Elections

A Vice President seems like an obvious choice at the end of any President’s second term, but President Obama’s right-hand man may face an “over-the-hill” battle for the nomination. Steve Kornacki writes about why Joe Biden so frequently gets left off of the presidential short list.


We look at what our nation’s most important document, the Constitution, says and doesn’t say about elections. There’s some debate over who should write the rules, the federal or state governments, also who exactly can cast a ballot and if voting is a right or a privilege.  We’ll talk with those involved in new civics program called “Constitutionally speaking”. 

Guests

TBA

After last night President Obama and Governor Romney have squared off three times along with one event starring the VP candidates.  Lots of issues have been covered from the economy to foreign policy and many times the tone was contentious.  We’ll look at who won these debates…who may have received a 'bump' from them and how we’ll continue to hear the themes that were raised up until election day. 

Guests

Fact-Checking the Debates

Oct 23, 2012

NHPR will have live NPR coverage of the vice presidential debate held this evening at Centre College in Danville, Ky. GOP Rep. Paul Ryan will challenge Vice President Joe Biden in a 90-minute debate on foreign and domestic issues. Coverage of the debate will begin at 9 p.m., following a special at 8 p.m. from WNYC Radio’s “Swing State Radio Network.”

President Obama and his Republican challenger, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, engaged Thursday night in a sometimes spirited, but always cordial, debate that got very technical at times.

It was the "corporate executive" (Romney) vs. the "government professor" (Obama) and the GOP nominee appeared to be "full of confidence and full of sales pitch," NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving says, while Obama put pressure on the Republican to explain what he would do as president.

NHPR  will air special coverage for all the presidential debates and the vice presidential debate on October 3, 11, 16 and 22.  In addition, WNYC Radio's "Swing State Radio Network"  in New York is providing a special one-hour live call-in show that will air from 8 - 9 p.m. before each debate specifically for the swing states. 

Oct. 3: First presidential debate on domestic policy

(Note, if you're easily offended by juvenile humor, this post and video might not be for you.)

The video's been going around since Friday, but it's too funny not to pass along just because it's a few days old. And we bet many folks missed it over the weekend.

President Obama and Mitt Romney Visit N.H. Friday

Sep 5, 2012

New Hampshire voters can check out both President Barack Obama and his Republican rival Mitt Romney on the same day later this week.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/newshour/7909240290/">Newshour</a> / flickr

NHPR will have special NPR live coverage of the Democratic National Convention being held in Charlotte, NC Sept. 4 - 6, each evening between 8 - 11 pm.

Listen to the radio, or stream on the NHPR iPhone app and by clicking the Listen Live button at the top of the page to hear this coverage. Find more information about the DNC coverage on npr.org.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The AFL-CIO of New Hampshire held its annual Labor Day breakfast at St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Manchester this morning.  More than three hundred working men and women gathered to hear from Governor Lynch, Employment Security commissioner George Copadis, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, and others. 

The event’s featured guest and keynote speaker was AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, who says she came to New Hampshire not just to recognize New Hampshire’s workers, but to encourage them to get involved in the upcoming presidential and local elections.

Tune-in to New Hampshire Public Radio and check back online tonight as we continue to broadcast live NPR coverage from the Republican National Convention in Tampa. Join us from 8 - 11 pm.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Josh Rogers / NHPR

Speaking at an outdoor rally that drew close to 3000 people, Mitt Romney said the first victim of an Obama campaign has been the truth. The former Massachusetts governor added that he has made a promise not to increase taxes, and that he will stick to it.

Josh Rogers, NHPR

Speaking in the sweltering gymnasium of Windham High School, Mr. Obama told a crowd of 2300 that the policies of Mitt Romney and Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan would benefit the rich and hurt the middle class. Mr. Obama argued that under the budget supported by Ryan, Romney would pay less than 1 percent of his income in taxes. The President also said Romney’s plans would raise taxes on middle class families by $2000 a year.   

From now until November, President Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney will emphasize their differences. But the two men's lives actually coincide in a striking number of ways. In this installment of NPR's "Parallel Lives" series, a look at Obama's time at their shared alma mater.

Harvard professor Laurence Tribe is a sort of legal rock star, particularly among liberals. First-year law students he has never met don't just show up at his door saying, "I want to work for you." At least they didn't until March 31, 1989.

Now that he's all but certain to be the Republican challenging President Obama in November, Mitt Romney has begun to expand his operations. In the past week, he's named a top aide to head his vice presidential selection team, and his paid staff is expected to soon quadruple in size.

With the president's campaign well-staffed and spread across the map, it's become a game of catch-up for Romney.

There are Republican primary contests in five important states next Tuesday, but with Rick Santorum's departure from the race, they've gotten little attention.

