The Exchange

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Laura Knoy is taking NHPR's flagship show on the road for a special live edition of The Exchange, featuring a forum on business and sustainability.

Click here to register for this free event.

The forum will take place on Tuesday, June 28th at Labelle Winery in Amherst, and will be a unique opportunity to tackle the tough questions facing many New Hampshire businesses around energy, conservation, regulation, "green" practices, and more.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

We ask a question NPR member stations around the country are exploring this week as part of the series, A Nation Engaged: Does My Vote Matter?  We get a Granite State perspective, including on our First in the Nation status and a recent proposal to possibly pair our primary with Massachusetts.  We'll also look at presidential politics in the wake of the Orlando shootings and a visit to New Hampshire by Republican Donald Trump. 

This program was hosted by Dean Spiliotes, Civic Scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at Southern New Hampshire University.

Michael Samuels for NHPR

You might have heard about the Food Modernization Safety Act, a large-scale overhaul of food safety rules aimed at reducing food-borne illnesses.

Here in New Hampshire, home to an estimated 4,200 commercial farms, those in the agriculture industry are bracing for potentially big changes in their operations.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - May 27, 2016

May 26, 2016

We'll be discussing the recent class action lawsuits by residents with private wells near the Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics plant in Merrimack.  Saint-Gobain is the likely source of water contamination in the area, according to state officials.  With  bipartisan fanfare, New Hampshire launches the first statewide initiative of a national campaign called Change Direction, promoting more open discussion of mental illness.   Plus, the legislature winds up it's session with negotiation on issues from police body cameras to mandatory minimum sentences to short-term rentals like AirBNB.

Ceyhun (Jay) Isik / https://flic.kr/p/cG7qFL

In recent weeks, confusion and unease have increased in several New Hampshire towns where contamination with the chemical PFOA has been detected in private wells.

Though the EPA has yet to determine a safe level of PFOA in drinking water, Sarah Pillsbury, the administrator for public drinking water with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is hoping that's about to change. 

How does University of New Hampshire President Mark Huddleston explain the size of the school's top salaries, including his own, to students and families struggling to pay tuition?

The leader of New Hampshire’s flagship university, speaking on NHPR's The Exchange Monday, said the school needs to offer competitive rates to attract the best talent — but Huddleston maintained that the school isn’t “overpaying” in the process.

Getty Images

The battle lines on the fight over the future of New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion are well-defined as the issue comes up for a vote in the state Senate tomorrow.

On Wednesday’s episode of The Exchange, State Sens. Jeb Bradley and Andy Sanborn — a vocal proponent and opponent of the expansion, respectively — sparred over a number of elements of the program, including its effects on the state's drug crisis.

Bobcat Debate: Should Hunting Resume in N.H.?

Feb 16, 2016
National Park Service via flickr/CC

While most states allow bobcat hunting, New Hampshire has not since 1989, when the animal's population had dwindled to dangerously low levels. Now this week, the Fish and Game Commission will vote whether to allow a limited annual hunt of 50 bobcats. We examine what's driving the support and the opposition, which has been fierce, and how this debate exposes broader cultural divides. 

NHPR

GUESTS: 

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was the latest presidential hopeful to stop by the NHPR offices in Concord for a candidate forum with The Exchange.

After she had a few moments to mingle with a small crowd at the building's entrance, Clinton — accompanied by a few staffers and Secret Service personnel — offered her best "elevator pitch" explaining why she's qualified to be president. 

On his latest swing through New Hampshire, Democratic presidential hopeful Martin O'Malley stopped by NHPR's offices in Concord for a conversation with The Exchange

We caught up with O'Malley — a former mayor of Baltimore and governor of Maryland — on his way up to the studios to ask for his (literal) elevator pitch pitch on why he should be president.

  John Kasich, the Ohio governor and Republican presidential hopeful, stopped by NHPR's offices in Concord recently for an interview with The Exchange.

On the way up to the studio,  we caught up with Kasich (and a few new friends) — asking him, specifically, for a quick pitch on why he should be president. Here's what he had to say.

It's our Friday New Hampshire News Roundup - but this hour, instead of the week's headlines, we'll look back over the past two decades. That's because today is The Exchange's 20th birthday. On October 9th, 1995, NHPR kicked off this new program, which remains New Hampshire's only state-wide call-in show. So to celebrate we're pulling from the archives and reflect on some of the biggest stories we've covered.

Top Nine N.H. News Stories of 2014

Dec 26, 2014
Sara Plourde / NHPR

A special edition of the Friday New Hampshire News Roundup: we review the major stories of the year -- from the midterm elections to the Market Basket saga, and more. 

GUESTS:

  • Jeff Feingold – editor of the New Hampshire Business Review.
  • Dean Spiliotes - Civic Scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at Southern New Hampshire University and author of the website NHPoliticalCapital.com

ALSO JOINING US:

As Kansas City finds itself in its first World Series since 1985, its easy to think upon our own championship drought, which ended in 2004.  

It’s been a decade since Boston's boys of summer willed their way out of the American League Championship Series in unlikely fashion and finally put to bed the ghosts of Ruth, Dent, Buckner, Boone (and countless others).

