Food

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  Hippo Editor Amy Diaz joins Morning Edition to discuss some of the activities in store for the hot and steamy Valentine's Weekend, which forecasters predict will be anything but hot or steamy.

Lets embrace the cold...

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Over the next few weeks Foodstuffs is going to look at the range of foods we have here in the Granite State - and it may be a wider range of foods than many of us think.

Among winter comfort foods, Susan Laughlin of New Hampshire Magazine has one choice for the ultimate: poutine. She compiled a guide to poutine in New Hampshire and she joined All Things Considered to talk about it.

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If seaweed isn't part of your share of New Hampshire food, it may soon be. At least that's the goal of the “exploration of seaweed” event taking place at Stages at One Washington in Dover.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

For 15 years the Cold Mountain Café in Bethlehem has been a fixture in the North Country.

But when one of its co-owners died, it looked like the café might close.

That is until the owner’s daughter decided to turn to the community for help.

To a large extent Kate Foley grew up in the café her father co-owned, waiting tables and becoming friends with hundreds of customers.

But when she decided she wanted to buy the half of the business owned by her father’s partner she ran into a big challenge.

Money.

Foodstuffs: The Mac And Cheese Bake-Off Is Coming

Jan 15, 2015
Ted Murphy via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/Hoz3v

In cold weather we turn to comfort food, and there are few foods more comforting than mac and cheese.

This winter favorite is becoming increasingly versatile, as is evident from the many entries in the New Hampshire’s Own Macaroni and Cheese Bake Off, which takes place Saturday, January 17th, in Concord.

www.unh.edu

While production of certain types of produce is seasonal, demand doesn’t stop when the growing season ends.

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire may have taken a step toward a solution to that dilemma.

In a study, they successfully grew bulbing onions planted in fall for a spring harvest with the aid of low tunnels.

Becky Sideman is a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station.

She joins Morning Edition to talk about her findings.

Miguel O. Strauss via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/89BTbC

Bankrupt orchestras, aging audiences, skyrocketing tuition at conservatories; the death knell for classical music in America is sounding again. On today’s show, a concert cellist offers some tough love for the classical music world.

Then we’ll investigate the condiment that brought down an empire. Among the disturbing parallels between America and the fall of Rome: over reliance on one condiment!

Plus: we’ll sample some of history’s craziest hangover cures. From fried canary to raw eel.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

1.1.15: Happy New Year!

Jan 1, 2015
Thomas via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/96asVp

It’s official: 2015 is here. And with the New Year comes an opportunity for a fresh start. On today’s show, we’ll start 2015 on the right foot. Philosopher and historian Roman Krzanric discovers lessons for living a richer, more satisfying modern life, by looking for examples in the past. Plus, an inside look at the 11-billion-dollar self-help industry. We’ll talk to a writer who attended workshops, conferences and visualized success – all to better understand America’s fixation with self-improvement.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Jeremy Brooks via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/7s2JX9

The image of the family gathered at the table for the evening meal is a durable American tradition. Only it’s a myth. On today’s show, a food historian describes how most families ate for most of American history.

Plus, researchers at Cornell offer tips on how to navigate the all you can eat buffet without gaining a pound.

Then, we move from food to booze: hard drinking writers, like Ernest Hemingway and John Cheever fortified the myth of the alcohol-soaked genius. An author who explores why writers drink, and dispels any myths about booze as muse.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Giving Matters: Helping Elderly Residents Stock The Cupboard

Dec 13, 2014

The CareGivers  is dedicated to helping elders stay in their homes, and provides services that help them do so. Elsie relies on the CareGivers for help grocery shopping and getting to appointments. And each month, she welcomes a volunteer from the CareGivers Caring Cupboard food pantry.

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

Last week, a GOP staffer resigned after posting a Facebook comment criticizing the President's daughters. Today on Word of Mouth, the history of an unlikely American tradition: publicly judging the children of the White House. Also, the hidden dangers of public Wi-Fi, and the industry secret behind orange juice’s robust flavor.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

This is a time of year when food banks and aid groups are looking for ways to encourage people to donate food and money to help the hungry.

The Portsmouth Public Library is offering its patrons a deal: donate food to the Seacoast Family Food Pantry and they’ll forgive some overdue fines.

Internet Archive via flickr Creative Commons

Thanksgiving leftovers in my kitchen include Chinese chestnut-stuffing. Most people know that our American chestnut trees were decimated by an Asian fungus detected in 1904 that killed untold billions of trees and wiped-out one of the most common and most important lumber and wildlife trees from eastern forests before 1940.

RoadSidePictures via flickr Creative Commons

When Thanksgiving rolls around every year, do you stick to the script, or do you like to experiment to make the feast a little more memorable? With the big day looming, J.M. Hirsch joined Taylor in studio to talk about some new ways to cook the time honored tradition of roast turkey plus, ways to satisfy all of your guests without too much extra effort.

If you've got some great tips for making Thanksgiving great, let us know in the comments or join the conversation on our Facebook page. Bon appétit!

Turkey: Steve Voght Snowy Scence: ingrid eulenfan / via flickr Creative Commons

For many, Thanksgiving is a time to pull out those tried-and-true family recipes, but why not try something new this year? On today’s show,  new approaches to thanksgiving dinner, from dry brining your turkey to spatchcocking 101. And our series Good Gig, conversations with people who have landed their dream job, continues with a professional photographer who has captured the live performances of everyone from Herbie Hancock to Tony Bennett. Plus, a look at efforts to bring an endangered Native American language back from the brink.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Jocelyn & Cathy via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/EeQ62

Yankee Magazine recently released the winners of its 2014 Editors Choice Food Awards. One of the New Hampshire honorees caught our attention: Moochie’s Macarons of Nashua.

