Fishing

Momma of 3 Beauties / Morguefile

Two loons have died in New Hampshire this summer from ingesting lead fishing tackle. This comes after the state strengthened a law earlier in the season to restrict lead fishing gear.

New Hampshire Fish and Game reports that the two birds died in lakes near Lempster and Stoddard. Metal jigs and fishing line were found inside the loons' gizzards, and lab tests showed fatal amounts of lead in their blood.

File Photo

New rules that took effect last month shift the costs of at-sea monitoring to local fisherman.

Critics say these new fees threaten the very existence of New Hampshire’s dwindling fishing industry and will put people out of business. There’s now a lawsuit pending on the issue.

Jeff Feingold, editor of the New Hampshire Business Review, joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the issue.

Photo Courtesy UNH

New Hampshire's senators are supporting fishermen in their fight against federal regulations that shift at-sea monitoring costs to them.

Fishermen of New England species such as cod and haddock must pay the cost of fishing monitors under rules that took effect Tuesday. The monitors collect data to help determine future fishing quotas and can cost several hundred dollars per day. Many fishermen say they can't afford the new cost and some say they will likely go out of business.

Senator Kelly Ayotte agrees the costs have to be covered now or people will be out of business.

Federal fishing regulators say they have notified some New England fishermen that they will have to pay the cost of at-sea monitors starting March 1. 

Monitors collect data to help determine future fishing quotas and their services can cost more than $700 per day. Fishermen of important commercial species such as cod and haddock will have to start paying the cost of the monitors under new rules.

File Photo

A judge has denied a request from East Coast fishermen to stop the federal government's plan to hand them the cost of at-sea monitoring.

Fishermen of New England food species such as cod and haddock will have to start paying the cost of at-sea monitors March 1 under new rules. Monitors collect data to help determine future fishing quotas and can cost about $800 per day.

greateratlantic.fisheries.noaa.gov

 

A federal agency says new fishermen costs have been pushed back a month.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said over the summer that fishermen would have to begin paying about $700 a day for nearly a quarter of their fishing days beginning on Nov. 1. That money would pay for the at-sea monitoring of fishermen, which is currently covered by the agency.

The Portsmouth Herald reports a spokeswoman says the deadline has now been postponed to Dec. 1.

Fishermen have said the costs are too high, as they don't gross $700 in a single day.

via New Hampshire Fish and Game website

New Hampshire Fish and Game is now selling combined lifetime hunting and fishing licenses for newborns.

The licenses can be used once the child is sixteen years old.

Maine and Vermont already offer similar deals. New Hampshire Fish and Game reports it has been getting calls over the past few years asking for them in the Granite State.

drocpsu / Flickr/cc

New Hampshire and New England have been firmly on the local and sustainable food bandwagon for years now, and although Granite Staters are also enthusiastic consumers of seafood, it hasn't been until recently that some in the state have tried to bring that local sensibility to the fish they eat.

Fish And Game's Glenn Normandeau

May 11, 2015
Kevin Micalizzi / Flickr/CC

Fish and Game Executive Director joins us to discuss his agency's mission, its 150th anniversary, and its wildlife management planning process - including decisions around hunting permits and fishing catch limits.

 

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department is holding a public hearing in Portsmouth on proposed fishing rules on April 7.

The proposed rule changes include requiring any Atlantic cod taken from tidal waters to be immediately released; changing size and possession limits for haddock; and requiring new buoy line requirements for lobster traps and hauling times.

The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. at the Urban Forestry Center.

Daryl Carlson/KamaraImage.com

Every sportsman knows that the best way to catch prey is to use the right bait.

So when the Meredith Rotary Club wanted to raise funds with an ice fishing charity competition years ago, the members chose the best bait they could imagine: money.

“We really believed that was the key to having so much interest in our event,” recalled John Sherman, a current Rotarian who helped start the Great Meredith Rotary Fishing Derby back in 1979. “We offered what was, back then, a lot of prize money.”

