films

epSos.de via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/dTUAhR

It’s presented as the be-all end- all metric by economists, politicians, and newscasters, but what exactly is GDP? 

On today’s show, the surprisingly fascinating process of measuring gross domestic product, and what this all important economic indicator overlooks.

Plus, the non-profit “Mars One” received over 200,000 applicants for its one way mission to Mars. A new short documentary follows three of the candidates as they vie for a trip they’ll never return from and a place in the history books.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Sleeper Films Of 2014

Jan 8, 2015
Sara Robertson via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/7TR6o3

The Golden Globes are coming up, the event that will spark moviegoers to re-watch their favorite – now award-winning – films of 2014. But what about the other films of 2014, the ones that didn’t make the cut? We spoke to Amy Diaz about her list of “sleeper” films – films that are not nominated, but that you should pay attention to anyway. From The Babadook to The Obvious Child, Amy gave us some great suggestions about what to watch on a snow day.

Guardians of the Galaxy

Phil Moyer via flickr Creative Commons

When it comes to rigid safeguards against the Ebola virus, New York’s governor says “Better safe than sorry”. But what happens when panic inflates the price of public safety? On today’s show, calculating the cost of over-reaction.

Then, comedian Dana Gould, writer for The Simpsons and a B horror movie aficionado, shares his picks for the best Halloween schlock, including the Vincent Price vehicle, The House on Haunted Hill

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

10.28.14: Ghost Towns

Oct 28, 2014
Nick Kenrick via flickr Creative Commons

From the dusty towns of the old west, to the empty mills of the east, there’s just something about abandoned places and the stories they leave behind. Today’s Word of Mouth is all about ghost towns, from neglected Olympic villages to forgotten websites.

We’ll also hear the story of a small town in northern Maine where the ghost of a sea captain is said to roam.

And we’ll visit a ghost town in North Carolina that hit the jackpot when it was transformed into District 12 from Suzanne Collins dystopian novel, The Hunger Games.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Change The Sound, Change The Mood

Oct 27, 2014
Alexis Gordon via flickr Creative Commons

When we spoke to Joel Beckerman about his new book Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms the Way We Think, Feel, and Buy, we couldn't help but think of the movie trailer. Designed to show only the best parts of a movie, a trailer's job is to convince you to pay the price of admission, and give you a sense of the movie. Movie trailer directors artfully use sound to create a mood in just a few short minutes. So what happens when you change the sound?

finchlake2000 via flickr Creative Commons

Despite having 94,000 miles of coastline and millions of acres of rivers, America imports 91% of its seafood. Today we explore the case for reviving the nation’s local fisheries. And, we’ll stay local with filmmaker Jay Craven, whose film Northern Borders is now on tour in New Hampshire. He tells us about the economics of regional filmmaking. Plus, word craft for fast times: a writing teacher celebrates the beauty and efficacy of writing short. 

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab via Flickr

Today on Word of Mouth, invasive species like Zebra Mussels to Asian Carp, are destroying biodiversity across North America. Or are they? Also, we'll look into China’s push to build a frozen food infrastructure. The number of urban Chinese households with a refrigerator has risen from just 7 percent to 95 percent in a decade. We’ll find out what that means for global climate change.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


When I Walk: Talking with filmmaker Jason DaSilva

Jun 20, 2014
zeevveez via Flickr Creative Commons

On today’s show we talked to documentary filmmaker Jason DaSilva. In 2005 Jason was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. He was only twenty five years old, but had more films and praise under his belt than most twice his age. Two years later, when he was on a beach vacation with his family, his brother caught a moment on tape which changed the course of his life. He fell, and for the first time since his diagnosis, was unable to get up by himself. It was from this painful and significant moment that his most recent film, When I Walk, was born. 

