heipei via flickr Creative Commons

From the Afghan girl with startling green eyes to the ghostly wreckage of the Titanic, there’s just something about the iconic covers of National Geographic that burns into our collective memory. On today’s show: we get an insider’s view of the cover selection process.

Then, from microscopic lenses to compact cameras, the digital age has upped the ante for nature photographers and opened the door for whole new levels of disruption and manipulation. We’ll ponder the ethics of wildlife photography.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Photo by Patriziasoliani, from Flickr Creative Commons

This month, award-winning anthropologist Jane Goodall was supposed to be celebrating the release of her fifteenth book “Seeds of Hope”. Instead, publication of the work has been delayed after investigation revealed Goodall borrowed a number of passages without attribution.  While reviewers for the Washington Post and New York Times held back from using the “P” word outright, a vocal minority is very concerned about the amount of copied material in ‘Seeds’ – and the dubious content of the book itself. Michael Moynihan is Cultural News Editor for The Daily Beast. You can read his article about Goodall’s new book here.

"Socially Responsible", its a catchword used by many businesses these days whether they want to promote their environmental friendliness, political awareness or by the way they treat their employees.  "We talk to the author of a new book who says there are many issues to consider when deeming a business socially responsible, both for the consumer and for the companies themselves. In some cases, there are uncomfortable tradeoffs, it’s nearly impossible to fulfill every ideal. And then there’s making a profit still a necessity, even if you’re eco-friendly.


We sift through a new study that gives New Hampshire low marks in what it calls “integrity” in State government.  While the report says the Granite state does well in some areas like the Executive and Judicial branches, it failed in others like public access to information and ethics enforcement.  We’ll look at what’s behind this report and how some in New Hampshire are reacting to it.