Environment

Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Something Wild: Habitat Hotspots

Credit Greta Tamošiunaite / Flickr

As the snow starts to melt you might notice a stark contrast in the landscape.  Maybe you were driving down the highway and noticed one shoulder was covered with snow while the other side was bare with a faint tinge of spring green shoots.  The cause?  Slope and aspect.  

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Word of Mouth
1:03 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

2.17.15: Why The American Outdoors Is So White, An Online Resource For Hackers, & Uncommon Core

Mount Gould and a View to the Continental Divide (Glacier National Park)
Credit Mark Stevens via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/oWwRHM

According to a report from the National Park Service only 7% of annual park visitors are African American. On today’s show, we delve into environmental history and cultural studies to find out why the story of the American outdoors is so white.

Then, environmentalists have taken many tacks to get people to be “greener”: the doomsday approach, education, shame. Now new research suggests another way to increase green behaviors: a salary. Why paying people an hourly wage decreases environmentally-friendly behaviors.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

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Giving Matters
12:59 am
Sat February 14, 2015

Giving Matters: Star Island Brings Visitors Closer To Nature And Themselves

Star Island, one the Isles of Shoals, is one of just four maritime islands in New Hampshire. It is owned and operated by the nonprofit Star Island Corporation. For years, Star has been a retreat and conference center and is also open to the public for day trips and overnight stays. Brad Greely is a minister who has a lifelong history with Star Island.

 

BG: Both my parents and my grandparents were people who came to Star Island. So I was brought at the ripe age of six months out to a conference. Then I went on to have a family and started bringing my own kids out here.

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri February 6, 2015

The Story Behind Those Antlers In The Snow

Dave Anderston

While following deer trails in snow you'll find pellets of scat and tufts of hair – coarse grey and white hair, hollow in cross-section. A more coveted souvenir are "sheds” – cast-off antlers.

After breeding ends in December, deer antlers loosen at the base. Once-formidable weapons of territorial defense drop with testosterone levels in January. The shed antlers cast by bucks and bull moose each winter are often promptly buried by snow.

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Giving Matters
12:56 am
Sat November 15, 2014

Giving Matters: Preserving NH's Land

Credit Courtesy NE Wilderness Trust

Fred and Rosalind Slavic built their home on a thickly wooded site in Fitzwilliam a half century ago. They wanted their 300-acre tract to remain in a wild state, so they have willed it to the Northeast Wilderness Trust. The trust will dismantle the buildings and retain an easement on the land.

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New England Snapshot
3:34 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

In The NEK, Climate Change Education Gets Down To Earth

Kristi LaFleur and Katrina McCullough build an anemometer at a teacher training workshop held by the Northwoods Stewardship Center in East Charleston.
Charlotte Albright VPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 6:03 pm

New federal science education standards adopted in Vermont require that students learn about climate change. So teachers are starting to create lesson plans with hands-on activities about weather patterns.

Some are getting that training deep in the woods of the Northeast Kingdom.

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New England Snapshot
3:21 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

One Square Mile: The Debate Over Providence's Industrial Waterfront

A view of Providence's industrial waterfront from Conley's Wharf, off Allens Avenue.

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:14 pm

All this week we’re taking a close look at the Narragansett Bay, for a series we call One Square Mile.  Today we look at the heavy industry that relies on the Providence waterfront.  Specifically, where those big piles of coal, scrap metal and salt,  sit along the Providence River.

Tuesday, independent Providence mayoral candidate Vincent “Buddy” Cianci, Jr. details his plan to turn the industrial waterfront to mixed use development, with things like hotels and marinas.   As Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender reports, that's been the subject of a decades-long battle.

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New England Snapshot
4:15 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Maine Candidates for Governor Spar Over Natural Gas Pipeline

Gov. Paul LePage discusses his views on a natural gas pipeline expansion Monday at a news event in Gorham.

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 4:19 pm

Republican Gov. Paul LePage is defending his support of legislation that could make it easier for private businesses to use eminent domain to seize property for natural gas pipeline expansion. The governor says the legislation is necessary to alleviate what he calls the New England energy crisis. But the governor's two opponents oppose the move.