W.W. Norton

Author Andre Dubus III talks about his new book "Dirty Love"

  • A successful professional hopes to win back his wife after proving her infidelity. A bank clerk crowding in on 30 and hoping for a family moves in with her compulsive, demeaning boyfriend.  A bartender who fancies himself a poet cheats on his pregnant wife, and a pretty teenaged girl gets shamed on Youtube and reaches out for the promise of a new future and a new love on Skype. These characters all live in the faded beach towns and leafy suburbs of the New England coast. They are united by their clumsy attempts at connection and are the subjects of four loosely connected novellas in a new book called “Dirty Love” by Andre Dubus III. The national book award-winning author of “House of Sand and Fog” and “Townie” again presents gritty, frustrated lives on the skids of the American dream... NOTE: Andre's reading and book signing at the New England College has been rescheduled to April 16th due to weather.
Larry Darling via flickr Creative Commons

The afternoons are getting darker, the trees are bare, and the furnace is snapping on; it’s November in New England. A time when we shift indoors and enjoy some quiet before the holidays are upon us. It’s also a great time for movies, when the studios trot out their Oscar contenders and the crush of holiday blockbusters have yet to arrive with guns blaring and special effects thrusting. 

Amy Diaz is editor and film critic for The Hippo, she and film consultant and commentator, Garen Daly are with us to talk movies. Specifically what you see between now and Thanksgiving.

via amazon.com

“Yellow Cocktail Music: The Great Gatsby Jazz Recordings”, is a kind of way-back machine for the contemporary songs featured in the new film adaptation of The Great Gatsby. Jay-Z, Will-I-Am, and Beyoncé, are featured on the original soundtrack and this follow-up album imagines what the songs might have sounded like coming out of a Victrola in 1922…with help from the Bryan Ferry Orchestra. Joining us to discuss the album is Baz Luhrmann; the distinctive director, producer, and screenwriter for Romeo and Juliet, Moulin Rouge, among others, including the movie that kicked off the summer blockbuster season – The Great Gatsby.

via bethlehemcolonialtheatre.org

The Colonial Theatre in Bethlehem, New Hampshire, is among the oldest continually running movie theatres in the country, and is currently the only venue for showing independent movies in northern New Hampshire. Now, nearly 100 years after opening its doors, The Colonial may have to stop showing films. Like many indie theaters across the country, The Colonial has to convert to the digital format adopted by the film industry if it wants to show new releases. The theatre recently launched a $10,000 Kickstarter campaign to help pay for and install digital projection equipment. Stephen Dignazio is executive director of The Colonial Theatre and joins us to discuss the campaign.

Is Die Hard A Christmas Movie?

Dec 15, 2012

What doesn't say Christmas like a terrorist plot foiled by Bruce Willis? - Author Kevin Flynn, Die Hard die-hard

To many, any best-of action film list would ring hollow with the exclusion of Die Hard - but each year, as the holiday season approaches, it begins to fly under a different flag:  an admittedly less warm, less traditional Christmas classic.

We hear the words honor, duty and sacrifice a lot around Veteran’s Day – and rightly so. What we rarely hear about are the individual, human stories that lead men and women to pick up the mantle of those powerful words and to fight in America’s name. “Where Soldiers Come From” follows a pack of close friends from Michigan’s icy Upper Peninsula as they transform from small town teenagers to National Guardsmen fighting in Afghanistan.

Check out the trailer for Where Soldiers Come From:

J.D. Salinger famously refused to sell the film rights to The Catcher in the Rye, saying it was "unactable." It's true the subtleties of such great novels can get lost in translation. But I thought I'd take a look at three of my favorite novels that have never made it to the multiplex in wide release. Each of these will transport you to another time and another place.

The Syrian uprising has claimed an estimated 12,000 lives. And since foreign journalists are rarely allowed in, many reports provide little beyond the number of people killed. But behind the numbers are lives. As part of an occasional series on those who have died, NPR's Kelly McEvers has this report.

Bassel Shehadeh started out as an IT major in Syria. But it became clear that what he really wanted to do was make films.

Photo by Andrea Metz, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Now that The Hunger Games has killed off the competition for spring box office, Hollywood is gearing up for summer. We’ll get the Batman finale, a Spiderman re-boot, new animated heroes from Pixar and Disney, and comedies from Will Ferrell, and Adam Sandler.  Garen Daly is film consultant for Zeotrope Media is here to preview of some films that won’t break box office records.

