Farms

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Cruise along just about any back road in New Hampshire and you’re likely to come across an old wooden barn. The state is home to more than 15,000 of them, each one an iconic reminder of New Hampshire’s agricultural roots.

But after decades of neglect, there’s no shortage of run-down eyesores out there, seemingly one good wind gust away from collapsing.

Matt Allworth via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/7ZZiPM

Doctors Without Borders provides emergency medical aid to people the world over, and is funded almost entirely by individuals. So, why did they turn down free pneumonia vaccines from Pfizer? On today’s show we’ll look into the hidden costs of free vaccines.

Plus, futuristic TV shows and movies make facial recognition technology seem like a sure bet, but a new report reveals problems with racial bias, and reliability. And like it or not, it's already being used today.

We’ll also check in with the latest installment of The Bookshelf with author Chelsey Philpot.

Recently the Something Wild team went for a hike. One thing to bear in mind when walking with knowledgeable biologists like Chris and Dave, is that hikes take longer than they might if you were walking on your own. 

There’s a crisis facing New Hampshire’s dairy industry.

Nineteen of the state’s 120 wholesale dairy farms have closed this year.

Now, there’s growing concern about what kind of relief – if any – might be available for these farmers and where the industry goes from here.

 

New Hampshire dairy farmers say low milk prices and ongoing drought conditions have contributed to the state losing 16 percent of those farms over the past eight months.

The state's agriculture commissioner says 19 of the state's 120 dairies have closed this year. The state had lost 10 dairies over the previous four years combined.

Federal agricultural prices list 100 pounds of milk as selling for $14.80 last month. That's down from $23.40 in June 2014 and $16.90 in June 2015.

Producer Retailer Magazine via FLICKR/CC

After many years of debate, the federal Food Safety Modernization Act is finally coming to local farms and producers. The goal is to reduce outbreaks of food-borne illnesses such as Salmonella or Listeria. We'll find out how it aims to do that and what it might mean for farmers in New Hampshire.