fall foliage

Britta Greene for NHPR

Haven't been impressed with the leaf peeping in New Hampshire so far this year? You're not alone.

Dave Lutz, a research associate in the Environmental Studies Department at Dartmouth College, has been thinking a lot about fall foliage for a paper he’s been working on. He’s been watching what he calls “indicator trees” along his drive to work – certain species he watches for their color and behavior.

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Despite the forest fire in North Woodstock, tourism officials are urging visitors that the White Mountains are open for business.

The Lost River Gorge is closed this weekend due to the fire on about 25 acres on nearby Dilly Cliff, but no property was damaged as a result. 

Colleen Eliason of the White Mountains Attraction Association says she expects about 30,000 visitors to come to the area this holiday weekend.

The fall foliage season is sweeping through New Hampshire, causing residents and leaf-peepers to appreciate anew the forests in the state.  The colors of the season are a function of forest health, and we look closely at efforts to restore and protect three iconic tree species: elm, ash, and chestnut.  And a new report finds that New England is losing 65 acres of forestland per day


Kimberly Vardeman / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire tourism officials are forecasting all-time highs for visitors and spending this fall season, with a good chunk of the travel occurring over Columbus Day Weekend.

The New Hampshire Division of Travel and Tourism is expecting 9.8 million visitors to spend $1.5 billion throughout the fall. The figures represent increases of 4 percent and 5 percent, respectively, over last fall.

The division says scenic drives and outdoor recreation will remain the most popular activities, followed by visiting farm stands, orchards, festivals, and family.

mwms1916 via Flickr

As fall comes to a close, winter imminent, there is a quiet that sweeps across New Hampshire. We celebrate the changing of the leaves but once they’ve fallen from the trees there’s really not much to look at before snowfall, right? Of course not! There’s always something waiting to be discovered in your back yard and this time of year is no exception.

pfly via Flickr Creative Commons

 

Dry conditions from an ongoing drought in much of New Hampshire could cut short the state's lucrative fall foliage season.

The Portsmouth Herald reports that across southern New Hampshire, maples and other leafy trees known for their vibrant hues are changing color or dropping their leaves early— a potential sign of distress.

Kyle Lombard, of the state Division of Forest and Lands, says tree-targeting insect pests are thriving this year due to the dry weather.

Need a fix of bright fall foliage? Kyle Waring can help with that. He’s now in his second year of business collecting and selling autumn leaves.

Waring tells Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about his business called Ship Foliage and how he preserves the leaves. And for another seasonal fix, if New England has another snowy winter, Waring will continue his second year of Ship Snow, Yo! – packing and shipping that fluffy white stuff.

ilovebutter via Flickr Creative Commons

It’s October, and it’s supposed to be foliage season. But the splendor of the foliage in Northern New England isn’t what it used to be. Climate change, local pollution, invasive species, disease and development have all conspired to change the multicolored landscape to make it less so. NHPR's Peter Biello spoke with David Brooks, a reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at GraniteGeek.org

Jack Rodolico / NHPR

Hikers around the Granite State are enjoying what’s left of the fall colors. One favorite viewing spot: North America’s most frequently hiked mountain. 

On October’s peak foliage weekends, up to 7,000 people visit Monadnock State Park. The summit is packed—you can bump into just about anyone. Neuroscience student Maddie Diaz drove up with some PhD students from Brandeis University. She’s originally from Miami.

"This is not only my first hike, but my first opportunity to see autumn foliage," Diaz says. "Oh, the view is stunning.  I've never seen colors like this before!"

ilovebutter via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire tourism officials say the fall foliage is most vibrant and at or just past peak in the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee region.

Officials emphasize that New Hampshire's parks and campgrounds are open and unaffected by the federal government shutdown. Ranger stations in the White Mountains National Forest are closed.

Foliage is now past peak in Pittsburg and most areas of the Great North Woods, which typically peak first.

North Conway and Lincoln are at or near peak, while Bristol, Hebron and Rumney are at 50 percent.

The 65th annual fall foliage festival took place in Warner, New Hampshire this weekend. Attendees could purchase crafts by local artisans, go on rides, or share a country breakfast the United Church of Warner.

Fall Colors At Peak In Northern N.H.

Oct 3, 2012
<a href="http://raylarose.com/">Raymond Larose</a> / Flickr / CC

New Hampshire's weekly fall foliage report says the colors are at their peak in the Great North Woods and in the White Mountains region.