Fungus

Via the US Forest Service

A study says that a mutated fungus is infecting white pine forests in parts of New Hampshire.

White pine blister rust comes from a combination of white pines and flowering plants — called ribes — like gooseberries and currants. When infected ribes lose their leaves in the fall, spores of the fungus invade white pines and eventually kill the tree.

A U.S. Forest Service study says the fungus is infecting trees in Epsom and Concord, and possibly elsewhere in the Northeast.

USFWS Headquarters / Flikr Creative Commons

Officials with New Hampshire Fish and Game have confirmed that bats infected with White Nose Syndrome have been detected in Rockingham County for the first time.

White nose was first detected on bats in Rockingham in 2010, but this March was the first time bats were visibly infected with the fungus. Fish and Game biologist Emily Brunkhurst says the disease has devastated bat populations in the Northeast.

Photo by Penn State, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Recently, popular books like Max Brook’s World War Z, and Colson Whitehead’s Zone One took serious literary stabs at the realm of the living dead.