At issue is federal legislation known as H.R.1900, The Natural Gas Permitting Reform Act, which aims to streamline the permitting process for the development of natural gas pipeline projects.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Tue September 30, 2014

All Eyes On Climate Change: N.H. Reacts To The U.N. Summit

Credit Michael O'Brien / Flickr/CC

Last week, more than 100 world leaders attended the United Nations summit on climate change in New York City.

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Giving Matters
11:22 am
Sat September 27, 2014

Giving Matters: WOW Trail Brings People Out

A view from the WOW Trail.

WOW stands for Winnipesaukee Opechee Winnisquam, but the rail trail that winds across Laconia might just as well be named for the exclamation of its patrons as they marvel over the views on offer. Plans in the works will have the trail’s running nine miles, connecting Meredith with Franklin.

Though unfinished, Laconia police chief Chris Adams sees the trail as a positive addition to the city. “One of the things I love doing when I’m driving around is looking down the trail head to see families and couples and children riding bikes or walking.”

 

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Giving Matters
9:20 am
Mon September 22, 2014

Giving Matters: Prescott Farms Gets Kids Outside

Credit Courtesy Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center

The Prescott Farm Environmental Education Center offers year-round programs for all ages. Its “Wildquest” camps help connect kids with nature and their local landscapes. 

Prescott Farm has always been a landmark for Gretchen O’Neill. “We’re very grateful that our daughter, Gabriella, can come here to attend the camp, or that we can come up and explore it and walk the trails.

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Environment
9:54 am
Sat September 20, 2014

Granite Staters Travel To New York City For Climate Change Demonstration

One of many artist posters created in anticipation of the Sept 21 climate march in New York City.
Credit Via Creative Resistance

More than two hundred New Hampshire residents are headed to New York City Sunday for a massive climate change demonstration.

Organizers of the People’s Climate March – which include environmental advocacy groups, labor unions, and religious organizations – think anywhere from one to four hundred thousand people could be in attendance.

From the Granite State there are 3 full charter buses leaving from Concord,  another two are coming from Maine to pick up folks in Portsmouth.

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Newscast
9:21 am
Tue August 26, 2014

Laconia Beaches Cleared For Swimmers After Testing Positive For Bacteria

Three beaches in Laconia that tested positive for bacteria last week are now in the clear.

The Parks and Recreation Department says Opechee Cove, Opechee Point and Weirs Beach posted advisories for high E. coli levels between Aug. 19 and Aug. 21.

Director Kevin Dunleavy tells The Citizen the beaches now all have clearance after further testing.

Education
3:27 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

Four New Charter Schools Set To Open In New Hampshire

A new student scrambles trough the woods.
Credit Mountain Village Charter School

Most students across New Hampshire return to school this week, including students at Mountain Village Charter School in Plymouth. The school is one of the state’s four new charter schools opening this fall.

The actual building for Mountain Village Charter School is still under construction. So for the first week, the school’s 38 elementary students will be outside.

Teachers lead the students through a Swahili song and have them bark like dogs - mostly as a way to start the school year on a fun note.

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Giving Matters
12:40 am
Sat August 16, 2014

Giving Matters: Star Island Brings Visitors Closer To Nature And Themselves

Star Island, on the Isles of Shoals, is one of just four maritime islands in New Hampshire. It is owned and operated by the nonprofit Star Island Corporation. For years, Star has been a retreat and conference center and is also open to the public for day trips and overnight stays. Brad Greely is a minister who has a lifelong history with Star Island.

 

BG: Both my parents and my grandparents were people who came to Star Island. So I was brought at the ripe age of six months out to a conference. Then I went on to have a family and started bringing my own kids out here.

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Environment
3:58 pm
Wed August 13, 2014

Innovative Solar Farm To Be Built On Rutland Landfill

Green Mountain Power President Mary Powell stands with Governor Peter Shumlin, Rutland Mayor Chris Louras and others to announce the groundbreaking of a new $10 million solar farm being constructed on a Rutland landfill.
Nina Keck

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 12:58 pm

Green Mountain Power broke ground in Rutland Tuesday on a new $10 million solar project that the utility says will not only generate clean energy, but also provide emergency back up power to parts of the city when needed.

