full-day kindergarten

On this episode: The lottery game keno heads to individual cities for approval by voters. Supporters hope it will boost local economies, while critics worry about gambling. And later in the show, Senator Jeb Bradley updates us on efforts to improve Medicaid Expansion. 


Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The electronic gambling game Keno is now legal in New Hampshire, but that doesn’t mean cities and towns have to allow it. Towns will debate that in March. Right now, cities are considering whether to put Keno on the ballot for their November elections.

This is where Charlie McIntyre comes in.

FILE

Manchester aldermen will consider whether to ban smoking from city parks on Tuesday. They’ll also debate whether to put a question to allow Keno in the city on November’s ballot.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 14, 2017

Jul 14, 2017

New Hampshire's Attorney General opens a criminal investigation into charges of sexual assault at St. Paul's School. Governor Chris Sununu signed a number of bills, including full-day kindergarten funding, a drug interdiction bill, and another tightening the definition of domicile for voting purposes. He also vetoed his first bill, regarding zoning board procedures.  And Grover Norquist, of Americans for Tax Reform, visits the state to talk tax reform and support GOP congressional candidates.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu is heading to an elementary school to sign a bill that achieves one of his top priorities: state funding for full-day kindergarten.

Sununu, a Republican, initially proposed an $18 million-per-year, need-based grant system that would've funded programs for districts with a lot of low-income families but wouldn't have covered the full costs elsewhere. Lawmakers instead approved partial funding and the use of the keno lottery game to pay for it.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 30th, 2017

Jun 30, 2017

Governor Sununu and other New Hampshire lawmakers announced their opposition to the proposed healthcare bill from the U.S. Senate.  "Keno-garten" comes to the Granite State, but critics worry the new funding from the electronic gambling game Keno won't be enough for widespread full-day kindergarten programs. And Mayor Ted Gatsas of Manchester announces his re-election campaign, amongst some controversy. 


Last week, lawmakers in Concord signed off on a plan to provide state support for full-day kindergarten in New Hampshire. The new law will use revenue from the electronic gambling game keno to give school districts more money for full-day kindergarten.

NHPR reporter Jason Moon recently sat down with NHPR host Sally Hirsch-Dickinson to talk about what this mean for schools and town across New Hampshire. Listen to their conversation here.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 23, 2017

Jun 23, 2017

Catch up on this week's stop N.H. stories:  The New Hampshire House and Senate pass an $11.7 billion budget. Despite a Republican majority, GOP leaders had to work hard to pass this spending plan, but it's now on its way to the Governor's desk.  Another fraught issue for both sides of the aisle: a bill funding full-day kindergarten.  And more than 80 Great Dane dogs were rescued from a puppy mill operating out of a mansion in Wolfeboro.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

After a lengthy debate in both the House and the Senate, the full legislature passed a bill Thursday that funds full-day kindergarten by legalizing the electronic bingo game Keno.

C. Hanchey via Flickr CC.

The city of Nashua will now offer full-day kindergarten at all of its elementary schools. That decision comes as lawmakers in Concord decide whether to support full-day kindergarten state-wide.

Nashua joins the roughly three quarters of school districts around the state that offer full-day kindergarten programs.

Districts who offer full-day programs, do so without support from the state.

But interim superintendent of Nashua Schools Connie Brown says with an overall decline in enrollment, they will be able to implement the program at no cost.

On Thursday, a proposal to spend state money on full-day kindergarten heads to a final vote.

The bill, which pays for additional state spending on kindergarten by taxing keno, is making for tough decisions on both sides of the aisle.

Jason Moon for NHPR

House and Senate lawmakers have settled on the final language for a bill to fund full day kindergarten in New Hampshire. But the bipartisan cooperation around the bill may be faltering.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

When Republicans took full control in Concord this year, they wasted no time outlining an ambitious policy agenda on a number of fronts, including education.

While Republicans were able to accomplish much of that agenda, they weren’t able to get everything they wanted. Here’s a rundown of some major developments in education policy so far this year.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The House overwhelmingly passed a bill Thursday to fund full-day kindergarten in the state. The final vote was 231 to 100.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The House finance committee has given its unanimous backing to a full-day kindergarten proposal tied to the lottery game Keno.