Flickr

State officials are warning ice conditions are more dangerous than they appear.

After an unseasonably warm December, a hard frost has settled over New Hampshire, coating many ponds and lakes with a layer of ice. That ice may look solid, but in many cases it’s not nearly thick enough for ice fishing or snow mobiles.

Kevin Jordan with Fish and Game says to hike or fish safely you need four to six inches of solid ice, and for snowmobiling you need eight to ten inches.

Busting Ice Fishing Myths With The Fish Nerds

Dec 23, 2014
Word of Mouth

Think ice fishing is old fashioned? Think again! The Fish Nerds are here to tell you that modern ice fishing in New Hampshire incorporates technology, all of the creature comforts you could ever want and a generous helping of fun and camaraderie.

Listen to their conversation, with Virginia, below.

Well, it sure doesn’t have to be. Bob houses and fishing huts can accommodate a heater large enough to keep you warm while you wait for the fish to bite. Dave and Clay told us about a guy who puts a hot tub next to his bob house and stays nice and toasty all season long.

The Ferguson decision, Eric Garner protests, and immigration are all topics we avoid at the holiday table, but opinions run free on Facebook. On today’s show what do you do when your Facebook friends make racist posts?

Plus, think ice fishing is for people who like to drink and dislike their families? The fishing nerds say the times they have-a-changed…

Also today, bad taste among the British; we’ll review the UK traditions of really bad Christmas number ones.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

New Hampshire's Fish and Game Department says changes have been made to rules for catching smelt, striped bass, white perch, haddock and cod for 2015.

Daily limits have been reduced for smelt to accommodate a decline and striped bass to comply with a fishery management plan.

The daily limit of 25 white perch for coastal waters now matches the limit for inland waters.

Min Lee via Flickr CC

New Hampshire health, environment and wildlife officials are holding a public meeting on shellfish rules for 2015.

The information session set for Tuesday night in Portsmouth will be an opportunity for the public to hear about a dye tracking study that traced effluent flows from the Pierce Island wastewater treatment facility to Little Harbor and areas of Portsmouth Harbor out to Odiorne Point. Officials say that study indicates that shellfish harvesting in those areas need to be closed.

Amy Quinton, NHPR

For the past several years, two men calling themselves The Fish Nerds have been on a quest to catch and eat all the species of New Hampshire freshwater fish. Their quest is now complete.

Clay Groves and Dave Kellam talked with All Things Considered about what they learned while trying to “Catch-m-All and Eat-m-All.”

How did this all get started?

New Hampshire Fish and Game officials are holding two hearings on a draft plan to distribute $1.1 million in economic relief funds to the state's groundwater fishing industry.

The hearings will be held Monday and Tuesday night at 6 at the Urban Forestry Center in Portsmouth.

Monday's meeting focuses on the commercial groundfish industry and Tuesday's on the for-hire groundfish industry.

finchlake2000 via flickr Creative Commons

Despite having 94,000 miles of coastline and millions of acres of rivers, America imports 91% of its seafood. Today we explore the case for reviving the nation’s local fisheries. And, we’ll stay local with filmmaker Jay Craven, whose film Northern Borders is now on tour in New Hampshire. He tells us about the economics of regional filmmaking. Plus, word craft for fast times: a writing teacher celebrates the beauty and efficacy of writing short. 

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Untitled
Gregory Heinrichs / Flickr Creative Commons

The New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game is asking anglers fishing in the Squam Lakes to immediately release any largemouth and smallmouth bass that were radio-tagged as part of a state study.   The bass will have a thin wire protruding from their underside and a yellow numbered tag near their dorsal fin.   The goal of the three-year study is to determine the percentage of bass returning to Big Squam Lake after being lake and weighed in and released in Little Squam Lake, and how long it takes them.

Sarah VanHorn, Manager of NH Community Seafood / N.H. Sea Grant

This is the second year for a New Hampshire program that brings the farm share model to fish.