Solar arrays are sprouting up all over Rutland County and some of the larger ones have generated a fair amount of controversy and criticism.

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Newscast
11:51 am
Sun August 10, 2014

N.H. Loon Count Increases Slightly From Last Year

Credit Matthew / Flickr Creative Commons

The annual count of loons on New Hampshire's lakes shows a slight increase over last year, but experts caution the census only provides a glimpse into the true population.   Harry Vogel of the Loon Preservation Committee says 622 observers counted 549 adult loons during a one-hour period on July 19. That's up from the 520 adults observed last year. Vogel notes there were 26 fewer observers last year, so it's too early to say there are more loons.  A more complete picture will emerge in a couple of weeks when full-year monitoring results are released.

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Newscast
11:47 am
Sun August 10, 2014

Fish And Game Dept. Asks Anglers To Release Radio Tagged Bass

Credit Gregory Heinrichs / Flickr Creative Commons

The New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game is asking anglers fishing in the Squam Lakes to immediately release any largemouth and smallmouth bass that were radio-tagged as part of a state study.   The bass will have a thin wire protruding from their underside and a yellow numbered tag near their dorsal fin.   The goal of the three-year study is to determine the percentage of bass returning to Big Squam Lake after being lake and weighed in and released in Little Squam Lake, and how long it takes them.

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Word of Mouth
2:09 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

8.06.14: Why Invasive Species Aren't All Bad, Refrigeration In China, And Dining Hall Hacks

"A Beautiful Invasive. Ceratina smaragdula, male, captured on Hawaii, Oahu, March 2012. This Asian species, along with others has invaded the Hawaiian islands where it thrives in sea of introduced garden plants found at lower elevations on the islands." -USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab
Credit USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab via Flickr

Today on Word of Mouth, invasive species like Zebra Mussels to Asian Carp, are destroying biodiversity across North America. Or are they? Also, we'll look into China’s push to build a frozen food infrastructure. The number of urban Chinese households with a refrigerator has risen from just 7 percent to 95 percent in a decade. We’ll find out what that means for global climate change.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


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Environment
8:04 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Vermont Conducts Loon Count To Gauge Health Of Bird

Credit Flkr Creative Commons / KeithCarver

Experts estimate there are nearly 300 adult loons living on Vermont's lakes and ponds, up from just a couple dozen 30 years ago.

On Saturday, more than 200 volunteers spread out across Vermont for the annual loon survey.

The results of the survey are trickling in, but Eric Hanson of the Vermont Center for Ecostudies and the coordinator of the Vermont Loon Conservation Project, says there are many more birds now than just a few years ago.

He says 15 years ago there were around 100 loons and in 1983 biologists counted only 29.

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NH News
9:56 am
Tue July 15, 2014

$2.2M In Drinking Water Grants Available For Southern N.H.

Credit Dennis Amith via Flickr CC

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services says there is $2.2 million available this fall for grants to protect drinking water in the southern part of the state.

The money comes from a fund established to offset impacts to wetlands and streams associated with the widening of Interstate 93 between the Massachusetts border in Salem and the I-93/I-293 interchange in Manchester.

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NH News
10:23 am
Sun June 29, 2014

New Hampshire Beaches Get High Marks For Water Quality

Hampton Beach State Park got high marks in the new report.
Credit Josue Mendivil via Flickr CC

Three beaches in New Hampshire are getting high marks for clean water quality.

The beaches are Hampton Beach State Park, Wallis Sands Beach at Wallis Road, and Wallis Sands State Park beach.

The Natural Resources Defense Council put them at "superstar" status along with 32 other beaches nationally in its annual "Testing the Waters" report.

Officials say New Hampshire ranks second out of 30 states that are part of the EPA's beach monitoring program.

