Foreign Policy

Matt Kieffer via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/ywYaFj

Some 2000 years ago, Roman philosopher and acclaimed public speaker Cicero outlined the ideal orator: a gentle speaker who uses logic, character, and emotion to persuade an audience.  So what would Cicero think of tonight's debaters: Clinton and Trump? Today, 2016 rhetoric through the eyes of an ancient.

Plus, some police departments respond to charges of racially motivated killings by recruiting more minority officers...except for one demographic that could make a measurable difference: women.

A Nation Engaged: America's Role in The World

Aug 29, 2016
U.S. Pacific Fleet via Flickr/Creative Commons

We take part in a national conversation as part of the NPR series, A Nation Engaged: America's Role in the World. We explore how the U.S. should wield its diplomatic influence and military might.  It's a topic both major candidates have addressed, offering different visions for foreign policy. We'll look at those and consider what challenges the next President is likely deal with on the world stage. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup - August 12, 2016

Aug 12, 2016

After visiting the state, Donald Trump continues to stir up controversy for himself and for Republicans in downticket races, including Senator Kelly Ayotte.  In the race for U.S. Senate, Governor Maggie Hassan lays out her goals for keeping New Hampshire and the country safe in a foreign policy address.  And the state's fourth medical marijuana dispensary opens for business in Merrimack.  


Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin

Feb 23, 2016
majjed2008 / Flickr/CC

While many observers see Vladimir Putin as a 'man from nowhere' without a face, substance, or soul, our guest today argues that he has had a number of personas over time. His public relations team has pitched him as everything from 'outsider' to 'history man' to suit the historical moment. Understanding these personalties, she argues, is key to making policy decisions about Russia.

Guest:

Primary 2016: Foreign Policy on the Campaign Trail

Oct 29, 2015
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're looking at what the candidates are saying about America’s role in the world: how to deal with terrorism and handle the numerous conflicts in the Middle East, what to do about fraught relations with Russia, China and North Korea, and how best to respond to the refugee crisis in Europe and conduct trade in the global area.

GUESTS:

This primary season, NHPR is taking a closer look at some of the issues defining the presidential primary races through a series we’re calling Where They Stand. Today we’re looking at some of the top foreign policy questions in the Republican primary.

On this subject, while the candidates agree on most issues, there are still differences to be found.

Phil Roeder via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/vMxFAe

Earlier this year, an aspiring Czech politician traveled to a piece of disputed land wedged between Serbia and Croatia , stuck a flag in the earth and declared it a new country. Today we explore one man’s dream to create a libertarian utopia on 3-square miles of mosquito-infested marshland. Plus, the story of a lost thrill-seeker from Baltimore who crossed the Middle-East by motorcycle, joined the Libyan revolution, and captured it all on film. Plus, a tale of Cold War corn diplomacy. 

U.S. Weighs Options as ISIS Makes Gains in Iraq

Jun 17, 2015
DVIDSHUB / Flickr / Creative Commons

The militant group ISIS continues to make gains in Iraq, taking several major cities, despite U.S. air strikes. That’s prompted heated debate over what this country should do next.  We’ll look into the options now under consideration, including President Obama’s plan to ramp up military assistance there.

Iraq War Veterans: Stories From The Homefront

May 25, 2015
Kansas City Public Library / Flickr/CC

We're talking with Pulitzer Prize winning Washington Post reporter David Finkel about his work covering the lives of Iraq War veterans -- their experiences in war and returning home, where they often face what Finkel calls the "after-war."

The Future Of U.S.-Cuba Relations

Apr 21, 2015
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

The thaw that began last year has developed into a warm spell, with a historic sit-down at the Summit of the Americas, removal of Cuba from the terrorism list, and movement toward reopening embassies. We’re sitting down with Cuba expert Peter Kornbluh, on these events and some of the concerns that have come up.

Walt Otto / Flickr//cc

More than ten years after the U.S. invasion of Iraq, the issue still dominates American foreign policy. We’ll speak with Retired Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, who was there from the beginning, serving as chief of staff to then Secretary of State Colin Powell. We’ll get his thoughts on the factors influencing American decision making in Iraq, including money.

U.S.-Iran Relations And The Nuclear Negotiations

Feb 24, 2015
U.S. Department of State / Flickr/CC

After years of diplomatic false-starts, a deal over Iran’s nuclear program may finally be in sight. But as negotiators race to reach agreement by the end of March deadline, domestic politics, international relations, and a long history of mistrust threaten to derail what many see as a last best chance for a diplomatic solution.

GUESTS:

Karim Kadim / AP via NPR

A powerful group of radical Islamists has been overwhelming Iraqi cities and towns. The stunning onslaught has the capital Baghdad now girding for battle and the U.S. grappling with how best to deal with the threat. We’ll look at the situation there and at American options.

GUESTS:

All Eyes On India, And Its New Prime Minister

Jun 2, 2014
Two Circles / Flickr/CC

Home to a sixth of the world’s population and the third largest economy, India is certainly not a force to be ignored. With a GDP  beyond the size of Japan’s, and a  population getting close to China’s. At this magnitude, India’s economic problems are on a huge scale as well: a per capita income of two thousand dollars a year, a stubbornly sluggish growth rate, inflation almost at ten percent, and more than three hundred million people living in poverty.