It’s called New Hampshire Community Seafood, and it was the subject of a recent column by David Brooks, who writes the weekly Granite Geek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and Granite Geek.org. He joined us on All Things Considered to talk about the program.

Clouser Minnows
pacres / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire Fish and Game and the Division of Parks and Recreation are offering two free fly-fishing workshops in the North Country.   Officials urge interested anglers to register soon, as these workshops fill up fast.   A two-day workshop will take place June 7-8 at Coleman State Park in Stewartstown.  A second workshop is offered by the Haverhill Recreation Department June 28-29.   The workshops are open to anglers age 13 and up, although those 13-16 must be accompanied by an adult.

Striped bass are starting to arrive in New Hampshire's coastal waters, and the state wants to figure out how many are out there.  To help state and federal fisheries biologists assess the status of the population, the state Fish and Game Department is asking anglers to participate in an online survey.  Participants are asked to measure each striped bass they catch. The survey is the only method the department currently has to get length measurements on fish that are released.  There's been a survey since 1993.  It can be found at http://www.fishnh.com/marine/striper_survey.html .     

After a brief delay, New Hampshire Fish and Game department trucks have been heading out to stock the state's lakes and ponds with trout.  Saturday is opening day for the state's designated trout ponds. Fish stocking generally occurs from mid-March to early July, but it didn't start until the last days of March this year because spring conditions were slow to arrive.  Inland Fisheries Chief Jason Smith says with cold, high waters from melting snow, it will be a few weeks before rivers and streams are at "fishable'' levels.

Funding Fish And Game

Apr 2, 2014
kittynh / Flickr/CC

This agency does much more than serve hunters and anglers, it’s also involved in search and rescue, land conservation, and habitat management.  Despite all these responsibilities, hunting and fishing license fees are the main revenue source. Now, some in the Statehouse are taking hard look expanding that base - to hikers, canoers, and the many others who enjoy the great outdoors.

GUESTS:

N.H. Joins Lawsuit Aimed At Blocking Fishing Regulations

Sep 16, 2013

New Hampshire is joining a lawsuit arguing that new federal rules will devastate New England's groundfishing industry.

Gov. Maggie Hassan and Attorney General Joseph Foster said Monday that New Hampshire has joined a lawsuit Massachusetts filed against fishing regulators in May seeking to block the rules.

In a new book, UNH professor Jeffrey Bolster argues the North Atlantic, for all its vastness and power, is deeply vulnerable.and has suffered cycles of over fishing for centuries, with each new method of fishing causing stocks to decline. We’ll look back at this history and what it might teach us about restoring our oceans to health.

Guest

W. Jeffrey Bolster - UNH Professor and author of the new book "The Mortal Sea: Fishing the Atlantic in the Age of Sail"

Todd Bookman / NHPR

  

This was no place for marching bands, pep rallies or cheerleaders. Fifty four teams, each composed of two students, met on the dark waters of Lake Winnipesaukee under threatening skies.

“I’ve got a spinning rod set up, I’m going to be fishing mostly spinners,” says Campbell High School Junior Connor Perry. “My other teammate is going to be fishing mostly some worms. See what works out today, got to see what they want.”  

Captain Kimo via Flickr Creative Commons

NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown found that the traditional ice-fishing bob-houses that pop up each winter may be on their way out. Earlier this month, Sam caught up with Dave Genz—the man credited as the “Godfather of modern ice fishing” and the only ice-angler to be named to America’s fresh water fishing hall of fame—as he fished and demonstrated and some of the newer innovations to the winter sport.

The Mortal Sea

Nov 30, 2012

In a new book, UNH professor Jeffrey Bolster argues the North Atlantic, for all its vastness and power, is deeply vulnerable.and has suffered cycles of over fishing for centuries, with each new method of fishing causing stocks to decline.  We’ll look back at this history…and what it might teach us about restoring our oceans to health.

Guest

W. Jeffrey Bolster - UNH Professor and author of the new book "The Mortal Sea: Fishing the Atlantic in the Age of Sail""

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