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Newscast
7:40 am
Thu June 26, 2014

'Last Surviving' Elm Tree In Portsmouth Has Died

An Elm tree with Dutch Elm Disease, which is responsible for killing trees up and down the East Coast.
Credit Robin Nystron via Flickr CC

City officials in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, say one of their oldest trees has died.

The American elm tree on Peirce Island was over 100 years old.

The Portsmouth Herald reports members of the Peirce Island Committee noticed the elm didn't sprout buds in the spring. The tree has no leaves.

Peter Loughlin, chairman of the city's Trees and Public Greenery Committee, said Dutch elm disease has killed American elms up and down the East Coast. He said the tree was the last surviving elm in the city.

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Newscast
1:49 pm
Sun June 22, 2014

UNH Touts Unique Compost System

The University of New Hampshire is celebrating its use of a unique energy recovery composting system.  UNH is believed to be the only university in the nation with such a compost facility, which captures generated heat for water that can be pumped to reservoirs and used for wash water, provide pre-heated water for a boiler or be used in heating systems.  The system at UNH's Organic Dairy Research Farm, installed last year, preheats water used to clean and sterilize a tank and tubing in the milk room.  The compost facility was named for Joshua Nelson, who advanced the technology.

Something Wild
12:39 am
Fri June 20, 2014

Something Wild Celebrates Solstice

Sunrise from the Mt Washington Auto Road.

Today is the last lengthening day of the year. Tomorrow - Summer Solstice - is the first full day of summer. Hooray! In that sense, today is the "end of the beginning" while tomorrow marks the "beginning of the end."

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Wed June 18, 2014

N.H.'s War On Invasive Bugs & Plants

Credit Don't Move Firewood / Flickr/CC

In New Hampshire lakes, rivers and ponds, non-indigenous plants have moved in choking out the natural flora and fauna, but volunteers and state officials have taken up the fight against them. We’ll look at the latest in that fight, as well as invasive insects from the Emerald Ash Borer to the Wooly Adelgid.

GUESTS:

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Environment
4:12 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Busting The Lady Slipper Myth: Not Rare, Legal To Pick

Credit Distant Hill Gardens

The New Hampshire state wildflower is blooming, and with it, the myth that surrounds it: that it’s super rare, and illegal to pick. In fact, the pink and white flower we know as the Lady Slipper is quite common. And picking this flower is completely legal.

“They are not considered ‘rare,’ they are actually common but are listed on the ‘special concerns’ list because they have propagation and climate issues,” according to NH Roots

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Something Wild
12:33 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Something Wild: The Eerie Sounding Veery

The song of the veery is a haunting, ethereal song. Males sing at dusk, a time when not many other birds sing and daytime winds have calmed. It's also a time when the air turns damp; dense, moist air transfers sound waves better than dry air.

If you listen to the song carefully, you can hear an echo or tremolo effect (more on this below), because songbirds have, essentially, a double voice box that can produce two notes at the same time. (The left voice box is lower pitched than the right one.) In a sense, a singing veery harmonizes with itself.

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Morning Edition
2:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Bobcats In The Granite State

Credit Wayne Dumbleton Flickr CC

Researchers out of Durham are close to completing a study on bobcat populations in the Granite State. Though no one is sure how many bobcats are in New Hampshire, increased sightings and captures over the past decade have led researchers to believe bobcats are rebounding.

Dr. Marian Litvaitis and her husband John, both professors at UNH, have spearheaded the investigation as part of a project collaboration . Now in the project's fourth year, Litvaitis and her team are now focused primarily on bobcat genetics. I talked with Dr. Litvaitis about the rebounding cat on Thursday:

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North Country
2:50 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Half The Wood For Berlin Biomass Coming From New Hampshire

About 51 percent of the wood purchased for the new Burgess BioPower biomass plant in Berlin during its first two months of operation came from New Hampshire, according to a new “sustainability” report filed with the state’s Site Evaluation Committee.

Thirty-five percent came from Maine.

Five percent from Vermont.

Eight percent from Massachusetts.

And "one truck load" came from Canada.

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