Under the bill, the state would send school districts that have full-day kindergarten an extra $1100 per pupil starting in 2019.

The bill would also authorize cities and towns to allow Keno. The state's take from the video lottery game would be deposited in the state's education trust fund. The account the new Kindergarten aid would be drawn from. Neal Kurk is chairman of the House Finance Committee.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

Budget writers in the N.H. House are eyeing the lottery game Keno as a way to fund full day kindergarten. The state senate has always opposed Keno and Governor Sununu says he's yet to see the details of the plan.

woodleywonderworks via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5p1N5a

A new poll this week conducted by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center asked Granite Staters to weigh in on a number of topics that have been in the news of late.

More than 500 New Hampshire residents were asked for their opinions on everything from full-day kindergarten to marijuana legalization.

UNH Survey Center Director Andy Smith joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the results.

Jason Moon for NHPR

 

It’s a pregnant moment for state education policy. Republicans control Concord, and Gov. Chris Sununu ran on a promise to change how education is delivered here. Key aspects of that debate – full-day kindergarten, broad school choice, and the power of the state education commissioner were all debated Tuesday by lawmakers. But the message was mixed, and decidedly less conservative than last year's election results would suggest.

Woodley Wonderworks via Flickr CC

The Republican-controlled House Education Committee voted 15 to 4 today to offer state support for full-day kindergarten in New Hampshire for the first time.

Under the current state education funding system, kindergartners are counted at half the rate as other grades, so districts get just half the money to educate kindergartners as they do for students in other grades.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 21, 2017

Apr 20, 2017

Governor Sununu pushes his kindergarten plan in the New Hampshire House and makes a change at the State Board of Education.   The State Senate considers legalizing, and taxing , online fantasy sports. St. Paul's graduate Owen Labrie is denied a new trial. And a new reports says our air quality is better than it's been in twenty years.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Tuesday saw Gov. Chris Sununu’s maiden visit to testify before a legislative committee, on a bill to expand full-day kindergarten to more school districts. And from the start, Sununu made it clear he sees the policy as one that could define his time as governor.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Rare is the New Hampshire governor who will admit feeling ashamed of the state. But Chris Sununu’s been doing just that lately, over New Hampshire’s lack of state-supported full-day kindergarten.

“It’s embarrassing. It’s embarrassing. This is the 21st century; this is New Hampshire.”

NHPR Staff

Each week, NHPR Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition's Rick Ganley for On the Political Front, a rundown of the week to come in New Hampshire Politics.


www.harriman.com

  Nashua's Board of Education approved a budget this week that includes full-day kindergarten at all of the city’s schools. Currently, full-day kindergarten is offered at six the city’s twelve elementary schools.

Its expansion has been championed by Jim Donchess, the city’s mayor.

Nashua’s school budget, including funds for full day kindergarten, will now go to the Board of Alderman and then the Board of Education.

About three quarters of towns and cities in New Hampshire offer full day kindergarten.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

House Speaker Shawn Jasper says it shouldn't be a surprise House Republicans aren't backing Gov. Chris Sununu's plan to spend $18 million in the next two-year state budget to fund full-day kindergarten in New Hampshire.

woodleywonderworks via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5p1N5a

A New Hampshire House subcommittee voted Wednesday to eliminate $18 million dollars in kindergarten funding from Gov. Chris Sununu’s state budget proposal. 

Town meeting day is next week and for many communities the item that will be getting the most attention has to do with schools.

NHPR reporter Jason Moon joined All Things Considered Host Peter Biello to talk about what’s on the ballot for schools around the state this year.

The state Senate has passed, and then immediately tables, a bill that would increase state funding for school districts that offer full-day kindergarten programs.

House lawmakers heard testimony Thursday on a proposal to increase state aid for students attending full-day kindergarten programs.

The state currently funds kindergarten programs at half the rate as other grades, even for districts that choose to offer full-day programs. Districts are required to offer at least half-day programs.

Pexels

More than half of New Hampshire districts have full-day kindergarten. Now a new bill would double state aid for this. But some local officials say that wouldn't go nearly far enough. Meanwhile, some lawmakers are unsure whether the state should make this commitment or focus on other issues.


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