With the Roosevelts running (and running) on PBS stations across the country, NH’s most famous documentarian has again put Walpole on the map. Ken Burns and his production company Florentine Films have won dozens of awards – Emmys, Grammys, a Peabody and a Columbia-DuPont Award. Much of the success can also be attributed to writer/historian Dayton Duncan who was a key collaborator on many of Florentine’s projects including The National Parks, The Civil War and Baseball.

“Our country is a nation on the make,” according to historian Walter McDougall. He says we’re builders, dreamers, go-getters, inventers and organizers, so much so that "hustling" has become an indelible part of the American character and American history. He means it in all senses of the word, even going back as far as colonists's first arrival on American soil.

The Exchange on the Road
with Laura Knoy

July 10, 2014

5:30 pm Reception; 6:30 pm Event

Colonial Theatre, Bethlehem, NH

The event is free to attend, but tickets are required. Register for tickets here.

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www.BackgroundNow.com / Flickr/Creative Commons

It’s town meeting time! A storied tradition in northern New England, and in New Hampshire especially. This week I found an old interview with Dartmouth College professor of history, Jere Daniell. He spoke with an unidentified NHPR reporter in July, 1994. Daniell has made close study of our town meeting and the history of the institution.

The roots of town meeting go back three centuries and have evolved over time. Once viewed as an extension of the old boys network which governed many towns, it enjoyed a bit of a renaissance in the early 20th century. 

NHPR / Michael Brindley

9:56: Gov. Hassan on raising the gas tax: “We need a modern and solid infrastructure if we’re going to have a 21st century economy.” There has been growing consensus that we need to address infrastructure challenges. On bill proposing gas tax increase tied to CPI: “In its current form, yes, I would sign it.”

9:52: Gov. Hassan on minimum wage: “Feel very strongly” it is the right thing to do to increase it. 

Next week on The Exchange:

We'll start the week with a rebroadcast of a favorite show about STEM and liberal arts education. Next, the book Ecstatic Nation, about the American Civil War. Later in the week, we'll check in with developments in the debt ceiling negotiations, and end on Friday with our weekly New Hampshire news roundup. E-mail us to share your thoughts or questions ahead of time at exchange@nhpr.org and join us all next week, every morning live at 9am, and again at 8pm.

Next week on The Exchange:

PSNH

Last month, President Obama vowed to take on climate change, bypassing Congress and pledging to use his authority under existing laws. The centerpiece of his plan is imposing, for the first time, limits on carbon emissions from existing power plants.  Environmentalists applauded the announcement, but industry representatives balked, calling the approach heavy handed and warning of plant closures. We'll look at how this debate affects New Hampshire and the region.

Guests:

Next week on The Exchange, we begin with a discussion of President Obama's recently announced plan for tackling climate change -- an approach that includes curbing carbon emissions and fortifying communities against severe weather events, such as storms and droughts.  We'll also talk with a roundtable of Granite Staters about the debate in Washington over immigration reform. And we talk with Manchester Police Chief David Mara, as part of the news department's series on crime in the Queen City, starting Monday and running through Labor Day.

Next week on The Exchange, we begin with the latest bills to expand gambling in New Hampshire. Supporters believe the cards may be finally right for their cause, given Governor Maggie Hassan’s support for some type of increased gambling. Later, we’ll hear highlights from President Obama’s State of the Union address and get your reaction. And we’ll end the week with the ins and outs of Governor Hassan’s budget.

Michael Brindley, NHPR

In an exit interview of sorts with The Exchange Tuesday morning, Gov. John Lynch said he has no interest in pursuing elected office in Washington, D.C.

Michael Jolly / Flickr

In Denver, president Obama and republican nominee Mitt Romney faced off in the first of three forums. The focus was domestic policy - from jobs to taxes to federal debt. We're playing back some debate highlights, covering the major themes....and are including your thoughts in our conversation.

GUESTS:

Wayne Lesperance – professor of political science at New England College and director of the Center for Civic Engagement

James Sarmiento / Flickr

We continue our “Issue of the Week” election series…and today we find out where the candidates for Congress, Governor, and President stand on.. education. Though all agree on the importance of strong schools and universities, candidates part ways on how to achieve this aim.  We’ll take a look at how they plan to tackle the many educational challenges, from student debt to funding state universities. 

GUESTS:

Danielle Curtis: Education reporter for the Telegraph of Nashua

Sam Evans-Brown: Education and environment reporter for NHPR

Credit: Sara Plourde / NHPR

The “Man-cession” becomes the “man-covery.” Men suffered huge job losses during the recession when construction and manufacturing were especially hard hit. But now, they’re gaining jobs at a faster pace than women, in some cases entering fields long-dominated by female workers. We’ll examine this latest shift in the labor market.

Guests:

Mark J. Perry – Professor of Finance and Business Economics at the University of Michigan and Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.

From Burundi to Burma, from Afghanistan to Uzbekistan, refugees from around the globe have been placed in New Hampshire to start their lives anew.  Here they find new freedoms and far less dangers but new challenges as well.  Many have to learn English, the American laws, become educated and find work.  Federal programs help a lot but so do the cities and towns in which they are placed.  Now Manchester wants to put a moratorium on any new refugees resettling here.  City officials worry that they currently don't have enough resources to assist its current residents and with tight budgets get

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