Egyptian election officials upheld their ban of nearly half of the presidential candidates running in next month's contest. Among them are two leading Islamist candidates and the intelligence chief for former President Hosni Mubarak. The decision radically alters the race for a post that will shape Egypt's political landscape.

Minutes after official news outlets announced the election commission ruling, candidate Hazem Abu Ismail took to the airwaves to denounce it as a conspiracy.

Along party lines, the New Hampshire Senate today passed a second, more restrictive voter ID measure. Earlier this month, a bill requiring voters to show valid photo identification or sign an affidavit was approved with the backing of Town Clerks and the Secretary of State.

This new Republican-backed legislation would require those seeking to vote in New Hampshire to also register their vehicles in the State and apply for a New Hampshire driver’s license.

As part of a new campaign, dozens of citizen groups around the country are searching voter registration lists, looking for problems.

They're also training poll watchers to monitor this fall's elections.

Leaders of the effort — spawned by the Tea Party movement — say they want to make sure that elections are free from voter fraud. But critics say it's part of a campaign to suppress the votes of minorities, students and others who tend to vote Democratic.

Iran holds parliamentary elections on Friday, the first since the disputed, and many believe fraudulent, presidential election in 2009.

But unlike that presidential poll, candidates seeking to take on the country's conservative rulers will not be taking part Friday; they are mostly under house arrest or have been in prison for years now.

The focus will be on which conservatives end up on top and how many votes are cast.

Egypt's presidential race officially kicks off Saturday, and there are already more than a dozen contenders for what is expected to be the most competitive presidential election ever.

Nevertheless, many Egyptians fear those currently in power will try to manipulate the process to make sure that a candidate of their choosing wins.

At 41, Khaled Ali is the youngest Egyptian vying to be his country's next president.

The days leading up to the Palmetto state’s primary were a raucous affair with spirited television debates, candidates dropping out, major mud flinging and an inundation of attack ads. Now that the dust has settled, we’ll talk about  who won, who lost, and how this contest shapes the rest of the republican Presidential race. 

Guests

Every ten years, with new census data, states need to re-draw their political lines and it’s never pretty.  This year is no exception, with competing partisan maps and legislative approval on a final plan due in January.  We’ll see where the new lines may land and how that could affect New Hampshire voters this fall. 

Guests

The ballots have been tallied from yesterday’s municipal elections, and New Hampshire voters have by-and-large chosen to hang on to their incumbents.

Mayors in Concord, Manchester, Rochester all defeated challengers by wide margins, while those in Nashua, Laconia, and Berlin had uncontested elections.

The one exception was in Claremont where Republican challenger James Nielson unseated incumbent Democrat Deborah Cutts by fewer than forty votes.

Dan Tuohy (TWO-ee) a reporter with New Hampshire Patch, spent the evening watching the votes being counted in Concord.

Voters didn’t just vote for mayors and alderman yesterday.

Several ballot initiatives were also passed around the state.

Two similar measures in Manchester and Dover sought to change how the tax cap is calculated in those cities, and give slightly more freedom to elected officials to raise funds.

The measure passed in Manchester but was defeated in Dover.

Meanwhile in Concord, voters passed two charter amendments.

The first gives control of the school board, which had been in the hands of the legislature, back to the municipality.

Local Elections in New Hampshire Cities

Nov 8, 2011

Voters are going to the polls in 11 New Hampshire cities, to elect mayors, city councilors and school board members.

To get an overview, we turn to Todd Selig, town administrator in Durham and an avid municipal election watcher.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Secretary of State Bill Gardner chooses expected date, and says NH tradition lives on.

NH law requires its primary be held at least a week before any similar election. When Nevada tried to schedule its caucus in mid-January, NH threatened to hold the primary in December. Under pressure from national republicans and facing a boycott from some candidates, Nevada backed off, giving NH’s secretary of state Bill Gardner the window he sought.

"The tradition of NH presidential primary lives on and it will be held on the second Tuesday, the 10th day of next year 2012.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Former House Speaker joins race and signs pledge to cut taxes, spending and the size of government. NHPR's Josh Rogers reports.

Republican Newt Gingrich has added his name to the list of NH primary The former house speaker described vying for the presidency here as an awesome experience.

"From my perspective this is a place that is one of the great centers of American self-government. People have been made and broken in this state and it’s the center of real conversation."

Former Democratic state Senator Maggie Hassan has announced she’s running for governor. Hassan is running as a centrist.

Just like current Governor John Lynch, Maggie Hassan says she opposes a broad-based sales or income tax.

Over the past decade that position is almost a prerequisite for any Democratic candidate who wants to be taken seriously.

When it comes to raising existing taxes, Hassan says businesses must have an honest discussion about their priorities.

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