FBI

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Sen. Maggie Hassan said the latest round of news out of Washington only heightens the need for independent investigations into the dismissal of former FBI Director James Comey and Russia’s involvement in the 2016 elections.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

When President Donald Trump dismissed FBI Director James Comey yesterday, critics immediately drew comparisons to an incident during Richard Nixon’s presidency known as the Saturday Night Massacre. That’s when Nixon fired a special prosecutor investigating the Watergate break-in, leading to high-level resignations and a constitutional crisis.

NHPR’s Peter Biello discussed the lessons and limitations of this comparison with Tim Naftali, a professor of history at NYU and former director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library.

security newspaper / Flickr/CC

Following the San Bernadino shooting, the FBI has scrambled to learn as much about the crime as possible. But Apple's refusal to help the bureau unlock one of the shooter's iPhones has stoked the national conversation about the role that tech companies play in national security, and the boundaries of how far law enforcement can probe.

kalavinka via flickr Creative Commons

A case in Wisconsin is testing the limits of the Fifth Amendment in the digital age. In January, the FBI seized 20 terabytes of hard drives from Jeffrey Feldman, a man accused possessing underage pornography – but could only decrypt 20% of it. Until last week, a federal court judge had placed the burden on the defendant to decrypt the rest or face charges of contempt. Last week, his attorney successfully argued an emergency motion to extend that deadline. She claims that asking Feldman to decrypt files that would be used against him in the case is a violation of his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. Declan McCullagh is chief political correspondent and senior writer for C-Net and has been following the story.

Enemies: A History of the FBI

May 23, 2012

Recently CNET reported that the FBI had been lobbying congress for a law that would require social networking companies and other web-based communication systems to make sure their systems are surveillance-compatible. FBI director Robert Mueller seemed to confirm that in an appearance last week before the senate judiciary committee.