Government

6.14.17: Civics 101 & Threshold

Jun 14, 2017
Kabsik Park via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/dhTjZ

On today's show:

6.13.17: Civics 101 & Threshold

Jun 13, 2017
U.S. Geological Survey via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/kj623W

On today's show:

6.12.17: Civics 101 & The Threshold Podcast

Jun 12, 2017
NPS / Jacob W. Frank | Public Domain / https://flic.kr/p/ThR1AE

On today's show:

  • Civics 101 - Declaring War
  • "'Please Call Stella': Capturing English, from Afrikaans to Zulu." Producer Rebecca Sheir taks a look -- and listen -- inside the world's largest online database of English accents. Listen again at prx.org.
  • All this week we're playing episodes from the first season of the podcast Threshold. Today we talk to the host of the podcast, Amy Martin and share Episode 1. Listen to this Episode 1 here. To learn more, see photos, and listen to bonus interviews, head to thresholdpodcast.org.

davidd via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/73o3Lh

On today's show: 

Malcolm Logan via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/aXceDr

On today's show:

Blueboxes via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/SspmV6

On today's show:

4.18.17: Vetoes & Kinan Azmeh

Apr 18, 2017
Tim Evanson via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/cVHCid

On today's show:

  • Civics 101: Veto
  • "Crazy Bet" from producer Nate DiMeo and The Memory Palace. Listen again at PRX.org. 
  • Clarinetist and composer Kinan Azmeh was born in Damascus, but now lives in New York, where he wakes up to bad news each day. He’s going to be performing with the Kinan Azmeh CityBand at Phillips Academy Exeter tonight at 7:00pm and at the West Claremont Center for Music and the Arts tomorrow, April 19th at 6:30pm to celebrate the band's 10th season together. This is our previous conversation with Kinan and composer Kareem Roustom, recorded in 2013.
  • "The Gift of Music" from Masumi Hayashi-Smith and the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. Listen again at PRX.org. 

Urban Strategies via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/gaw1RS

On today's show:

https://giphy.com/gifs/wvpublic-O2iMIrNhYCs9O/

On today's show:

Andy Field via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/c7VEL

On today's show:

James Yu via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/rZ3TL

On today's show:

3.13.17: Civics 101 & The Stranger in the Woods

Mar 13, 2017
Bureau of Land Management Oregon and Washington via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/itv23E

On today's show:

James Cridland via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/Wd54U

On today's show:

Episode 2: White House Press Corps

Jan 26, 2017
Logan Shannon / New Hampshire Public Radio

What's it really like for a journalist stationed at the White House? We go inside the press briefing room with NPR's Senior White House Correspondent, Scott Horsley.

aveira via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/6Myi84

In the first 100 days of his presidency, FDR passed a staggering seventy six pieces of legislation. Barack Obama, passed just 11. On today’s show we’ll look into partisan politics and the changing presidential mandate, and why the first 100 days is a metric worth looking at.

And, while most ski mountains in New England are facing the effects of a warming climate, another problem is slowly developing: aging chairlifts.

Plus we’ll check in with chamber pop band San Fermin before they play House of Blues in Boston this Saturday.

Episode 1: Chief of Staff

Jan 20, 2017
Logan Shannon

We're all familiar with the title, but what does a White House Chief of Staff actually do? What does the daily routine entail? And how much power does the position hold?  Our inaugural episode covers the basics of the President's gatekeeper.

onepinkhippo via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8oatHS

In Australia, there is a small marsupial called the antechinus. It looks a lot like an ordinary mouse, but has an extraordinary life-cycle. Today, we discover a host of incredible organisms that illustrate the absurdity and elegance of evolution.

Plus, a regulatory conundrum over catfish. At a moment when the political divide is as wide as it's ever been, some republicans and democrats are actually coming together - over a bottom-feeder.

PROJes Via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/5vQAxc

When you’re on vacation or in an unfamiliar part of town looking for something to eat, you might look up restaurant reviews on Yelp to help narrow your choices. But now, prisoners across the country are also gravitating toward the platform and describing their experiences in jail. Review platforms like Yelp have become an unexpected online space for people to make the prison system more transparent while simultaneously fulfilling a personal and therapeutic void.

hillary h via flickr Creative Commons

USA Today recently published the U.S. Senate handbook, a 380 page document of rules intended to keep Senate offices running smoothly. On today’s show, from carpet color to telephone hold music, we reveal the handbook’s most confounding regulations.