What Happened To The "Arab Spring," And What's Next

May 13, 2014
Hossam el-Hamalawy / Flickr/CC

Three years after what was dubbed the “Arab Spring”, Egypt is preparing for its first election since a military coup last summer. The candidate presumed to win is Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, who led the coup against Islamist President Morsi last July.  Since then, he’s been the de facto leader of Egypt, and has engineered mass crackdowns on dissent. It’s not the type of reform many imagined, when the fabled Tahrir Square uprisings began – and now, Egyptians are wondering if their revolution has left them any better off than before.

UN Photo/ Tim Page / Flickr/CC

The results of this weekend’s elections, many say, will have enormous consequences for the country’s future - from the status of ongoing U.S. military support, to whether recent civil rights gains are maintained.  But the balloting has been marred by violence, and deep-seated concerns about fraud.

GUESTS:

poniblog / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. ties with Russia have always been complicated, but recently they have heated up even more. Disputes over how to approach the war in Syria, Russia’s protection of NSA leaker Edward Snowden, as well as the recent tug of war over Ukraine have all contributed to this tension. We’re examining this fraught relationship and how it’s changed. 

GUESTS:

jmawork / Flickr Creative Commons

The administration wants  to “pivot east” - to move away from Europe and the Middle East and more towards Japan, South Korea, and especially China - given its economic and military power.

GUESTS:

  • Kathleen Molony – director and executive committee member of the Fellows Program at Harvard University's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. She was formerly the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Office of International Trade.

An Opening In Iran?

Sep 30, 2013
757Live / Flickr Creative Commons

After more than three decades of tension and distrust, a new President and his charm offensive have caused hopes for better relations. But skepticism remains… about what Iran’s intentions are – and how other actors like Syria and Israel could play a role.

GUESTS:

Bill Martel, professor at the Fletcher School at Tufts University. His most recent book is called "Victory in War"

New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte says she's skeptical of the credibility of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Syrian President Bashar Assad and the ability of the United Nations to execute a plan for Syria to relinquish its chemical weapons.

But Ayotte, commenting after President Barack Obama addressed the nation Tuesday night, said if the effort is successful, the world would be safer.

As unrest continues in Egypt, we'll get the thoughts of Granite Staters with an affiliation to the country. We’ll get their thoughts about the recent unrest in that country after the army ousted President Mohammed Morsi last month.  We’ll find out what they’re hearing from friends and family in Egypt and hear their hopes and concerns for the country’s future, including its relations with the U.S.

Guests:

Protests against the Prime Minister Erdogan continue this week after a violent crackdown sparked national protests. While some point to the Arab Spring as a comparison, a secular Turkey is its own special case. We’ll look at what’s happening in the region, and implication for American foreign policy.

Guests

As the U.S. emerges from a decade of war and a Great Recession, defense expert and former Reagan Pentagon official Lawrence Korb says we can and should cut our military spending. We’ll get his ideas on how to do so as the country faces evolving threats, including nuclear proliferation, cyber-attacks, and new faces of terrorism. Today we talk to Lawrence Korb about how he says you do national security and foreign policy on a budget.

Guest

This week, U.S. concerns over the civil war in Syria escalated with talk of chemical weapons and the real fear that the conflict could spill over in the broader Middle East including Israel.  Now there’s debate in Washington about how this country should respond what the so-called “red-line is” and whether the Americans public is willing to cross it. 

Guests

In March of 2003, the U.S. began air strikes in what officials said would be a short war. Eight years later, our forces pulled out with a death toll of more than 4000 Americans and 100,000 Iraqis.  We’ll talk with Granite Staters who served in Iraq, what they experienced and their reflections a decade later.

Guests:

As the U.S. emerges from a decade of war and a Great Recession, defense expert and former Reagan Pentagon official Lawrence Korb says we can and should cut our military spending. We’ll get his ideas on how to do so as the country faces evolving threats, including nuclear proliferation, cyber-attacks, and new faces of terrorism. Today we talk to Lawrence Korb about how he says you do national security and foreign policy on a budget.

Guest

Agence France-Presse

More than twenty years after the end of the Cold War, the nuclear solution continues its powerful grip on geopolitics. From North Korea’s confrontational nuclear testing and long-range rocket launches to the coming nuclear crisis in Iran, nukes are the currency of power, signifying prestige and influence on the world stage.

In two-thousand-eight, Iraq and Afghanistan were still the major focus, but as those conflicts wind down, other hotspots are emerging…from Syria to North Korea to Iran to Al Qaeda in Northern Africa.  We’ll examine these new foreign policy challenges and how they may play out over the next four years.

Guests:

For weeks, Israelis and Palestinians in Gaza have traded rocket fire and air-strikes, and now, even though there’s currently a cease-fire, relations are still tense. We’ll talk with New Hampshire residents connected to both sides in this conflic and get their thoughts and what they’re hearing from friends and family in the region.

 

Guests

The China Challenge

Nov 14, 2012

As the world’s second largest economy and the largest foreign holder of American debt, China’s future is intertwined with ours -- even as we differ on many issues, such as trade and human rights. These differences made for intense campaign fodder in the Presidential race, with tough talk from candidates about the US-China relationship.  Meanwhile, China is undergoing its own change in leadership. Today we look at the complicated relationship between China and the US.

Guests

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