The First Decade: Home & Family

The Architecture & Design Of Affordable Housing

May 18, 2015
"Pruitt-igoeUSGS02" by United States Geological Survey - United States Geological Survey, from their website. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pruitt-igoeUSGS02.jpg#/media/File:Pruitt-igoeUSGS02.j

“We shape our dwellings, and afterwards our dwellings shape us.” Winston Churchill said that in an address to Parliament in 1944, and it remains true today. As part of our station-wide series, “The First Decade,” we’re looking at how the environmental and familial circumstances a child’s first ten years can influence – even determine -- their later lives. Today, housing, neighborhoods and the built environment.  

Researcher: 'Opportunity Gap' Likely To Keep Growing

May 18, 2015
Duboix / Morguefile

New Hampshire has one of the lowest poverty rates in the country, but overall, the gap between the wealthy and the poor is growing. Researchers at the Carsey School of Public Policy in New Hampshire have been looking at the effect this income disparity has on children and their success or failure later in life. Vulnerable Families Research Associate Andrew Schaefer spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

The First Decade: N.H. Family Demographics

May 18, 2015
Emma Fierberg / Flickr Creative Commons

The Granite State has one of the lowest childhood poverty rates in the nation. But behind that rosy figure is a widening gap between children who have and those who have not. As we kick off our series “The First Decade” we’ll look at the causes, effects, and potential solutions for families struggling in New Hampshire.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

There are many factors that affect the way a family with children lives. We've selected ten of these - factors which affect income, access to resources, and stability - and combined them to illustrate how families are doing at either end of the income spectrum.
 
This graphic illustrates how the top 25% and bottom 25% compare, and how the bottom 25% compares with the average of all New Hampshire families. 

Notes on the data:

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

For 32-year-old Melissa Vierra, paying the bills with two kids - 19 months and 10 -  is an equation that seems to never add up.

“If I sat down and figured out my monthly bills, just the straight you know rent, car payment, car insurance, not talking groceries, gas, clothes toiletries, I was about 500 dollars short every month,” she said.