Plus, ‘tis the season of ghosts, witches, and vampires. We’ll explore how cultures around the world interpret the supernatural.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

3.19.14: Big Data, ICANN & Body Farm

Mar 19, 2014
via amazon.com

Today on Word of Mouth, we're unpacking big data. Should we fear or embrace it? Then we get a lesson on ICANN - what it is and how the decision made by the Obama administration not to renew its contract to oversee see it actually affects the way the internet functions. Finally, bodies! How do you study the effects of certain conditions on human remains? With a body farm, of course.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

In 2004, the Center for Women in Government released a report about women in top appointed positions in all 50 state governments. NH ranked last in percentage of such appointments. After a back and forth with Gov. Craig Benson’s office, NHPR's Raquel Maria Dillon reports, an updated survey then placed NH seventh. 

NH Furloughed Workers Urged To File For Benefits

Oct 4, 2013
bytemarks / Flickr Creative Commons

 

The New Hampshire Employment Security agency says employees who have been furloughed or temporarily laid off during the federal government shutdown may file for unemployment benefits and should open their claim this week.

Employment Security Commissioner George Copadis said people should apply as soon as possible. He said if individuals waits to file, they won't be able to request or receive benefits for previous weeks.

Federal employees must apply for benefits in the state in which they work.

About 120 New Hampshire National Guard members are back at work after being furloughed as part of a federal government shutdown.

The military technicians received exemptions and were allowed to go back to work Thursday. About 100 of them work at the Pease Air National Guard Base; the rest are Army guardsmen.

About 330 other National Guard members remain on furlough.

There are about 2,800 troops in total.

jacqueline.poggi / Flickr Creative Commons

With a partial Government closing now in effect – some services will continue, such as the military and the mail. But others won’t- from National forests and Parks to federally-backed loans.   We’ll look at the politics and the economics of this, and gauge reaction in the granite state.

GUESTS:

iStockPhoto

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: What is the gist of President Obama’s new plan to tackle global warming and how does the green community feel about what the White House is proposing?  -- Bill Kemp, Seattle WA

girlsofatomiccity.com

The story of the development and deployment of the atomic bomb is generally told as a narrative driven by powerful men like Oppenheimer, Truman, and Stimson, operating at the highest levels of government. What few people know is how many women played a crucial role – albeit unknowingly – in one of the most significant turning points in history. Denise Kiernan interviewed several women who worked in Oak Ridge, Tennessee – a secret, government-built town created as part of the Manhattan Project. Their stories, combined with detailed reporting, come together in her new book called The Girls of Atomic City.

Code for America

The non-profit Code for America brings together coders, artists, and designers to create easy to use applications that address the specific needs of local communities.  Mick Thompson, engineer in residence and 2012 fellow at Code for America joined us to talk about how code and collaboration leads to better lives for citizens.

stoven2 via Flickr Creative Commons

The last few weeks of 2012 were dominated by media coverage of the fiscal cliff crisis. News outlets covered everything from the projected impact of the cliff to shouting matches between legislators. Lost in the mix throughout the crisis were important, but less sensational news stories. Joshua Keating is an associate editor at Foreign Policy and he joins us to talk about some of these backseat news items.

I am I.A.M. via Flicker Creative Commons

Canada, as the old Robin Williams joke goes…"is like a really huge loft apartment above a really great party.” Americans tend to think of Canada as a punch line…or the mystical country where healthcare is free and Justin Bieber came from.

Civics for Citizenship

Aug 29, 2012
adam (THEO) via Flickr Creative Commons

One goal of our schools is to prepare young people to become informed and engaged citizens. Yet there is growing concern that students are not being prepared to participate in democracy, to learn from the historical actions of American government, or – critically - to understand the U.S. Constitution. We’ll take a look at efforts to address this here in New Hampshire.

Guests:

Pages