Rob Friesel via Flickr CC

The Vermont Attorney General's office has released a draft of the rules it is writing to govern the state's first-in-the-nation law to require the labeling of food made with genetically modified organisms.

The nine pages of rules released Wednesday lay out everything from definitions of "food" and "genetic engineering" to the required disclosures on packaging that will read "Produced with Genetic Engineering."

Giving Matters: Breaking The Cycle Of Food Insecurity

Oct 4, 2014
Courtesy Niall Kennedy via Flickr/Creative Commons.

The work of the New Hampshire Food Bank is well established in the state, providing millions of pounds of food every year to food pantries and soup kitchens north and south. Less well-known, perhaps, are the programs it has developed that address the causes of hunger -- helping people get training that leads to employment and to food security.
 

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It’s apple season, and one of the most enjoyable ways to partake is the apple cider doughnut.

Amy Traverso is senior lifestyle editor at Yankee Magazine and author of The Apple Lover’s Cookbook.

She tells says even though New Hampshire has plenty of great cider doughnuts for sale, everyone should try making a batch at home at least once.

Howard G Charing via flickr Creative Commons

If your last vacation took you to a tropical island or a snow capped mountain, you might find the very idea of traveling to another country in order to try native hallucinogens a little bizarre. On today's show we'll talk to a writer who traveled to Peru to investigate the growing trend of 'Drug Tourism' for herself. Also, a craftsman talks about why making things matters. Plus, the origins of graham crackers might have you looking at your afternoon snack a little differently.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Jack Rodolico

New immigrants often face an unexpected challenge: how to navigate away from an American diet that takes a toll on your health? That’s becoming easier in New Hampshire due to a network of markets and farms that carry familiar foods for the state’s foreign residents.

New Hampshire is home to a small but growing immigrant population; about one in 20 Granite Staters are foreign born. And there’s an experience that unites many of them: that bewildering first visit to an American grocery store.

anotherlunch.com via Flickr CC

  While me may not remember classmates’ names, or the books we read, there’s something about school lunch that stays with us long after graduation. Today, Word of Mouth investigates the content of children’s brown bag lunches, and discovers they’re not always healthier than cafeteria fare.  Then: a growing number of young Americans are lowering their vocal registers. We’ll look at the speech pattern known as vocal fry, and find out why women who speak with a creak have worse job prospects than their higher-register peers.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Michael Samuels

Basil has been one of the big draws all summer at Dimond Hill Farm in Concord. 

“We give a sprig away for every customer who buys something,” says Yianna Coliandris, who works at the farmstand.

“Everyone was enjoying that, and it was absolutely thriving. It was beautiful, beautiful basil, and it tasted and smelled absolutely wonderful.”

But now customers will have to find basil elsewhere.

“This was the basil,” says Jane Presby, surveying a tenth of an acre of empty soil.

USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab via Flickr

Today on Word of Mouth, invasive species like Zebra Mussels to Asian Carp, are destroying biodiversity across North America. Or are they? Also, we'll look into China’s push to build a frozen food infrastructure. The number of urban Chinese households with a refrigerator has risen from just 7 percent to 95 percent in a decade. We’ll find out what that means for global climate change.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Ale Viyie via Flickr Creative Commons

For years, Market Basket has called itself the store where you get more for your dollar.

And those longtime customers who are currently boycotting the chain over the firing of longtime CEO Arthur T. Demoulas say they’re spending more on groceries as they’re patronizing other stores.

Those worried about their grocery budgets might pick up a few tips from Erik August Johnson.

vixyao via Flickr CC

New Hampshire bills itself as having a terrain for all seasons – the mountains offer climbing and skiing, the forests shelter innumerable hiking trails, and the lakes and rivers draw people in summer and winter alike. We speak with Lucie Bryar about some the state’s best spots for exploring. And, casual dining chains have been experimenting in extreme discounts. We take a look at the logic behind it and speak with one reporter who put these policies to the test. Then, in case you’ve run out of vacation ideas, we have a list of America’s ickiest attractions.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


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The world of crowdfunding is awash in potato salad, thanks to a spud enthusiast in Ohio called Zack Danger Brown. Promising only that, upon raising ten dollars, he was going to make potato salad – “I haven't decided what kind yet” – Brown raised nearly $50,000 in two weeks on Kickstarter. (The total was well over $70,000 before Kickstarter cancelled several donations it said couldn’t be verified.)

Wacky Grilling Recipes From J.M. Hirsch

Jul 10, 2014
Chris Makarsky via Flickr Creative Commons

Recently, we talked to J.M. Hirsch, food editor for the Associated Press and author of Beating The Lunchbox Blues about his wacky grilling habit. He was kind enough to send us a couple of his recipes and told us a few more on air.

woodleywonderworks via Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been 25 years since Larry David’s “show-about-nothing” debuted on NBC, but it lives on. Recently a critic made the argument that Seinfeld not only transformed the sitcom but paved the way for television’s anti-hero dramas. Plus, not even a month into summer, you may already be approaching capacity on grilled burgers and hot dogs. JM Hirsch, food editor for the Associated Press joins us to inject new ideas into the outdoor cooking season. And, a sneak peak of bands heading to western Massachusetts for this weekend’s Green River Festival.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


A food market can be a cultural center for a neighborhood. The owner of an Asian market in Manchester is hoping to become just that, but first he must find a new space for his store. To learn more about the Saigon Asian Market we turned to Mark Hayward of the Union Leader who has written about the market’s struggle with the Manchester Zoning Board of Adjustment:

What can you tell us about this store and about its owner?

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