:

N.H. Viewpoints On SCOTUS Campaign Finance Decision

Apr 8, 2014
Sandra Mars / Flickr/CC

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court came down on a decision that will change the way we fund elections.  In a 5-4 vote, the court removed a cap on how many candidates or committees a person can support per election cycle.  Although the amount is still restricted to $2600 per candidate, an individual can now gift that amount to as many politicians as he or she wants. Opponents of the ruling worry the decision may suppress ordinary voices: “where enough money calls the tune,” said Justice William Breyer, “the general public will not be heard.” But supporters like Chief Justice Roberts say that this case follows first amendment rights. “Integration and access are not corruption,” said Roberts, “they embody a central feature of democracy that constituents support candidates who share their beliefs and interests.

GUESTS:

CALLOUT:

  • John Greabe - director of the Rudman Center at UNH Law School. He teaches constitutional law, civil procedure, federal courts and jurisdiction.

NPR's Mara Liasson

Mar 17, 2014
Stephen Voss / NPR

Mara Liasson will discuss the White House and upcoming elections, as well as how changes in both political parties over the past six years have affected such key issues as the Affordable Care Act, the debt-ceiling debate, and immigration reform.

GUESTS:

  • Mara Liasson – national political correspondent for NPR. She joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter, later working as a congressional correspondent, and then the White House correspondent.

LINKS:

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Conservative activist Andrew Hemingway is the first Republican to enter the race for governor.

The 31-year-old high-tech entrepreneur announced his candidacy in front of a group of supporters in Manchester Thursday night.

“I have the courage and innovative ideas to take on this state’s biggest challenges and to solve them. I ask for your support in this effort. I need your help.”

He seeks to unseat Governor Maggie Hassan as she pursues a second, two-year term.

Hemingway is the former chairman of the Republican Liberty Caucus of New Hampshire.

The editor and president of The Laconia Daily Sun has been elected mayor of the city.

Ed Engler said he will be speaking to voters around the city in preparation for the job, which starts in January.

He defeated Kailief Mitchell, an academic assistant at the Spaudling Youth Center, by a vote of 1,155 to 403 in Tuesday's election.

Engler said economic development would be a priority, starting with how to apply funds accrued by the downtown tax increment financing.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas and challenger Alderman Patrick Arnold will off face in their first debate Wednesday morning.

dimmerswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

Congressional approval rating hit a new now of 10.5 percent this week. If you’ve found yourself yelling at the radio and TV news coverage of the government shutdown and plotting revenge at the next election, you may not have to wait until 2014.

Last month, two of Colorado’s Democratic state senators became targets of a successful recall after voting for more restrictive gun legislation, adding to the increasing number of recall campaigns launched over the past two years. 

Seth Masket is a political scientist at the University of Denver, and a regular contributor to Pacific Standard.  He spoke with us about his article “The Recall is the New Normal”. 

A Vice President seems like an obvious choice at the end of any President’s second term, but President Obama’s right-hand man may face an “over-the-hill” battle for the nomination. Steve Kornacki writes about why Joe Biden so frequently gets left off of the presidential short list.


We look at what our nation’s most important document, the Constitution, says and doesn’t say about elections. There’s some debate over who should write the rules, the federal or state governments, also who exactly can cast a ballot and if voting is a right or a privilege.  We’ll talk with those involved in new civics program called “Constitutionally speaking”. 

Guests

TBA

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