Financial Aid

Going to College Without Going Deep Into Debt

Aug 24, 2016
romanboed / flickr/cc

As the annual trek back to campus begins, we examine the options available to cover those hefty tuition bills, including new types of loans, grants and new tools for repayment.  We discuss how families navigate the landscape of funding options and government forms.  And we take a look at whether families are having that kitchen-table conversation about the high cost of higher education earlier in the college search process.


Alexander Sun / Flickr/CC

College Scorecard (9:00):

Two years ago, President Obama announced plans for rating colleges and universities, so students would know whether they were getting a good value.  Now, the administration has released its College Scorecard, and students and families are deciding how best to use it.

College Board / https://trends.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/trends-2010-tuition-discounting-institutional-aid-report.pdf

Rising tuition attracts a lot of headlines, but the amount that schools give out in financial aid is also on the rise.  Financial aid can make higher education more accessible to low-income students, but it can also serve as a tool to attract the types of students school want to attract, and to fill seats that might otherwise go empty. Lucy Lapovsky is an education consultant who has studied the question of how much students are actually paying for college and spoke to All Things Considered Host Brady Carlson. 

Weston College / Flickr/CC

We continue our series “A Matter of Degrees” with how families finance higher education.  With the price tag ever-rising, and grants scarce, students are shopping-around and cobbling together a variety of funding approaches.  Often, that includes taking on more debt, but also re-thinking that traditional model of a four-year, on-campus College experience.

GUESTS: