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Logan Shannon / NHPR

The Ferguson decision, Eric Garner protests, immigration, all topics we avoid at the dinner table, but opinions run free on Facebook. On today’s show what to do when your Facebook friends make racist posts.

And, when it comes to Twitter followers, Katy Perry, Justin Beiber, and President Obama hold the top spots. We veer off social media’s beaten path to share some hidden gems in the twittersphere.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

The Ferguson decision, Eric Garner protests, and immigration are all topics we avoid at the holiday table, but opinions run free on Facebook. On today’s show what do you do when your Facebook friends make racist posts?

Plus, think ice fishing is for people who like to drink and dislike their families? The fishing nerds say the times they have-a-changed…

Also today, bad taste among the British; we’ll review the UK traditions of really bad Christmas number ones.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

West McGowan via flickr Creative Commons

The preseason has already started, and football fans across the country are gearing up for another action-packed season of hard losses, big wins, and epic hits.

On today’s show, a provocative new book makes a case for why not to watch football. Plus, Iraqi cities under siege, Ebola cases climbing, unrest in Ferguson; despite the tough news, your Facebook news feed may look remarkably chipper, we’ll look into Facebook’s carefully orchestrated positive feedback loop.    

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Myspace. The velvet leisure suit of social media.  Fewer than six short years ago, MySpace boasted more members than Facebook.  Today, you’ll be hard pressed to find anybody who admits to having an account. The thing is, you know lots of people who have a MySpace profile – but many of them haven’t logged in for years.  You might even be one of them.

gargudojr via Flickr Creative Commons

With more than a quarter of the players born outside the US, professional baseball is the UN of American pro sports. We take a look at a position crucial to a team’s success:  the interpreter…and how the job requires more than mere translation. Plus, France’s government is banning English words like ‘fast-food’ and ‘hashtag’ in the name of cultural preservation…we find out why the words are unlikely to disappear from the vernacular anytime soon. And, Sue Miller speaks about her new book, The Arsonist.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


NHPR's First Facebook Posts

Feb 3, 2014
[ Mooi ] via flickr Creative Commons

To say "happy 10th birthday" to Facebook, Word of Mouth asked the staff of NHPR: What was your first Facebook status update?

Here's what they shared:

2.3.14: Ten Years Of Facebook And The American Dream

Feb 3, 2014
Will Clayton via flickr Creative Commons

Still stuffed from Super Bowl snacks? Well, make some room for birthday cake because Facebook is turning ten. We're celebrating with a roundtable discussion about the decade-old social network. (BYOC- bring your own cake). Then, what happens when parents of two African American boys send their kids to Dalton, a prestigious, and predominantly white school on Manhattan’s upper east side? The social experiment is documented by filmmakers Michèle Stephenson and Joe Brewster. Listen to the full show and scroll down for more on each segment.

alliance1911 via Flickr Creative Commons

As Instagram passes its third birthday, a small but growing community of users are beginning to utilize the website for the private exchange of goods. Two million of the site’s annual photo uploads are items being put up for sale, with the actual negotiations taking place via comment threads and private messages.

Among the many items being legally sold through Instagram are firearms.  Brian Ries is Senior Social Media Editor at The Daily Beast and joins us to explain.

theseoduke via Flickr Creative Commons

We’ve found yet another reason to be wary of what you post on Facebook. Potential employers, college admissions officers and vigilant parents are among the entities that monitor the personal information, photos, and links we choose to share on social media.  Add to that list credit bureaus and payment processing companies wanting to verify identity and assess credit-worthiness. Neal Ungerleider is a reporter for Fast Company and someone we regularly turn to for the stranger side of business news. He recently reported on this new twist in the evolving social media story, and discussed it further with us.

10ch via Flickr Creative Commons

Time for a high school confessional…the digital edition. Teenagers and young adults often get stern warnings against over-sharing on social media…one incriminating photo or post could torpedo a college or job application, after all. Now, students across America are turning to online confession pages – anonymous forums for relaying painful experiences, grievances, and the baring of souls.  The appeal of anonymity and ease of use found on Facebook makes confession pages extremely popular among young adults. For example, UNH’s Facebook confession page has more than sixty-four hundred followers.  Justine Sharrock is West Coast editor at Buzzfeed.com; she joined us to talk about high school confession pages.

Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

In this special edition of Word of Mouth: are we catching up with technology? This week we'll explore the very human way we interact with technology; resistance is futile.

Yesterday, I was the recipient of a random act of kindness. While pushing my shopping cart through the aisles of our local Hannaford, I noticed a brightly colored envelope had been dropped in it…inside was a lottery ticket, and a note encouraging me to perform random acts of kindness for others…Well, it didn’t take much digging to figure out that this act wasn’t so random, but part of a project launched by five friends who met in college, and are now staying connected with each other through their generosity toward strangers. The five friends are: Trista Bradt, Ashley Agresta, Kristin Burger, Chelsea Kennedy and Jessica Johnson. We spoke to Jessica about the project. You can follow the “Caz Girls” on their Facebook page, and donate to their other kindness projects at their Go Fund Me site.

Elvis is in the building!  Or at least on your smartphone.  Despite being laid to rest nearly 35 years ago, the King of Rock n’ Roll still posts on Facebook, and tweets several times a day…here’s a sample: “love me tender, love me sweet, never let me go… hashtag Valentine’s Day deals at Shop Elvis!”  The BBC’s Matt Danzico recently looked into the social media afterlives of departed celebrities – he lets us in on how they do it. 

Photo Credit Daquella Manera via Flickr Creative Commons

Greta Garbo is best known throughout her storied career for her plea from the 1932 film Grand Hotel. She later left the spotlight and chose to live the rest of her life privately and anonymously – an exit considered freakish by the public and a press which shadowed her the rest of her life. Today, we know far more about everyday citizens who’s allure falls far short of Garbo’s.

Tanja Hollander

Produced with Zach Nugent

Why These Dogs "Like" Facebook

Jun 19, 2012

Produced with Emma Ruddock

Part 1: Is "Liking" Free Speech?/The Legacy of Limmer

Photo Credit DenisDervisevic, Via Flickr Creative Commons

A sheriff’s office employee in Hampton Virginia alleges that in 2009 he was professionally de-friended after “liking” the Facebook page of his boss’s political opponent.  But in a wrongful termination suit that concluded earlier this year, a judge ruled the other way…saying that “merely ‘liking’ a Facebook is insufficient speech to merit constitutional protection.”  Ken Paulson is President and CEO of the F

Facing off over Facebook

May 31, 2012

A recent article in the Atlantic magazine caused a firestorm of debate over the social network’s ability to connect humankind, suggesting that it is contributing to loneliness of epic proportions. But not everyone “likes” this theory; some argue that Facebook with its almost one billion users is connecting us in new and powerful ways, even spurring for social change. 

Guests

Posting on Facebook is an easy way to connect with people, but it also can be a means to alienate them. That can be particularly troublesome for those with low self-esteem.

People with poor self-image tend to view the glass as half empty. They complain a bit more than everyone else, and they often share their negative views and feelings when face to face with friends and acquaintances.

Social media meets old media:

Saying that he's convinced "the demand for long-form, quality journalism is strong in our country," Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that he's buying The New Republic.

That's a magazine, as Steve says, which is four times older than its new owner. Hughes is 28.

When a company files to go public it has to lay out in black and white the biggest risks that face the firm. What could kill it? What could undermine its business? Wipe out all its investors' money? Executives are required to reveal this by law.

(Photo by Menage a Moi via Flickr Creative Commons)

We've gotten loads of feedback about our new credits. Mostly, they've been enthusiastically embraced, but one listener disagreed on his Facebook page, tagging us a post that called our new credits "juvenile." Ouch.

What do you think? Listen here and leave a comment on our Facebook page, or send us a tweet. 

(<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/sheepies/3539476944/sizes/m/in/photostream/" target="_blank">Andreas Photography</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

Before vaccines became standard care, parents who wanted to build their children’s immunity to common diseases often brought them to play with other neighborhood kids already infected with bugs like the measles and chicken pox. Now, a small group of parents opposed to vaccines are reviving “pox parties” via social media sites like Facebook. Recently, one mother catered to that  crowd by advertising homemade lollipops tainted with the varicella virus…yep.