Time now for a home viewing recommendation from NPR's movie critic, Bob Mondello. He's found himself swept up this week by the 70th Anniversary edition boxed set of Casablanca.

By now, you may have heard of Bombino, his album, Agadez was a hot seller on i-tunes and named one of NPR’s 50 favorite albums of 2011. Bombino, whose given name is Omara Moctar, is a guitarist from the Tuareg tribe, African nomads who have been persecuted by the government of Niger, especially, who reportedly fought for Gaddafi in Libya and are now considered rebels by the government of Mali, but their real fidelity is to eking out their lives in the desert

Hollywood is dominated at the moment by the upcoming release of The Hunger Games, the first film adaptation of a phenomenally successful series of young adult novels set in a dystopian, divided America, where teenagers from different regions are pitted against each other for survival.

Still from the movie "Connected."
<a href="http://connectedthefilm.com" target="blank">Connectedthefilm.com</a>

The theme of this year’s New Hampshire Jewish Film Festival is connection. Its films explore connections between cultures, between countries, between the past and the present and more.

Linda Gerson is co-chair of the festival, which is taking place all week at venues in Manchester, Concord and Merrimack. She tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson more about this year’s films.

Some of the films they discuss:

Choreographer Allison Orr assembled dancers neither lithe nor acrobatic but with a distinct grace of their own for her latest project. Allison corralled 16 hulking trucks, and 24 employees from the City of Austin’s Department of Solid Waste to perform The Trash Project on an old airport runway.   

Alexander Payne watches a movie every day — or tries to, anyway. Lately, the writer and director of The Descendants has been busy going to nomination and awards dinners, in advance of Sunday's Oscar night — when the Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay prizes could be his.

With Town Meeting Day set for March, February is when towns hold public meetings about the budget items and warrant articles that will go before voters.

Mont Vernon, in southern New Hampshire, is no exception; its public hearing is tonight. And one of the items drawing the most attention is a request to change the name of a small body of water known as Jew Pond.

Ayesha Kahn, photo courtesy of Caravan Serai

Many Americans view Pakistan one-dimensionally: through archive tapes of street riots, terrorist training camps, or through the eyes of a drone, thousands of feet in the air. A new documentary provides another vision. “Made in Pakistan” follows four young urban, middle class professionals in Lahore – Pakistan’s second largest city.

When Kodak filed for Chapter 11 last week, it appeared that digital photography had put the lens cap on old-school film for good. Maybe not. Consider Polaroid: after ceasing production of its iconic Instamatic film in 2009, a group of devoted shutterbugs launched the impossible project. They took control of the company’s manufacturing equipment, and in March of 2010 began selling film.

Photo by Tiny Glimpses via Flickr Creative Commons

The Academy Award nominations were announced this morning with some expected names – Meryl Streep and George Clooney, and a few surprises, Bridesmaids got asked to the party, for example…and who the heck is Demián Bichir?

Wim Wenders On 'Pina': A Dance Documentary In 3-D

Jan 14, 2012

The film Pina is Germany's official entry at the 84th Academy Awards — and a collaboration between two famous Germans of the postwar generation. The filmmaker Wim Wenders captures the groundbreaking modern-dance choreography of the late Pina Bausch, in what many critics are calling a groundbreaking use of 3-D film.

Photo by: Ole A Kjennerud

When this year’s golden globe nominations were announced, 3D, CGI, and IMAX were all bested by a silent, black and white film – The Artist, set in 1927 Hollywood, got more nods than any other nominee. 

(Photo by Saire Elizabeth via Flickr Creative Commons)

The Golden Globe nominations were announced earlier today, with usual suspects Meryl Streep and George Clooney making the grade along with newcomers Rooney Mara and Ryan Gosling getting nods for acting. Award nominations generally have some surprises for Hollywood, but the industry doesn’t always heed the message. As we approach the 2011 best-of-extravaganzas, Word of Mouth is asking two of our favorite movie critics to review some of the things Hollywood has learned.