Fitness & Nutrition

Scrutinizing Supplements: The Hype And The Hope

Aug 10, 2015
Clean Wal-Mart / Flickr/cc

Millions of Americans swear by them, from the daily multivitamin to herbal remedies claiming to cure various ailments. And while some supplements have solid science behind them, others have been questioned by research. Meanwhile, recent reports have found that some products don’t contain the ingredients listed on their labels.

Nottingham Trent University via flickr Creative Commons /

Sports nutrition is a multi-billion dollar market, but a new study from the University Of Montana is calling so-called recovery foods into question. On today’s show we’ll look at the evidence on whether post-workout energy food and drinks any better for you than fast food.

Then, doctors typically diagnose diseases with blood tests, x-rays, scans, pokes and prods. Later in the show we’ll look at a powerful and prevalent diagnostic tool that’s been used to identify diseases for centuries: the nose.


The ubiquity of smartphones and tablets and a certain level of self-absorption have led to a number of apps and programs that track sleep, diet, heart rate, baby weight, twitter use, mood, sweat, caffeine, memories and bowel movements. Welcome to the age of the quantified self, but with a thousand ways to keep tabs on your own life, how then, do you keep track of all the trackers?

Sarah Kessler is associate editor for Fast Company. She wrote about how developers creating tracking apps that track other tracking apps.

Food, as we so often note on this blog, means a lot of different things to different people. To Olympic athletes, food is fuel for exceptional athletic performance. But there's a surprising amount of variety in just how much fuel elite athletes need.

Anyone who followed Michael Phelps' astonishing performance in the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games surely will remember one of the secrets of his success: Consuming as many as 12,000 calories in a day.